Don’t start a scene without these four essential elements – Written By Nathan Bransford

Writers often don’t pay quite enough attention to how they start their chapters.

Starting a new chapter is kind of like starting a new mini-novel. Some time has likely elapsed since the end of the previous chapter, and we might also be shifting to a new physical location. We’re starting somewhat fresh, and it’s useful to help the reader get their bearings.

But even aside from just establishing where we are with good physical description and how much time has elapsed, there are four magic elements that are incredibly useful to deploy at the start of every chapter to help orient the reader within the story.

If you make sure these four elements are present at the start of every chapter you almost can’t help but write a good one.

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36 Tips for Writing Just About Anything – Written By Melissa Donovan

on Writing Forward:

There’s a lot more to writing than typing words.

Writing well takes years of study, practice, and experience. It requires diligence, attention to detail, and dedication to the craft. Each project has a unique set of requirements and different types of writing have different rules.

For example, when we’re writing fiction, we have one set of concerns (character, plot, and setting, to name a few), and when we’re writing poetry, we have en entirely different set of issues to deal with.

Writing becomes natural with practice, but there are countless elements to deal with in any given project.

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How Did They Make Iron in the Iron Age? – Written By Nicholas Rossis

The Iron Age (800 BC-100 AD) took its name from, well, iron. This kickstarted a number of technological and social changes, with centuries-old Bronze Age (2200-800 BC) civilizations based on copper and tin falling prey to invincible newcomers who wielded formidable iron weapons.

But how did people make iron in the first place? Did they suddenly have access to technology that could raise the temperature high enough to melt iron?

Well, no. Instead, people came up with an ingenious way of using existing technology in a radically different way, as Jason Almendra explains on Quora. They sourced the metal from bog iron or iron ore, both of which had been known for centuries. Now, however, they realized they could ground this to a powder. They then lit a bloomery with charcoal and raised the temperature using bellows.

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Fundamentals of Writing: Character Depth – who do they think they are? #amwriting – Written By Connie J. Jasperson

Depth is a vast word, a sea of information created of layers. It is complex, intense, and profound. Characters with depth feel solid, alive, as real as your best friend.

depth-of-character

To achieve a sense of depth, we begin with simplicity. Each character’s sub-story must be built upon who these characters think they are.

One of the most useful seminars I’ve ever attended was given by a Romance writer. He is a strong proponent of assigning verbs and nouns to each character at the outset as a way to get inside their heads.

If there is one thing Romance authors understand, it is how to create a strong impression of character.

When I plan a character, I make a simple word picture of them. The word picture is made of a verb and a noun, the two words that best describe each person. We want to know the good things about these characters, so we assign nouns that tell us how they see themselves at the story’s outset.

We also look at sub-nouns and synonyms, so put your thesaurus to work. In my book, Julian Lackland, I had four characters with significant roles, so I assigned them nouns that describe their principal defining quality.

This noun is the core characteristic thread that stays with them, is challenged by events, and either wins in the end or is their downfall.

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WHAT’S UP, Pat Garcia? – Written By Patricia Garcia

I seem to have disappeared after my book release, but I haven’t. I have been taking classes, writing feverishly on five submissions for writing contests, and preparing my marketing plan for Turn The Light On so that I could get it into motion. There were many things that I had to learn also about YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook that I hadn’t known before the book was published, and I have had fun learning these things most of the time.

Today, I am revealing the book trailer for Turn The Light On. Many thanks to 4WillsPublishing. They have been marvelous in setting my desires into the type of book trailer I wanted to have.

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