Time To Cast Yer #Vote Me #Hearties! Let’s Pick A Name Fer This Here #PirateShip!

We’re ready to vote for author P.S. Bartlett’s Pirate Ship. Please help with your vote. I’m sure it’s fun. She listed all these great names!

Author P.S. Bartlett

“Here, every man is equal.” ~Billy Bones

Billy Bones

Leaving the poll up a few more days! You can vote more than once so please do. 

If you know anything about pirates, one of the most important matters aboard a ship is that all crew members get a vote on everything relating to ship business. I’d like to apply the same principles here for the naming of my newest pirate ship. She’s captained by a fearless and ruthless pirate, who goes by the name of Black Eye Woodley, in my forthcoming novel, Jaded Tides. However, this fine upstanding gentleman and his equally as ruthless cast of colorful characters aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. They’ll definitely be sailing straight through into my next installment in the Razor’s Adventure Series, so keep a weathered eye on the horizon mates!

I’ve chosen my favorite suggestions from all of the posts here on my blog, as…

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Hello from the Writer’s Room, are you still there?

Laurie Smith, a friend of mine who is not only an extraordinary author (Writer of the “Death Series”, Mountain of Death, Valley of Death, River of Death) – but he as well is an amazing photographer and shares his pictures on his blog. This is another series of pictures I admire. Have a peek.

5 Reasons Internal Dialogue is Essential in Fiction (And How to Use It in Your Story)

Marcy Kennedy talks on Kristen Lamb’s blog about internal dialogue and how to use it in books. What an amazing blog post – definitely worth reading!

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Today, I have a special treat for you guys. Author, speaker, editor and long-time W.A.N.A. International Instructor Marcy Kennedy is here to talk about internal dialogue—when to use it, why we use it and how not to get all cray-cray with it.

Trust us. As editors, Marcy and I see it all. Often newer writers swing to one extreme or another. Either they stay SO much in a character’s head that we (the reader) are trapped in The Land of Nothing Happening or we’re never given any insight into the character’s inner thought life, leaving said character as interesting as a rice cake.

Like all things in fiction, balance is key. Marcy is here to work her magic and teach y’all how to use internal dialogue for max effect.

Take it away, Marcy!

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Understanding why something is important to our writing lays the foundation for bettering our writing because it…

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Help Me Name A #PirateShip! 

Feel like naming a pirate ship and supporting the author? Read on. It’s amazing!

Author P.S. Bartlett


Help! Well okay, this isn’t exactly a life threatening help but this is a literary FUN cry for help.How would you like to help me name the next pirate ship in Jaded Tides, today?

This ship and crew of pirates are definitely baddies. These guys are rough, gruff and do not play around. Unfortunately, this bad ass treasure hunting bucket of rum and guns is a brig. She sits about 130 feet long and has 18 gun ports.

By the way if I choose your suggestion, I’ll give you credit in my acknowledgements as well as a signed paperback for USA readers! ☺️☺️☺️☺️☺️ Ready, set…Name her!!!

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How to Create Dimensional Characters—Beyond the Wound & Into the Blind Spot

Kristen Lamb, excellent writer and teacher has created a blog post which is not only entertaining, but teaching a very interesting and important lesson about the creation of characters.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Today, we’re going to explore an extension of the WOUND. The BLIND SPOT. There are no perfect personalities. All great character traits possess a blind spot. The loyal person is a wonderful friend, but can be naive and taken advantage of.

The take-charge Alpha leader can make a team successful, but also inadvertently tromp over feelings or even fail to realize that others have great ideas, too. Maybe even BETTER ideas.

A super caring, nurturing personality can be an enabler or maybe even ignore close relationships to take care of strangers. Someone who is great with money can end up a miser. A person with a fantastic work ethic can become a workaholic.

Y’all get the gist.

Often the antagonist (Big Boss Troublemaker) is a mirror of the protagonist, especially in the beginning of the story.

To use an example from a movie we have likely all seen. In Top…

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How to Use Pinterest to Get Massive Amounts of New Readers (Guest Post)…

Janice Wald has written a guest post on The Story Reading Ape’s blog about how to use Pinterest as a Marketing tool and attract more readers.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

A reader was confused.

After reading a persuasive blog post about the value of Pinterest, he inquired of the writer, “Is it possible for authors to use Pinterest to get attention to their writing.

I only have one word for this reader and anyone else wondering.

Absolutely!

Pinterest has great value for writers and anyone looking to grow their readership due to the vast amount of people using Pinterest.

More than 60% of all consumers get information visually, by looking at pictures. Pinterest is comprised of these graphics, or pins, displayed on virtual bulletin boards.

The answer for writers looking to use Pinterest to grow their audiences is simple—use Pinterest bulletin boards to get interest in snippets of your writing.

How to Use Pinterest Boards to Create Interest in Your Writing

The diagram below shows a basic plot structure. If you make a Pinterest board for each element of your…

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20 Writing Prompts – August 2015

Are you suffering from writer’s block? Are you stuck with your writing? Should you be creative in some way and your brain is just “blank”? Kimberely Crawford offers 20 amazing writing prompts in case you need them.

Kimberley Crawford

It’s that time again. Time for another list of writing prompts for your writing pleasure. Use them to help with writer’s block or to get the juices flowing, or don’t use them at all. That’s your choice. I’m just putting them here so you can maybe find some inspiration from them. Anyway, here they are!

  1. Write a myth to explain why the sun sets.
  2. You travel back in time to 1900 BC. Explain how it happened and what you experience.
  3. You were aboard the ship that Christopher Columbus sailed to the Americas. Write about what you experienced.
  4. Rewrite your favourite fairy tale.
  5. You are learning how to fly your first spaceship.
  6. Describe Hell.
  7. Describe happiness as a person.
  8. You invent a serum to help rich people live forever, but they must start their new life at the bottom and start from scratch to gain back their fortune.
  9. Write a potion…

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Unusual Jobs Of Famous Writers Infographic…

I’m sure this is something that will surprise you as much as it caught me. I found it on “The Story Reading Ape’s” blog. Have fun finding out what famous writers did for living before they were famous for their books.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Hi Chris,

My name is Alisa and I’m a part of the Unplag team.

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I want to inform you that we have created a great infographic ‘Unusual Jobs Of Famous Writers’by Daria Bilokon.

Daria Bilokon Daria Bilokon

The main idea – many of big-name authors had unbelievably weird jobs not related to their writing careers at all.

Please, consider sharing it among your readers.

It would be an honour to be a part of your blog.

Alisa Korzh Alisa Korzh

Alisa

writers-weird-jobs1 By kind permission of UNPLAG

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