Series Additions

After I had published ‘Soul Taker,’ I was told there were a few questions left open in my book, for example – what would happen to that angel Katie met with Raphael, Sundance?

The second book, ‘Sundance,’ answered those questions, but then I was asked if there was more to be read about the warriors in that book… it can’t be that they… and so on.

I admit I was a bit surprised at first. I know tons of books where we have, as usually, protagonists, antagonists, sub-characters, and tons of ‘small’ characters that don’t have too much of a purpose, except being there for one or two scenes and then disappear. We all know ‘the maid’ or ‘the butler’ or ‘the mailman’ in many movies. The person enters a scene, does or even says something and leaves… but in my case, I got questioned about the future of some of the supporting characters. I first was confused but then finally decided to take it as a compliment. It seems, even my supporting characters are important enough to my readers that they’re interested in what happens to them!

But let’s get back to the additions to a book series.

See, ‘The Council Of Twelve’ series is quite well planned. A book ‘in-between’ is basically impossible. But what I could do is write some ‘extra stories.’  The first word that came to my mind was: Sequel. From what I learned in the meantime, that is not exactly what these additions to an existing series would be.

According to Jim Henry, on his homepage jimhenry.conlang.org, the definition of a sequel would be:

“Sequel” (from Latin “sequela”) originally seems to have meant “what happens next”; later it took on the additional meaning of “a story whose events take place later in the same imagined history as a certain other story” — usually with reference to novels, but also short stories, epic poems, and films.

He did mention different definitions of additional stories as well. According to Jim Henry, Wikipedia defines “interquel” as a story taking place between two previously published ones. Jeffrey Henning has a different definition of “interquel,” basically the same as Jim Henry’s coinage “paraquel” (see below).

paraquel
a story that takes place simultaneously with a certain other story
circumquel
a story that takes place partly before, partly after a certain other story
inquel
a story that takes place during a gap in some other story’s narrative

Now, armed with all that information about the different ‘extra-stories,’ will I be writing anything then? And if yes, why? I’ll tell you:

I was asked about these character’s stories – and I think, if these ‘supporting characters’ are so very important to my readers, I will tell their story too.

However, I decided to ‘collect’ the additional stories in an extra book. To tell you the truth, I’m not that much into finding out whether they are inquels, interquels or ‘whatever’-quels, as long as my readers love the characters and stories, but I promise, they will be extraordinary and they will make my supporting characters the center of their own story’s universe. They might not be novels or novellas, they might be novelettes – but they will introduce you to a wonderful personality which tells you how the character is linked to ‘The Council Of Twelve,’ and I’m convinced you will love them.

Thank you to those who asked me to tell their tale as well. I’m very honored!

 

 

10 thoughts on “Series Additions

  1. Like you, I really do not know what to call an interlinked book nor do I really care but what I can tell you is that many readers enjoy synchronicity between books. Many of my most liked characters crop up in “Other” books for cameo roles and perhaps spend only a page or two in that “Other”.
    I would love to tell you that this was completely my own idea but it is not.

    Micheal Moorcock did this for many years before I started writing; Characters from many of his books would pop up randomly in other novels, A stranger met on the road, a dream or vision depicting one or many characters from other novels, a “conjunction of the sphere’s” in his multiverse.
    Many side characters such as Una Presson, Karl Glouger, Hawkmoon etc eventually had their own novels some of which even sold well. So go for it. I think that many will enjoy it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. AJ, I’ve always taken it as a high compliment when one of my readers asks if I’m going to do a story about one of the supporting characters in my book. And I actually did create stories about two minor characters from earlier books, twice.

    My books are still stand alone, but have references back to the earlier stories. The first one was a relatively minor character who played the part of healing the broken heart of another more prominent character in the earlier story. The second was actually a supporting character of the villain in an earlier story. That latter one was a challenge, but I’m glad I wrote it.

    Each of those formerly minor characters became the MC of the later book.

    One thing I did learn from those experiences was that I never want to do it again. It was way too difficult to keep all the minor details of the characters straight, as well as the timing of events mentioned in both stories. I decided to write completely new tales from then on, and I enjoy that much better. But we each have to follow our own heart on this.

    Bottom line is this. When your readers love your minor characters, you know you’re doing a great job with the story, and the characters are not just filler. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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