Submitting to Contests vs. Submitting to Magazines and Anthologies #amwriting – Written By Connie J. Jasperson

One question I frequently see in various writers’ forums, is “how can an indie get their name out there and gain fans for their work?”

WritingCraft_short-story

My answer is simple. We write short stories and submit them to magazines, anthologies, and contests.

Every time your short work is published or places well in a contest, you stand the chance of getting your name out there and it’s nice to have a little extra cash in your pocket.

Despite the changes in the publishing industry as a whole, writing short stories is still the way to get your foot in the door and increase your visibility. Anthology calls from traditional large publishing houses and reputable small and mid-size publishers that are willing to pay for your work are sometimes open to new authors.

Also, magazines that are SFWA approved regularly post open calls for submission, so it pays to check each magazine and publisher’s website for opportunities.

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Submitting to contests is good too. If you have a story that was a contest winner, you may be able to sell it to the right publication.

Writing for anthologies and contests have similar requirements. You must learn how to write to a specific length. Often, you must make use of a specific theme, one that may not be of your choosing.

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Medieval Name Generators – Written By Nicholas C. Rossis

You may recall my previous posts on naming your characters (Old Anglo-Saxon Character NamesFree Online Character Name Generators, and Naming your Characters the Easy Way).

There is now a new character naming tool on Reedsy, the Medieval Name Generator

If you’re struggling to come up with your own medieval name, that’s what this medieval name generator is for. Having stood the test of time, these medieval names now stand at the ready for your use.

Here are some tips for you to consider while using this medieval name generator:

  • Experiment with the spelling of the name. The language was changing in the medieval period and what’s exciting is that many forms of a given name might exist. For your reference, this medieval name generator uses the standardized spelling of the name.
  • Consider the meaning of the surname when using a medieval name. Surnames in the Middle Ages were greatly significant and could describe professions, places, trades, nationalities, or statuses.
  • Depending on the background of your character, you may want to explore several regions in the Middle Ages. This medieval name generator will equip you with medieval names from Old Norse, Old Roman, Old Old Celtic, and Old English cultures.

CONTINUE READING HERE

The Why and How of Choosing a Genre – Written By Jenny Hansen

on Writers in the Storm:

Over the last few years, I’ve thought a lot about genre. The differences between them and why and how we choose our preferred genre to write in. Some writers are solidly in a certain genre camp and others straddle two or more genres.

Examples of popular “straddlers” – The Hunger Games series, the Outlander series, books by J.D. Robb.

I believe one of the reasons many authors have moved to genres like young adult (YA) or women’s fiction (WF) is that the definitions of those two transcend traditional genres. For example, in addition to the other straddling achieved by the Hunger Games series, it is also classified as YA because of the age of the main character. (YA protags are usually in the 14-21 range.)

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Nods, Smiles, and Frowns: How Can We Avoid “Talking Heads”…and Cliches? – Written By Jami Gold

on Writers Helping Writers:

Context is often an underappreciated element of our writing because when notdone well, a context-filled passage can become a tell-not-show info dump. However, context is essential for most aspects of writing, from attributing dialogue and establishing stakes to evoking emotions and anchoring readers within a setting.

For that last situation, without context to “set the scene,” readers can struggle to visualize and fully immerse themselves in our stories. So let’s dig into this idea: How can we set the scene throughout our story and avoid common problems?

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Are There Any Celtic Words in English? – Written By Nicholas C. Rossis

400-year-old labyrinth carvings on the rocks in Rocky Valley, North Cornwall, England

Long-time followers of my blog may remember my post on the origins of English. The language tree in that post shows that English is largely derived from Germanic, specifically Anglo-Frisian.

So, where are the Celts? Are there no Celtic words in English?

As several of Quora answers explain, there are several – but far fewer than might be expected. Take one of my favorite British English colloquialisms, “smashing,” which is used to mean “really rather good.” Smashing may actually be an Anglicization of the Scottish Gaelic phrase is math sin, “that is good” (although some linguists question that).

The English word “twig” in the sense of suddenly catch on, and the hippy word “dig,” meaning to be really involved in, both come from Scots Gaelic tuig, understand.

Then there are several irish, Celtic, and Cymraeg (Welsh) words that have made their way into modern English, such as smithereens (smidrín), bog, galore (go leor), spree, slew, brogue (a type of shoe; brogue means shoe). Or banshee, breeches, whisky (uisce), clan, lug (ear), slob (slab), phony (fáinne), slogan (sluagh-ghairm), and gob (mouth). Or how about snug from snog, “good.”

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