Too late for this year but perhaps next…? A competition for self-published authors – Written By Bridget Whelan

Bridget Wheelan informs us about a competition for self-published authors. Unfortunately for this year it’s already too late, but maybe next? Thank you, Bridget!

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August 31st is the deadline for the Kindle Storyteller Award which Amazon celebrates the best self-published story in the UK with a £20,000 cash prize.

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

 

I know that is still a month away, but you have to do an awful lot of work to make sure your story qualifies and readers are a crucial part in helping to choose the shortlist. Customer feedback is based on such factors as quality of reviews, sales and pages read in Kindle Unlimited. I underlined the word quality because Amazon seem to be flagging up that 50 ‘It’s really great‘ reviews won’t cut it. What you really need is quality AND quantity.

To qualify you need to publish on KDP, Amazon’s publishing arm in both eBook and paperback versions. The paperback version of your book must be at least 24 pages long and the qualifying period for…

CONTINUE READING HERE

How To Republish A Book For Self-Published Authors – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines informs us in his article about how to republish a book for self-published authors. Thank you so very much for all your hard work, Derek!

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on Just Publishing Advice:

Can a self-published book be republished?

Yes, if you have self-published a book, you can update it at any time and as often as you like.

You can change, modify, merge, or improve your book for both ebook and print versions.

You can update the cover design, change your genre and category listings and fine-tune, or find new keyword listings.

In This Article

How to republish a book
The big advantage of self-publishing
It’s always possible to improve a book
Add images
Add links to an ebook
Check your formatting
Choose better categories and keywords
There is always room for improvement
Unpublish and republish
Summary

Continue reading HERE

How to show the emotions of non-viewpoint characters – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby published a fascinating article about the emotions of non-viewpoint characters and how to show them without screwing up. Thank you, Louise!

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Non-viewpoint characters have emotions too.

But how do we show them without head-hopping?

The answer lies in mastering observable behaviour.

Continue reading HERE

 

The Binge-Worthy Book Festival Week 1! – Written By Charles Yallowitz

Charles Yallowitz, owner of ‘The Legends of Windemere’ blog, informs us about ‘The Binge-Worthy Book Festival. Thank you, Charles!

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As I mentioned on my Saturday post, N.N. Light is hosting a Binge-Worthy Book Festival through the month of August.  Every weekday will have a new set of authors.  Legends of Windemere: Beginning of a Hero is on for today alongside others of various genres.  It’s a great selection, so I recommend checking it every day.  There are contests you can enter as well.

Click here for the  Festival!

Clicker here for the Rafflecopter!

CONTINUE READING HERE

5 Ways A Timeline Helps You Write Your Novel – Written By M. L. Davis

M. L. Davis provides us with an excellent article about how a timeline helps us write our novel. We can find the post published on the ‘Uninspired Writers’ blog. Thank you, M. L. Davis

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Some writers are plotters. Others are pantsers. There’s no right way to do it. There are pros and cons to plotting, and it’s up to you to decide what works best. Personally, I’m a plotter. Typically, my plotting consists of a basic outline and little else. It worked for two novels. But on my third, I was struggling. I spent ages trying to figure out why my story wouldn’t work before it hit me. I’d not sussed out the timeline, not properly. And once I had, it changed everything. As such, I’m sharing 5 ways that a timeline helps you write your novel.

Figuring out backstory
Not all backstory needs to be written. I would even go as far as to say most backstory doesn’t need to be written. But as a writer, it’s helpful to know where things started for your characters. It’s important to know what happened before the events of the first chapter. This way, you know what to include and what to omit. It also enables you to add depth to your characters, as undoubtedly their past has shaped them.
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Avoiding plot holes
A number of things can cause plot holes, and time is definitely one of them. If your characters and their story are to be believable, then time must move in the way it should. Even if your fictional world has it’s own concept of time, you should adhere to the rules you set for it. Savvy readers are likely to pick up on things that don’t flow naturally.

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Blogger’s Books: Darlene Foster – On BeetleyPete’s Blog

On BeetleyPete’s blog we can find the introduction of a very familiar and beloved writer: Darlene Foster.

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It is my pleasure to feature a book from Canadian writer and blogger, Darlene.

This is the latest in her very popular ‘Amanda’ series. This time, our heroine is in Holland.

Here is Darlene’s bio.

Darlene Foster is a Canadian author who has written the popular Amanda Travels series, featuring a spunky twelve-year-old who loves to travel to unique places where she encounters mystery and adventure while learning about another culture. Readers of all ages enjoy travelling with Amanda as she unravels one mystery after another in various countries. Darlene has won prizes for her short stories and a number of them have been published in anthologies. She has also written a bi-lingual book for English/Spanish readers.

Darlene grew up on a ranch near Medicine Hat, Alberta, where her love of reading inspired her to travel the world and write stories. Over the years she held wonderful jobs such as an employment counsellor, ESL teacher, recruiter, and retail manager, and wrote whenever she had a few spare minutes. She is now retired and has a home in Spain where she writes full time. When not travelling, meeting interesting people, and collecting ideas for her books, she likes to spend time with her husband and entertaining dog, Dot.

Her books include: Amanda in Arabia: The Perfume Flask, Amanda in Spain: The Girl in The Painting, Amanda in England: The Missing Novel, Amanda in Alberta: The Writing on the Stone, Amanda on The Danube: The Sounds of Music, Amanda in New Mexico: Ghosts in the Wind, and Amanda in Holland: Missing in Action. Amanda in Malta: The Sleeping Lady will be released in the spring of 2021.

CONTINUE READING HERE

Why Does A Romantic Book End At The ‘Happily Ever After?’

Picture courtesy of Google.com


I suspect we all know the touching moment we waited for after we were going through the adventures of the romantic couple. We smiled with them when they found each other. We were happy with them when they fell in love. We cried with them when they lost each other because of some horrible misunderstanding. And, of course, we celebrated when they found each other again, kissed and ‘lived happily ever after.’

And now?

Don’t we ask ourselves how their wedding looked like? How are their families, how their friends? Don’t we wish sometimes we could play a ‘fly on the wall’ seeing how their relationship develops when challenged by marriage?

And that’s when my imagination runs wild.

Of course, it would be amazing and heartwarming to see their wedding. Because weddings are always touching and celebrating and viewing the ‘good’ in everything and everybody.

And then our couple moves in with each other. Both go to work… every morning she makes her favorite coffee, every morning he tells her that this particular brand gives him bad reflux. Then they climb in their own cars and drive off, only to see each other late at night, due to overtime and traffic jams.

She cooks, but he’s not home. Disappointed, she covers his meal and puts it away in the refrigerator, leaving him a note before she goes to bed. He comes home late, makes himself a sandwich because he can’t stand that particular dish, and never dared to tell her.

The weekends they often spend with their in-laws’ camping or in the one or other backyard with a barbecue. They can’t go on vacation… because they can’t get off the same time – and of course, they cannot stay away from work longer than a weekend.

Even though everyone waits for them to announce that they are expecting, that never happens because both are too busy to make money and soon buy their own house… Unfortunately, they don’t realize they are waiting too long until she’s in her forties and finally decides it might be too risky to have a child now.

Occasionally they’re going out for dinner, but mostly they don’t have to say much to each other unless they discuss the job… and then it’s Monday, and the routine starts from scratch.

They might buy the house everybody expects them to buy. It’s a breathtaking museum, but they’re too busy with their job to enjoy it… it’s not a home, it’s just a status symbol. And they both continue working.

And at one point they realize… they don’t have that much to say to each other. They don’t know, do we actually know each other? Or did we just rush into our marriage because everybody expected us to; our families, the readers…

Basically, their marriage is the wrong coffee, and a woman who cannot cook… it’s everything everyone expects, but to them, it’s just routine and boredom.

And that’s why a romantic book usually ends with the kiss and the ‘happily ever after.’