Book Marketing during Covid-19 – Written By Tim Grahl

This might be an article that interests many of us. Thank you for featuring that sensitive subject, Tim!


on Book Launch:

Over the last few days, I’ve fielded a lot of questions about what to do with book marketing during this COVID-19 pandemic.

I’ve got all this time, what should I do with it?

Is it rude to try to market right now?

Am I going to annoy people if I do outreach?

In this article, I’m going to walk you through do’s and don’ts of how to put a book marketing silver lining around this world crisis.

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A shout out to women over forty! – Courtesy of Floridaborne

I got this from the ‘Two on a Rant’ blog. The post is so hilarious, I just had to re-blog it. Thanks so much for sharing it!


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s not a secret that I’m over forty, (and possibly, maybe, over fifty). So, when I saw this cute and funny post from Women Over Forty, I felt an immediate love for Andy Rooney.

Therefore, I accepted Women Over Forty’s invitation to reblog it.
Women Over 40……

In case you missed it on 60 Minutes, this is what Andy Rooney thinks about women over 40:

“As I grow in age, I value women over 40 most of all. Here are just a few reasons why:

A woman over 40 will never wake you in the middle of the night and ask, ‘What are you thinking?’ She doesn’t care what you think.

If a woman over 40 doesn’t want to watch the game, she doesn’t sit around whining about it. She does something she wants to do, and it’s usually more interesting.

Women over 40 are dignified. They seldom have a screaming match with you at the opera or in the middle of an expensive restaurant. Of course, if you deserve it, they won’t hesitate to shoot you if they think they can get away with it.

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Putting Cliffhangers in a Series – Written By Charles Yallowitz

Charles Yallowitz, over at ‘Legends of Windemere’ published a blog post about cliffhangers in a series. Thank you very much for your great post, Charles.


This came up in conversation and I thought about while coming to the end of War of Nytefall: Eradication. When writing a series, you tend to have 3 types of books.

 

 

  1. The opener, which introduces at least some characters, begins world building, and may hint at the main plot.
  2. The finale, which closes up all or most of the plot lines.
  3. Everything in the middle, which I tend to call ‘Bridge Books’. They have their own internal adventure while carrying what was established in the previous books into the next one. You don’t always bring all of the subplots and characters through a bridge book, but you do enough that the main plot can continue.

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Tips for working at home aka how to survive being a shut-in #WriterWednesday #QuarantineLife #AuthorToolboxBlogHop – Written By D.E. Haggerty

D. E. Haggerty gives us excellent advice on how to spend our time and workload at home during the quarantine and the ‘shut-in’ phase. Thank you, D.E. for your tips and tricks.


Sounds awesome, doesn’t it? Work from home. No boss breathing down your neck. No need to get dressed in business clothes. Hell, no need to shower or get out of your pj’s if you don’t want to. But as I’ve learned over the years as a work-at-home writer, it’s not as easy as it seems. And now many of you are forced to work at home, too.

Do not panic! I’m here to help with some tips and tricks for working at home. Because – despite initially missing colleagues and some gossip by the water cooler – I can’t even imagine ever having to go into an office. Blech!

Anyway, there are things you can do to make working at home not feel like you’re a prisoner in your own home. Here they are:

  1. Have a schedule…

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

 

 

 

 

5 Mistakes When Writing Flashbacks in Memoir (and Fiction) – Written By Sarah Chauncey

This is an interesting and well-written post on Jane Friedman’s blog. Sarah Chauncey wrote about flashbacks in books and how many of us make mistakes when writing them in our story. Thank you very much for your information, Sarah.


Flashbacks are scenes that take place prior to the narrative arc of a story. They can illuminate any number of story elements, from revealing the origins of an unusual habit to new information about a relationship. Flashbacks can give the reader a depth of context not available in the primary narrative.

Alternately, flashbacks can help the reader understand your reaction to an event in the primary timeline. For example, maybe you had a fight with your spouse, and the exchange reminded you of how you used to cower in your closet when your parents fought. While you can tell with that line, showing via a flashback can be more engaging for the reader.

However, flashbacks can be tricky to write. Written unskillfully, flashbacks can leave a reader disoriented and disengaged.

What follows are the five mistakes I see most often in memoir manuscripts, though these principles are also relevant to fiction. If you’re writing fiction, just substitute “your main character” for “you.”

Continue reading HERE