Can A Writer Have Too Many Ideas?

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Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com

 


 

I’m in fact a little curious how other writers are doing this…

Do you ever feel like your head is bursting with all the ideas you got? How do you sort them out? How do you arrange them?

 

Let’s say: you get an idea:

·    where do you go with it?

·    how do you know what to do with it?

·    where do you start with it?

·    do you file it? And if yes, where?

·    do you park it until you need it or are ready to write the story?

 

At times I feel like my head is exploding, having so many ideas while at other days my brain just goes blank. But once I get these ideas, what am I doing with them? I do have a file on my computer, named “ideas.” Occasionally I go back to find out if they’re useful at that moment. And so many times I realized, that I’ve got no clue what I wanted with that idea or where to go from there. It can be annoying.

Right now I’m working on a series of novellas and novels… the first book of the series is completed and with the editor now. So is the third one.

I’m still writing the second one… but since the first and second’s character’s are “overlapping” I need to work very carefully on that second book to not make plot mistakes I don’t want to expect my future readers to put up with.

I admit, my thoughts, my idea developing and my research circle mainly around this particular series.

When I lately needed a break from working on my second book, I found myself having a brainwave. And instead of “parking” the idea in my particular file, I decided instead to start on the fourth book of the series. I have huge plans for that book, considering I briefly introduced a few of this particular’s story’s characters to my readers of this blog.

To my great astonishment, I found myself writing like crazy on that fourth book. I’m enthusiastic since it seems I only have to put pen to paper and it writes nearly by itself.

Until a few weeks ago when I discovered a new major character of the series I repeated what I did before and quickly decided not to “park” the idea until I get there, but just start the fifth book of the series.

Here I am now, at the same time working on the second, the fourth and the fifth book of the series.

I was asking myself: am I getting into conflicts? What will happen if I can’t ‘switch’ quickly enough and start making mistakes? But so far I’m good, I know exactly which character belongs where and what my plans with them are.

And still: There is this one question: Did I have too many ideas at the same time? Can I continue like this? How are other writers handling this kind of “idea attack”?

Do you ever feel like having “too many ideas”? Are you writing on one and one book or story? Am I doing something wrong?  Please, help me out, I’d be grateful for your opinion.


Picture courtesy of www.pinterest.com
Picture courtesy of http://www.pinterest.com

The Ultimate Character Questionnaire (156 questions)…

Chris, The Story Reading Ape has provided us with part of a blog post and a link to the “Novel Factory”, where this particular post was published. The post provides us with the ultimate character questionnaire, asking 156 questions which help us to develop our characters.
(I thought the list was fascinating, even more since I don’t know myself as well as my characters after developing them with the help of this list.) But please, check it out. it is helpful.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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This character questionnaire has been collated from a variety of sources. It has been split into categories to try to make it more manageable, but this categorisation is far from perfect and lots of the questions could probably be in more than one category.

If you can think of a question that isn’t here and think it should be added – let us know!

Basic

First name:
Surname:
Middle name:
Nicknames:
Date of birth:
Age:

Physical Appearance

Height:
Weight:
Hair:
Eyes:
Distinguishing facial features?
Which facial feature is most prominent?
Which bodily feature is most prominent?
Skin:
Hands:
Scars:
Birthmarks?
Physical handicaps?
Type of clothes?
How do they wear their clothes?
What are their feet like? (type of shoes, state of shoes, socks, feet, pristine, dirty, worn, etc)
Race / Ethnicity?

Personality

What words or phrases do they overuse?
Are they more optimistic or pessimistic?
Do they ever put on…

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Do I Need to Copyright My Book?

Jason Matthews has published an article about Copyright, which I consider very helpful. Thank you, Jason.

How to Make, Market and Sell Ebooks

copyright all rights reservedLike ISBN, copyright questions are common and the legalities of it can be complex. In most cases, copyright is something an author won’t need to spend much time worrying about. The tasks to copyright a book are straightforward, starting with simply writing a book. If you have any concerns, this fact alone should give some relief;

By writing your book, you own the copyright.

In 1886 The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works was signed as an international agreement on copyright. Your creation is your intellectual property. Think of it like this: only you have the “right” to “copy” your work and sell it; nobody else has the right to copy your work and sell it.

Your book is automatically under copyright, extending from the time you write it. However, there is a stipulation of proof. You need to commit the work to a readable form perceptible either…

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» 62 Poetry Manuscript Publishers Who Do Not Charge Reading Fees

Thank you, Colleen Chesebro for providing us with a link to this list. It might be useful for some of us.

Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry

Author’s Publish shares a listing of Poetry Manuscript Publishers you might want to check out… ❤

Most poetry manuscript publishers charge their readers a fee to submit. You can read about why that is the case here. This article focuses on a number of poetry manuscript publishers who do not charge submission fees to writers, which is good news for poets.This is the most complete list of poetry manuscript publishers who do not charge fees, on the internet, or off for that matter.

Source: » 62 Poetry Manuscript Publishers Who Do Not Charge Reading Fees

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How To Write Characters from the Opposite Gender

I find it very interesting what Rachel Poli has to say about how to write characters from the opposite gender. Have a peek. I’m sure you agree. Thank you Rachel.

Rachel Poli

I’m sure I don’t need to tell you that boys and girls are different. We’re different physically, mentally, and emotionally.

I’m a girl and have no idea what goes through the mind of a boy. Boys have no idea what girls go through. We pretend we understand the opposite gender, but we really have no clue.

With that being said, it’s much easier to write in the female point of view if you’re a female yourself.

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When I first started writing my mystery series,George Florence, the main protagonist was George himself. It was all in first-person, but some things just weren’t clicking with the rest of the story.

I eventually changed the point of view to third-person with George still in charge, but even that didn’t work out. With the help of my writer’s group, I came to the conclusion that even though George calls the shots for…

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