The Council Of Twelve Series – What Should Be Next?

The Council of Twelve series so far includes the first three books in the series.

You can find them here:

Katie is the sweetest angel we can imagine, a fantastic consort, emotionally stable, and still responsible, helpful, and caring. She’s Raphael’s perfect second half.

Sundance is the second female angel we meet in the series. She’s an exceptional angel in many ways, the first warrior angel in three centuries, she is blessed with many gifts and talented beyond her young age.

Zepheira is a strong-willed, stubborn woman, so far the fiercest female character in the series. As a half-angel, she is a raw diamond, and due to her nature, the only one holding Uriel’s fire.

During the entire series, we will recognize recurring characters and meeting new ones; in particular, are we going to meet ‘The Council of Twelve,’ including the twelve most powerful individuals existing, each one of them holding unique talents and powers.

Michael, Raphael, Gabriel, Uriel, Benadrel, Zachariel, Deonur, Tsechirel, Santanael, Centriel, Anghariel, and Simael.

The fight Good vs. Evil is present within each book, the tension climbs higher with each story.

In your opinion, what should happen next? Tell me in the comment. If you have an idea, want to write a short story that you think might fit the series, write it, please and send it to me: aurorajean.alexander@aol.com. Write ‘The Council of Twelve series on Writer’s Treasure Chest’ in the subject line.

I look forward to your emails.

Authors, Do You Rehearse Fighting Scenes Before You Write Them?

A few days ago, I was working on a complicated fighting scene between two supernatural beings in book #8 in ‘The Council Of Twelve’ series.

To describe the fight accurately, I was getting up, using a wooden kitchen spoon to technically rehearse every step of the battle, before sitting down and explaining the movement and natural body reaction on the ‘theoretically’ inflicted pain.

It took me close to four hours for a fight that took a mere two pages to write.  And yes, the argument does include a bit of pain, wings, bruises, and a severe knee injury.

Now, being a martial artist myself might have helped me big time to take this challenge on and solve the problem the way I did. But other writers might not have that [indeed minimal] advantage. How are they doing it? Is their fantasy more extended than mine?

Previously I mentioned my fighting scene took up about two pages of the book. Generally, that is a lot of room for one scene. But that is why I rehearsed. I had to make sure the fight was thrilling and still described well in an imaginative short manner.

Fighting scenes in books are incredibly different from fighting scenes in movies. Compared to what we see, reading the fight in a book has to tickle our own imagination. We don’t follow a fighter with our eyes… we follow him/her with our mind.

To see Bruce Lee fighting twenty opponents to the same time and describing the same scene in words, would need our book ten to twelve pages. To a reader, that would be incredibly boring. Most readers would never read through the entire fight. It would be a complete waste of time and effort. A reader would only jump the pages to the end of the battle. Most of them are interested in who wins.

Therefore I had to shorten something that usually takes about ten to fifteen minutes in a movie to two pages in my book. To catch the essential things in my fight, I was rehearsing to myself.

 

As an author, how do you write fighting scenes? Do you rehearse too? And as a reader, do you enjoy reading fighting scenes, and if yes, how long should they be to not bore you out of your skin? Thank you for telling us in the comments.

5 things you need to know about your characters before you write your novel – Written By M. L. Davis

Thank you, M. L. Davis on the ‘Uninspired Writer’ blog, for your article about characters.

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Creating characters is one of the most exciting parts of novel writing. Getting to know your heroes, your villains, your story’s main players is a lot of fun. You’ll learn more about them as you write, at that exploration is the best way to understand them completely. But before you start writing, there are five things you need to know about them. Take a look:

Names
Starting simply, it’s very helpful to have character names before you start. I can’t pretend I’ve not written ‘NAME HERE’ for minor characters in early drafts, but with your key players it’s easier to have the names early on. Baby name books/websites are great for this, as you have unlimited options and they tend to include origins and name meanings too.

Continue Reading Here

 

You Will Always Get Some Bad Amazon Book Reviews – Written By Derek Haines

Thank you very much for this post about bad Amazon book reviews. We all appreciate your work, Derek Haines.

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on Just Publishing Advice:

They are infuriating, annoying, and often stupid. They are unfair, depressing, and disheartening.

But bad book reviews are one of the harsh realities of being a published author today.

If you’re a seasoned author, you know what I’m talking about.

If you are a new author who is about to publish your first book, you will come to know soon enough.

In This Article

Customer reviews
A book review asks; does the book work for me?
A customer review is different
The worst of the worst
Free ebooks can attract negative reviews
Here we go again!
It’s only a review
Conclusion

Continue reading HERE

4 UK Agents Seeking Crime Fiction, Nonfiction, SFF, Literary Fiction, Memoir and more – Written By Erica Verrillo

Erica Verillo, thank you for providing us with the names and information of four UK agents seeking our work! We really appreciate it!

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on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are four UK agents expanding their client lists.

Mark “Stan” Stanton is always on the lookout for new crime writers. He is actively searching for new novelists and non-fiction projects.

Jamie Cowen is looking for genre fiction of all kinds, including crime, thrillers, SF, fantasy and horror, and all fiction for young adults. He is also looking for sport-related non-fiction, and commercial narrative non-fiction, and is keen to see submissions of all genres from BAME and LGBTQ writers.

Julian Alexander represents fiction and nonfiction of all kinds, from history and medicine, heartwarming memoir, to illustrated books, to edgy detective novels and fast paced thrillers.

John Ash is seeking literary fiction, ambitious fantasy, and anything with a dark vein of humour running through it. On the non-fiction side, he loves to read literary and unusual narrative non-fiction and memoir, and is especially interested in writing on music, cultural history, nature and art.

Always check the agency website and agent bio before submitting. Agents can switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change.

Get Full Details HERE

7 Misconceptions About Being a Writer – Written By K.M. Weiland…

K. M. Weiland provides us with a blog post describing misconceptions about being a writer. Thank you very much, K. M. Weiland!

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on Helping Writers become Authors:

Like any good story, the writing life is a tale of deceptive depth.

At first glance, it offers up a shiny, artsy, fun cover. Become a Writer! its title beckons, and its first chapters lure us in by fulfilling all these initial promises.

But the deeper we get, the further we go, the more we realize there’s more to this story than meets the eye.

There’s more adventure, more conflict, more drama, and more comedy than we could ever have realized.

In short, there are many different misconceptions about being a writer.

Continue reading HERE

What to write when you can’t “write what you know.” – Written By AdminBD…

AdminBD provides us with a few good tips and hints on Anne R. Allen’s blog. Thank you very much for this great article.

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on Anne R. Allen:

One of the primo, Number One “rules” for writers is write what you know.

Writing what you know is generally excellent advice for writers who are in the early stages of their careers. Knowing your setting — whether it’s geographical, professional,  familial, is one less issue you’ll have to face when you’re still not yet completely comfortable with fiction’s basic craft elements — narrative, backstory, plot, dialogue, character.

But—

What if you can’t — or don’t want to — write what you know?

Because —

Continue reading HERE

Soul Taker Secrets – Angel Wings

The Council of Twelve series is a YA fantasy/paranormal romance series where we meet celestial beings. The first book in the series is ‘Soul Taker’, where we meet the Council of Twelve, the most powerful individuals in existence, and the protagonist, Katie, a Guardian Angel-to-be. In the ‘Soul Taker Secrets’ category, I reveal the one or other ‘inside’ knowledge about The Council of Twelve, their consorts, and in this case, a little of their physical secrets.


Picture courtesy of https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/feathers-article/

Wing feathers

The wing feathers specialized for flight are characterized by uniform windproof surfaces, or vanes, on either side of the central shaft that is created by an interlocking microstructure. Also called remiges, these feathers are asymmetric with a shorter, less flexible leading edge that prevents mid-air twisting.

Amazon Parrot wing feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Tail feathers

Most tail feathers, or rectrices, feature an interlocking microstructure similar to wing feathers. Arranged in a fan shape, these feathers support precision steering in flight. Typically, birds have six pairs of feathers on the tail, which display increasing levels of asymmetry toward the outer pairs. In some birds, tail feathers have evolved into showy ornaments that are useless in flight.

Ruffed Grouse tail feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Contour feathers

Contour feathers are what you see covering the bird’s body and streamlining its shape. Arranged in an overlapping pattern like shingles, the waterproof tips are exposed to the elements, and the fluffy bases are tucked close to the body. Sometimes brilliantly colored or uniformly drab, contour feathers can also help the bird show off or stay camouflaged. Contour feathers on the wing, called coverts, shape it into an efficient airfoil by smoothing over the region where the flight feathers attached to the bone.

Helmeted Guineafowl contour feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Semiplume

Mostly hidden beneath other feathers on the body, semiplumes have a developed central rachis but no hooks on the barbules, creating a fluffy insulating structure.

Northern Cardinal semiplume feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Down

Similar to semiplumes with an even looser branching structure but little or no central rachis, down feathers, are relatively short and positioned closest to the body where they trap body heat.

Canada Goose down feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Filoplume

Short, simple feathers with few barbs, filoplumes function like mammal whiskers to sense the position of the contour feathers.

Common Poorwill filoplume feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Bristle

Bristles are the simplest feathers, with a stiff rachis that usually lacks barb branches. Most commonly found on the head, bristles may protect the bird’s eyes and face.

Domestic Chicken bristle feather illustration by Andrew Leach

(Source: https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/feathers-article/)


Now that we learned about the different feathers in the wings let’s look at the different wing-shapes.

Picture courtesy of https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/

In this picture, we can see the wing shaping feathers and their functionality.


Now, bird and angel wings basically have the same biological structure with one main difference. Their mobility is far more extended to guarantee the optimal function since, of course, angels don’t have tail feathers to brake, steer, and keep the balance of the wing carrier. And of course, they are much more reliable, due to the weight they have to lift.

Picture courtesy of Freepik.com