Why I Stopped Questioning My Own Writing Process #writer – Written By Lucy Mitchell

Thanks for a great article about other writer’s writing process vs. our own. I think I still need to learn how to do what you did already.


I love experiencing what I call a writing epiphany. They’re not regular occurrences and I think this is what makes them so wonderful. Mine always seem to occur while I am in my little car on my way to work at around seven in the morning. This is the time of the day when my brain will be chewing over an aspect of my WIP or a writing issue and then it will make a shocking revelation. I will then whisper, ‘OMG’, squeal with delight as everything has suddenly made sense, babble about the epiphany to myself for a mile or so and then turn up my 80’s hits for a celebratory sing-song. My day at work will then be a breeze. As I said above these are NOT regular occurrences.

Well, I had one of these moments a few weeks ago. I realized it was time to stop…

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What did Medieval People Really Wear? – Written By Nicholas Rossis

Nicholas Rossis provided us with a very interesting and highly educating blog post about medieval wardrobe – reality vs. Hollywood. Even though I called the article educating and interesting, which it is – I still think Nicholas just ruined my day. (Just kidding!)


Contrary to popular belief, people in the Middle Ages loved color – and could afford it. They also liked to be, well, naked. Which makes sense, considering how much Medieval people liked throwing rotten vegetables at each other.

Some people take the term “Dark Ages” a little too literally. There is a notion in popular culture that the Medieval Period was a time when everyone lived in absolute poverty, wore clothes that looked like they were sewn together by a 6-year-old, and bathed zero times during their entire lives. The dark-filtered movies and shows depicting the Medieval period are supposed to symbolically reflect how bleak everyone’s life was.

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29 Great USA Writing Conferences in March 2020 – Written By Erica Verrillo

Thank you very much for your great and helpful articles, Erica! We really appreciate your hard work!


 

Conferences are not only the best way to meet agents, get tips from other writers, and learn about the publishing industry, they make you feel like a writer. We all need community, and this is how we, as writers, get the necessary incentive to keep writing.

All of these conferences and workshops charge tuition, but some offer financial assistance. There are deadlines for applying for aid, so make sure you plan ahead.

Get Full Details HERE

 

Writing Legal Fiction: 4 Research Tips – Written By K.M. Weiland

K. M. Weiland gives us four interesting research tips when writing legal fiction. Thanks so much for the advice!


On television crime dramas, DNA comes back in three minutes, crimes are solved in less than forty-two minutes, and defendants always confess to everything right there on the stand in front of judge and jury.

While I can see the entertainment value in this type of show, I often want to hurl my remote at the television. Why? Because none of it is an accurate portrayal of the judicial system and how it works.

As someone who’s worked in the legal field for over two decades, it’s beyond frustrating.

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Quiet: Have We Forgotten to Be Still in a World That Never Stops? – Written By Kristen Lamb

Today I discovered that article on Kristen Lamb’s blog, a post I can fully relate to. She speaks from my heart! Thank you for that post, Kristen!


quiet, busy, productivity, business culture, Kristen Lamb, benefits of rest, rest and creativity, burnout, stress

Quiet. It’s a rather strange experience if one has grown too accustomed to the go-go-go pace of the modern world.

Recently—well, not too recently—my grandfather died. I was raised by my grandparents, so when a week and a half before Christmas he suddenly passed away? It was a blow.

Sure, he was 93. But, he was feisty like me and was far from the typical elderly person. He’d golfed (and played the entire course) until he was 90 and even a bit past that. He played cards and continued to battle crabgrass in triple-digit Texas summer heat armed with only a hand-sharpened garden hoe.

I kid you not, I went to visit one day and my sweat-soaked grandfather was digging up holly shrubs in 102 degree heat. He was almost 90 at the time. I suppose part of me expected he’d live forever. I’d at least expected to have him until 100.

Anyway, I caught a cold this past October, which, because I refused to slow down ‘enough’—which ‘slow down enough’ might as well be a friggin’ Leprechaun for me since I’ve yet to spot it—the cold turned into bronchitis in November.

This already had me down.

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Making a clean break – Written By Jamie Fessenden

Dear Friends and Fellow Authors

I read this blog post by Jamie Fessenden today. To the ones who don’t know him: Jamie Fessenden is a very talented LGBTQ author whose books I love! I’m sure we all can support him when he re-starts as an Indie author. Please, hop over to his blog and let him know when you’re prepared to help.

Thank you!


I’m sad to report I’ve had to break away from Dreamspinner Press. The publisher has been having financial difficulties for a while, and over the past year, authors haven’t been receiving their royalties—at least, not consistently. I still hold out hope that they’ll get things in order and return to being the reliable press they’ve been for most of the decade I’ve worked with them, but the hit they’ve taken to their reputation means it’s in my best interest to step away. The last book I had released through them (Small Town Sonata) sold very badly. It could be the book, of course, but there are a lot of factors to consider. Many readers are boycotting DSP books and a lot of review sites won’t review them.

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