A Research On The Most Exquisite Jewelry on Earth

Being bored lately and reading a good book I once more stumbled across the famous “Faberge Eggs” and finally decided to do some real research on them. Of course, I had heard of them earlier, saw the one or other picture, but I never tried to find out where exactly they came from, how many existed and still exist and how exactly they look like.

I thought, I never know when it mind come in handy knowing more about all this and went to work. Maybe either one of you writers can use this information for one of your books, so, if you can – help yourself!

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Picture courtesy of wikipedia

Peter Carl Fabergé

Peter Carl Fabergé, also known as Karl Gustavovich Faberge (Karl Gustavovich Faberzhe; 30 May 1846 – 24 September 1920), was a Russian jeweller best known for the famous Fabergé eggs made in the style of genuine Easter eggs, but using precious metals and gemstones rather than more mundane materials.

He was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia, to the Baltic German jeweller Gustav Fabergé and his Danish wife Charlotte Jungstedt.
In 1864, Peter Carl embarked upon a Grand Tour of Europe. He received tuition from respected goldsmiths in Germany, France and England, attended a course at Schloss’s Commercial College in Paris, and viewed the objects in the galleries of Europe’s leading museums.
His travel and study continued until 1872, when at the age of 26 he returned to St. Petersburg and married Augusta Julia Jacobs. For the following 10 years, his father’s trusted workmaster Hiskias Pendin acted as his mentor and tutor.

When Peter Carl took over the House, there was a move from producing jewelry in the then-fashionable French 18th century style to becoming artist-jewellers. Fabergé’s production of the very first so-called Fabergé egg, the Hen Egg, given as a gift from the Tsar to his wife Maria Fyodorovna on Orthodox Easter (24 March) of 1885 so delighted her that on 1 May the Emperor assigned Fabergé the title Goldsmith by special appointment to the Imperial Crown of that year.

In light of the Empress’ response to receiving one of Fabergé’s eggs on Easter, the Tsar soon commissioned the company to make an Easter egg as a gift for her every year thereafter. The Tsar placed an order for another egg the following year. Beginning in 1887, the Tsar apparently gave Carl Fabergé complete freedom with regard to egg designs, which then became more and more elaborate. According to Fabergé Family tradition, not even the Tsar knew what form they would take— the only stipulation was that each one should be unique and each should contain a surprise. Upon the death of Alexander III, his son, the next Tsar, Nicholas II, followed this tradition and expanded it by requesting that there be two eggs each year, one for his mother (who was eventually given a total of 30 such eggs) and one for his wife, Alexandra (who received another 20). These Easter gift eggs are today distinguished from the other jeweled eggs Fabergé ended up producing by their designation as “Imperial Easter eggs” or “Tsar Imperial Easter eggs”. The tradition continued until the October Revolution when the entire Romanov dynasty was executed and the eggs and many other treasures were confiscated by the interim government. The two final eggs were never delivered nor paid for.

In 1916, the House of Fabergé became a joint-stock company with a capital of 3-million rubles.
The following year upon the outbreak of the October Revolution, the business was taken over by a ‘Committee of the Employees of the Company K Fabergé. In 1918 The House of Fabergé was nationalised by the Bolsheviks. In early October the stock was confiscated. The House of Fabergé was no more.

After the nationalisation of the business, Carl Fabergé left St. Petersburg on the last diplomatic train for Riga. In mid-November, the Revolution having reached Latvia, he fled to Germany and first settled in Bad Homburg and then in Wiesbaden. Eugène, the Fabergés’ eldest, travelled with his mother in darkness by sleigh and on foot through snow-covered woods and reached Finland in December 1918. During June 1920, Eugène reached Wiesbaden and accompanied his father to Switzerland where other members of the family had taken refuge at the Bellevue Hotel in Pully, near Lausanne.
Peter Carl Fabergé never recovered from the shock of the Russian Revolution He died in Switzerland on September 24, 1920. His family believed he died of a broken heart.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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The Fabergé Eggs

It seems there was a total of 65 Faberge Eggs made, 50 of them were the so called “Imperial Eggs,” gifts from the Tsar of Russia to either wife or wife and mother.

I could, of course, go and name each one of them, copy and insert all necessary information. This would guarantee you’re bored to death and that this blog post would reach from here to Outer Mongolia, but I found, in fact, a page, who provides us with all necessary and interesting information about the eggs. The year they were made, who they were made for, the owners, pictures and more.
Thank you very much, Mieks, of ‘Wintraeken‘, Netherlands, who has created the most informative and colorful pages about the Faberge Eggs.

Clicking HERE takes you directly to Miek’s list of eggs. Each egg-name turns into a pop-up which gives you a picture of the respective egg with all interesting information.

 

 

Picture courtesy of: http://www.wintraecken.nl/mieks/faberge/eggs/eggs.htm

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The House of Fabergé

 

After the brand name “House of Fabergé” has been sold – and sold again, serving as a name for cosmetics, alcohol as well as fashion, it finally ended up back in the hands of a family member, Tatjana Faberge who reunited the Family name with the Family in 2007.
The entire history of what happened after the House of Fabergé was nationalized in 1918 can be read on the Fabergé Website. (Click the logo)

Picture courtesy of: Faberge.com

 

And, in case you’re interested, what Fabergé does nowadays, I strongly recommend to check out their website. I believe that they still created some of the most impressive, unique and wonderful jewelry existing. A kaleidoscope of gems, forms, and metal that make the most beautiful woman’s heart beat faster.

 

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All there’s left to do for me is, showing you my favorite Fabergé-Egg. It is the 1898 ‘Lillies of the Valley’ Egg, a gift from Tsar Nicholas to Alexandra.  Which one is yours?

Picture courtesy of: http://www.wintraecken.nl/

 

 

 

 

Back to School – New W.A.N.A. Classes for September! – written by Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb has posted the new upcoming W.A.N.A. classes for September 2017! Thank you Kristen!

 

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It’s back to school for everyone – not just kids. Vacation’s over. Fun’s over…or maybe the fun is just beginning.

This fall, W.A.N.A. is back with new classes, new instructors, and lots of exciting announcements coming up. Bookmark W.A.N.A. and make sure to subscribe to my blog to stay up-to-date with all the news!

Don’t forget to hop on over to the W.A.N.A. Tribe to join in our daily writing sprints in the chat room! The Tribe is a thriving community, and we are planning on some awesome upgrades to the entire Tribe experience this fall.

NEW CLASSES FOR SEPTEMBER 2017(click the link for the classes)

 

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/08/new-september-classes/

71 Ways To Slowly Kill Your Blog

Hugh from ‘Hugh’s Views And News” provides us with a list of 71 ways to slowly kill your blog. Thanks for useful advice, Hugh! This is great for all bloggers.

Hugh's Views & News  

I’ve got murder on my mind. Are you responsible for any of these?

  1. Do not have an ‘about me’ page on your blog
  2. Your ‘about me’ page takes more than a few seconds to find
  3. Your ‘about me’ page starts with these words – ‘this is an example of an about me page…’
  4. The number of followers you have is more important to you than what you write
  5. Poor quality posts
  6. Have broken links on your blog which you have no idea are broken or can not be bothered to fix
  7. Do not respond to comments
  8. Do not respond to questions
  9. Ignore your readers
  10. Do not treat visitors to your blog as guests
  11. Have no name to be called by
  12. Do not read other blogs
  13. Do not comment on other blogs
  14. Believe that blogging is going to make you rich
  15. Leave links with no relevance (usually to your own posts)…

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Anatomy of a Bad Review

Author Don Massenzio provides us with the analysis of a bad review written for one of his books. In my opinion he gives us a great example on how to handle bad reviews in general. But I figure I will find out for sure once one of my own books is published. Thanks for this post, Don!

Author Don Massenzio

online-reviewers Thumb up and down buttons

I’ve been blessed. I’ve written a number of books. I’ve been very fortunate. Readers that I don’t know have given my work reviews that have, in the vast majority, earned four or five stars.

That’s why, when I receive a bad review, I like to study it and figure out if there is something I can learn to improve my work.

Let Me Be Frank - CoverWhen I signed onto the Amazon author’s site, I saw this review for my second book, Let Me Be Frank:

bad review

I’ve redacted the name in this review. I didn’t want to make this post about the person who submitted the review, I wanted to make it a teaching moment.

First, I looked at the review. It’s titled ‘Boring’ and starts out with the words ‘too slow’. This is valid criticism for a book and sometimes, in a detective novel, the pacing can be…

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7 Signs of an Awesome Submission

Steven Capps provides us with a great post about 7 signs of an awesome submission. I really like the 7 points he describes here. Thank you, Steven!

Bard & Books

Welcome, friends! I’m currently busy time traveling so you should be reading this in the future while I am busy in the backwoods of South Carolina for some military training. I’m sure currently having a grand time dealing with summer in the south and proabably not having a shower. (Actually this is a lie because I forgot to schedule ti and now that I’m back it kind of destroys the joke.) Anyways, back to this weeks post.

I’m still need to do the drawing for the Writers Toolkit so I imagine that will happen tonight. If you haven’t followed the blog or signed up for the newsletter this is your last chance to be entered in this drawing. I’m definitely going to do another giveaway, though  I am thinking of giving away a signed Patrick Rothfuss or Brandon Sanderson book for the next one. I’ll have more details later.

First…

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A tribute to ALL Women…

Thank you very much Story Reading Ape, for mentioning my name when publishing this amazing tribute to women. It’s unique and it touches my heart and I’m sure the hearts of many others too. You’re a gem!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

My thanks toAurora Jean Alexander  for sending me this

it’s one of the best tributes to women I’ve read

When God created woman he was working late on the 6th day…….

An angel came by and asked.” Why spend so much time on her?”

The lord answered. “Have you seen all the specifications I have to meet to shape her?”

●She must function on all kinds of situations.
●She must be able to embrace several kids at the same time.
●Have a hug that can heal anything from a bruised knee to a broken heart.
●She must do all this with only two hands.
●She cures herself when sick and can work 18 hours a day.

The Angel was impressed” Just two hands…..impossible!

And this is the standard model?”

The Angel came closer and touched the woman.

“But you have made her so soft, Lord”.

“She is soft”…

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A Sick Writer

By now I guess, it’s known that I have been sick for a few weeks, being ‘blessed’ with shingles and pneumonia to the same time. I could have done the one without both, but after all, I’m afraid, I had to take it the way it got me.

Now, being in pain and feeling sick, having a fever and not finding any comfortable position, I wasn’t able to do much more than drinking, resting, sleeping, watching TV and trying to keep my cats away from climbing on me.

And here exactly is the point I start complaining…

I’m a writer. A sick writer. And I would have loved to ‘use’ the time getting some work done. Typing, blogging, scribbling, planning new stories, reading and whatever else belongs to a writer’s life, but I had no chance.

Shingles caused me that much pain that all I could do was trying to find a way to spend the days on the couch with plenty of pain killers inside of me that nearly knocked me out. There was no way I would have been able to sit behind the computer and type much.

I was unable to turn onto my stomach to write by hand on paper. And when I tried to read I started feeling dizzy enough, I was ready to vomit.

I wanted to work, develop ideas, find new characters, plots, storylines, whatever came into my mind, and nothing was possible.

But of course I’m smart, right? I got my phone next to me. And whenever I had an idea, I recorded it. What a wonderful girl I am! The idea would have been amazing, if…

… yes, there’s an ‘if’…

… if, I hadn’t been too sick to make sense.

Yes, you can laugh. I did too once I listened to my ‘notes’. I was sick enough that I couldn’t hear much more than some mumbling. And if there was a clear word or two, it didn’t make sense.

My fever was high enough to cook my brain, which means, the ideas I got are entirely useless. This is annoying and nearly make me consider getting either a secretary, a nurse – or both.

I’m almost sure I’m not the only writer ever being sick. How are you doing this? Are you able to use your time fruitfully during this forced break? If yes, how are you doing it? Thank you for your advice!

Picture courtesy of wikimedia

A Health Break

As some of you might know, a few weeks back being in severe pain I had to go to the ER. After the weekend passed we had found out I had shingles. Trying to arrange my life with shingles wouldn’t be easy, I knew that. It would take a few weeks, but it can be done.

While working on that I developed a high fever. As usually, the flu comes up when you need it least, right? Or so I thought…

With all the medication I had to take for the shingles I did not want to uncontrolled take even more meds and end up unconscious in a corner one day with a cocktail of chemistry in my veins. I had survived the flu before and would survive again. Wonderful me.

Until I started coughing…

It was time to go back to the doctor. Diagnosis was quick: a massive infection… My ‘flu’ turned out to be a bad infection of the upper and lower respiratory system.

This means, sleeping, taking antibiotics, sleeping again… and trying to recover.

It will need a while. And during this recovery process I’m afraid I won’t be found behind the computer too often. I will be back as soon as I can. I miss writing and blogging.

But my health commands a break right now.

See you soon! Take care.

Picture courtesy of: http://behappy.me/im-sick-of-being-sick–102615

How To Organize A Blog Tour – Research by A. J. Alexander

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During the past years of activity on ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest,’ and the inquiries to publish posts and interviews for different Blog Tours I promised myself once I find the time I would do research on ‘Blog Tours.’ What is this? And why is it so important to writers? Who does organize them and if I have to do that myself, how to do it best?

What is a Blog Tour?

Alessandra Wike writes on “PR by the book”:
The age of the internet gives authors the opportunity to connect with thousands of people. Taking advantage of these seemingly endless possibilities, blog tours provide great publicity for a new book without the hassle (or expense!) of travel. Instead of an author traveling from bookstore to bookstore and city to city, an author’s book can travel virtually from blog to blog and garner hundreds, if not thousands, of views in a short amount of time.

To read the entire blog post, click here.

 

“Reedsy,” writes:

A blog tour is very much like a traditional book tour, where the author would go from town to town to sign their books and meet new readers; except this time, you go from blog to blog. There are countless fiction and non-fiction blogs that have emerged in the past few years, all written by passionate readers who want to share their love of books with other readers. They post book reviews, launch announcements, and interviews with their favorite authors. To continue reading the article on Reedsy, click here.

 

“Bookmaster” for example gives us a hint on what it means to work on a Blog Tour by writing:

A blog book tour can be set up by a publicist, but if an author has self-published and doesn’t have a publicist, they can do the leg work themselves. The key is to find blogs that are relevant to the topic of the book that are interested in participating in the blog book tour. For example, cooking blogs would be the target if you wrote a cookbook and relationship blogs would be the target if you wrote a book that provided love advice. Depending on the topic of the book there could be an unlimited number of blogs, or there might only be a handful if the topic is extremely niche. Each book tour should include a manageable amount of blogs, as the tour requires a significant amount of time from the author. Even though it’s not an in person tour, there is still plenty of work that needs to be done. (The article can be found here)

 

Now: what interested me most is: How do I really organize a Blog Tour? Of course, there are several hints, tips, and tricks from different writers; the basic work seems more or less the same – several have apparently had super-success while others complained that their echo was insufficient.

One article that impressed me was an article, published by Penguin Random House.

For example, does the post answer important questions like:

• What are the benefits of putting your book on a blog tour?
• What types of books work best for blog tours?
• How can an author ensure his or her blog tour is a success?
• How can an author work with his or her publicist to set up an effective blog tour?

or

• What are some best practices when preparing for a blog tour?

The entire article can be read here:
http://authornews.penguinrandomhouse.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-organizing-a-blog-tour/

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By researching further into the topic, I found another impressive and informative post on Joel Friedlander’s Book Designer’s Blog. He published a guest post, 7 Top eBook Blog Tour Sites, written by Greg Strandberg.

Greg informs about seven eBook Tour Sites, gives prices, information and his opinion to them. I think it’s worth checking them out. He as well links their names to their websites. (For copyright reasons I cannot do this below.)

1. YA Bound Book Tours
2. Xpresso Book Tours
3. Enchanted Book Promotions
4. Bewitching Book Tours
5. Goddess Fish Promotions
6. Sage’s Blog Tours
7. Rockstar Book Tours

If you like to read his opinion about these Sites, please check them out on his article by clicking here.

Finally, after hours and hours of research, I found an excellent post, provided by Mixtus Media on

How To Set Up A Successful Blog Tour + A FREE Guide

They not only provide us with an 11-step-guide on how to organize a Blog Tour, they as well provide us with a free Blog Tour Worksheet.

STEP 1: IDENTIFY YOUR IDEAL READER
STEP 2: RESEARCH
STEP 3: CREATE A LIST
STEP 4: DETERMINE YOUR RESOURCES
STEP 5: FIGURE OUT YOUR TIMEFRAME
STEP 6: CONTACT BLOGGERS
STEP 7: Stay ORGANIZED
STEP 8: CONSIDER GIVEAWAYS
STEP 9: ANNOUNCE THE TOUR
STEP 10: FOLLOW THROUGH WITH THE DELIVERY
STEP 11: FOLLOW UP

Each step is carefully described. To download the Worksheet, which I did, you are first subscribing to their newsletter. But I doubt that’s a problem. They do have more interesting information on their blog. (I didn’t have problems to download their worksheet, just in case your virus program is sensitive. Mine is, and it has carefully scanned the file and found nothing.)

After all the information I had found on Blog Tours I would love to hear from experienced writers how they had found it to organize their blog tours. Is it easy, is it hard? Do you mind providing us with some extra tips, tricks, and hints?