You Asked: What the Heck is a Beta Reader? Do I Need One?

Sheila M. Good published a great post about Beta Readers. Thank you very much for reminding me! That’s another task ahead of me!

COW PASTURE CHRONICLES

Beta ReaderWelcome to another,  You Asked, the Experts Answer, segment.  This week’s question is: What are Beta Readers and do I need one?

A Beta Reader is someone who reads your manuscript before you release it and provides feedback.

Similar to technology companies who release software updates to Beta Testers for the purpose of identifying any bugs before releasing the software to everyone.

A Beta Reader does the same sort of thing for you. It’s a test run of your manuscript.

Is it the Same as a Critique?

No. Critiques, are more in-depth and focused on grammar, plot holes, and the mechanics of writing.

A Beta Reader focuses on reading your manuscript. Feedback received includes their overall impression and any glaring mistakes. They will also provide a review after the release of your book.

Do I Need One?

Based on what publishers and other experts say, yes. For those who choose…

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What do you like about Mysteries? – Reader Survey!

Ronovan Hester has published a new review. Please take a moment to share your opinion and make the review a success! Thank you!

 

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Lit World Interviews

Here we are on LitWorldInterviews with our first of many Genre oriented surveys. The success of our previous survey “Why do people stop reading a book?” and the response in the comments prompted a more detailed evaluation of the topic.

Please reblog and sharethis with as many people as you can so we have a lot of responses to make the data we share as accurate as can be expected. We need plenty of responses or there’s no reason to do the results.

This month’s survey is the genre of Mystery.

Thank you to the following 19 bloggers for making our previous survey such a success by reblogging the survey:

James Glenora

Aurora Jean Alexander

Juliette King

Stevie Turner

Linda G. Hill

Vanderso

Wendy Anne Darling

Adele Marie Park

Woebegone but Hopeful

Lori Carlson

Colleen Chesebro

E.S. Tyree

Ravenhawks’ Magazine

Sally G. Cronin

Gipsika

Tricia Drammeh

Susan Gutterman

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Free online course from the grandmother of all creative writing courses – the University of Iowa

Thank you so much, Bridget Whelan, for this information!

This course is all FREE TO EVERYONE in the world who have access to a computer or mobile device with a stable internet connection…

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

The very first creative writing workshops were pioneered at the University of Iowa in the 1930s and they still have a mighty reputation today.

They are now offering a free open online course to explore Walt Whitman’s writings on the American Civil War,  looking at how writing and image can be used to examine war, conflict, trauma, and reconciliation – in Whitman’s time and today.

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Whitman’s Civil War: Writing and Imaging Loss, Death, and Disaster is open to everyone and they mean everyone. Erxperienced writers and absolute beginners can apply, people who are already experts in Walt Whitman and those who have never heard of the 19th century American poet are welcome.

That’s not all, the International Department at Iowa promise:

Participants who are nonnative speakers of English, new to online learning, and/or new to writing are encouraged to join this new international community. Our community moderators will actively support…

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14 Different Writer Reactions to Their Characters First Kiss #writers #romance #kiss

BlondeWriteMore has posted an absolutely intriguing list of different writer reactions to their characters first kiss… I love it!!

BlondeWriteMore

The writer has been cleverly building the romantic tension between their main characters. Both characters have been playing what I like to call ‘flirty games’ for a chapter or so (lots of giggling, eye contact, lip biting and playing with hair) and now it is time for them to kiss. The writer takes a deep breath and dives straight into writing the first kiss.

Once finished the writer sits back and casts their eye over what they have written. Below is a list of different writer reactions to the kissing scene:

  1. *Dreamy facial expression followed by a gaze out of the window*
  2. Sigh!
  3. “Yukthat sounds gross!” – the writer looks away in disgust.
  4. “Calm down – it’s not like he’s the last man on Earth!” *rolls eyes at female character*
  5. “Would it be that intense and passionate on a first kiss?” *chews end of pencil and deliberates*
  6. *Mischievous wink at…

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Are You Botching Your Dialogue?

For those who need tips and tricks, support and help with their dialogue. Kristen Lamb published a very helpful post about this subject.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Today we are going to talk about dialogue. Everyone thinks they are great at it, and many would be wrong. Dialogue really is a lot tricker than it might seem.

Great dialogue is one of the most vital components of fiction. Dialogue is responsible for not only conveying the plot, but it also helps us understand the characters and get to know them, love them, hate them, whatever.

Dialogue is powerful for revealing character. This is as true in life as it is on the page. If people didn’t judge us based on how we speak, then business professionals wouldn’t bother with Toastmasters, speaking coaches or vocabulary builders.

I’d imagine few people who’d hire a brain surgeon who spoke like a rap musician and conversely, it would be tough to enjoy rap music made by an artist who spoke like the curator of an art museum.

Our word choices are…

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Setting—Why a Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Kristen Lamb talks about ‘setting’ and does it in such a unique and educational way. I love to read her blog posts that are a real support for me and I hope for other new authors as well.

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Kristen Lamb's Blog

Today we are going to talk about setting and ways to use it to strengthen your writing and maybe even add in some dimension. Setting is more than a weather report. It can be a magnificent tool to deepen characters.

Setting Can Help Your Characterization

Setting can actually serve a dual role in that it can be not only the backdrop for your story, but it can also serve characterization through symbol.

We editors love to say, “Show. Don’t tell.” Okey dokey, here’s where setting can help you do just that.

Say you have a character, Buffy, who is depressed. You could go on and on telling us she is blue and how she cannot believe her husband left her for the Scentsy lady, OR you can show us through setting.

Buffy’s once beautiful garden is overgrown with weeds and piles of unopened mail are tossed carelessly on the floor. Her…

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Ronovan’s Debut Novel is FREE beginning TODAY!

Amber Wake is for free for another two days! Go and get it – I did too and I can’t wait to read it!!

Lit World Interviews

It’s MY Birthday and YOU get the GIFT!

Get my debut Historical Fiction, Action-Adventure

Amber Wake: Gabriel Falling

for

FREE

on

Amazon Kindle!

No sign ups for newsletters or anything. Just go and get it!

Reblog and Share this post anyway you can to help!

Check your Amazon. Below is the American Amazon link.

https://www.amazon.com/AMBER-WAKE-Gabriel-Falling-Adventures-ebook/dp/B01BI6BI82?ie=UTF8&ref_=asap_bc

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