Unique Advice To Aspiring Writers

Picture courtesy of Goodreads.com

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When I discovered this quote, I was laughing out loudly. Of course, the name ‘Dorothy Parker’ was anchored somewhere in the back of my head. I remember I got different information about her. Some say she’s been known more for her impertinence than her writing. Others admire her for her wit, guts, strength and personality, and sense of style, writing, and adventure. I belong to the second group.

As a quick side note, The Elements of Style is a book written by William Strunk jr. and E. B. White and is described as THE classic style manual. I read the book several times and still consult it occasionally. I love the tone it’s written in, and it has helped me many times. I’m convinced it had helped many other writers too.

(Can be ordered @Amazon)


There are many recommendations for new writers.

  • No matter how hard it will be, never give up
  • Start writing; a book doesn’t write itself.
  • If you don’t start, you won’t get it done
  • The writing itself is only a tiny part of what being a writer means

Of course, there are so many more examples, but those are the ones I heard most, with minor variations, of course.

Encouraging new writers is a good thing. Being honest about the writing is another one. Writing in Dorothy Parker’s time was quite different from now, with our possibility of self-publishing. One can say it’s far easier today to see your own story published. In many ways, that’s true. But also, the entire process of self-publishing is often very much underestimated!

  • Writing
  • Editing
  • Formatting
  • Copyright
  • Book Cover
  • Release
  • Trailer
  • Marketing

Every single step of the way is a process in itself. Self-publishing does not mean you can sit down, write whatever you feel like, set it online, and become famous and wealthy. Don’t forget. There are millions of writers with the same idea – and enormous talent!

Self-publishing means you will have to deliver a nothing-less-than-impeccable final product! And part of that ‘writing process’ is quite costly. A self-drawn cover and Momma’s retired English Teacher’s editing won’t be sufficient. Formatting, copyright, cover, editing, trailer, marketing, it all needs funds. Throwing your book out there and expecting the money flowing into the bank account by the thousands is a utopia.

Even nowadays, self-published authors are still the step-children of the craft. The traditionally published authors with the agents are the ‘real’ authors. An author needs a thick skin and guts to deliver name and work out there.

Self-doubt and thoughts of giving up are a daily strain. Depression is widespread among writers, and only other writers can often understand what we are going through. Networking and supporting each other are essential and cannot start early enough in the process.

We want to read our fellow author’s work. We want to give them the famous pat on the back and want to tell them: “Well done!” We want to help and encourage, and many of us are fellow writers and lifelong friends! But we also need to face reality. We need to believe in ourselves. But also need to accept if the one or other story doesn’t work, isn’t as intriguing as we thought, or could be better if we’d take advice and the one or other suggestion.

That means, of course, the four initial recommendations above are still very accurate! And I’m convinced many more writers than just little old me are going to hear those. But it also means, as sassy as Dorothy Parker’s statement is, the one or other experienced writer can very much relate.


Dorothy Parker (née Rothschild; August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American poet, writer, critic, and satirist based in New York; she was best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th-century urban foibles.

From a conflicted and unhappy childhood, Parker rose to acclaim, both for her literary works published in such magazines as The New Yorker and as a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. Following the breakup of the circle, Parker traveled to Hollywood to pursue screenwriting. Her successes there, including two Academy Award nominations, were curtailed when her involvement in left-wing politics resulted in her being placed on the Hollywood blacklist.

One of her most famous screens was the one for the 1937 film ‘A Star Is Born’, which she wrote in cooperation with director William A. Wellman, Robert Carson and Alan Campbell, her husband. As we all know, the film has been remade three times: in 1954 (directed by George Cukor and starring Judy Garland and James Mason), in 1976 (directed by Frank Pierson and starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson) and in 2018 (starring Bradley Cooper, who also directed, and Lady Gaga).

Dismissive of her own talents, she deplored her reputation as a “wisecracker.” Nevertheless, both her literary output and reputation for sharp wit have endured. Some of her works have been set to music; adaptations notably include the operatic song cycle Hate Songs by composer Marcus Paus.

Parker died on June 7, 1967, the age of 73 of a heart attack, presumably caused by the alcohol addiction she suffered from for over a decade.

(Source: Wikipedia)


However, I don’t want to end this blog post on such a ‘severe’ and almost ‘sad’ note. Leave here with a big smile on your face, please! Let Dorothy Parker make you laugh before you leave:


Martini Quotes. QuotesGram


3 Mistakes To Avoid with Your Side Characters – Written By Sacha Black

On Writers Helping Writers:

Everybody loves their heroes, some people even love their villains. But it’s a rare author that actively loves and spends equal time on their side characters.

Sure, some of them are fun to write, but they’re not who the story is about, which is why so many of them are simply slapped on and ill-thought out.

Today, I’m going to help you combat that by giving you three mistakes to avoid when creating your side characters.

Continue reading HERE

Writing Character Descriptions that Hook Readers – Written by Angela Ackerman

on Writers in the Storm:

I think we can all agree that characters are the heart of a novel. We build worlds around our story’s cast, spend dozens of hours plundering their psyche to understand needs, motivations, and beliefs, and even envision complete backstories. Then, of course, we go on to produce tens of thousands of words about their vulnerabilities and strengths as they rise, fall, and rise again on the path to their goal. We also revise, dedicating yet more hours to ensure readers understand and care about our characters as much as do.

Yes, it’s fair to say we work hard to make sure our characters live and breathe on the page. But here’s the irony…in all that effort, many of us overlook or underutilize another important area of character description: their physical appearance.

It’s true, a character’s features and physicality can be hard to convey. We may not have a strong mental picture of them ourselves, or if we do, how to sum it all up economically. After all, at the start of the story when we need to provide details on a character’s appearance, we’re also juggling everything else we must show like the action, setting, circumstances, plus the character’s motivation, underlying problem, emotion, and so on.

So we find ourselves asking, does the character’s looks really matter? Isn’t it what’s inside that counts?

Yes…and no.

Continue reading HERE

Checklist: Preparing to Send Your Manuscript to an Editor – Written By Liam Carnahan

on Kindlepreneur:

So you’ve finished your manuscript? Your first instinct may be to celebrate, and there’s nothing wrong with that. It’s a big deal, and you should be proud of yourself.

But you’re not done yet.

After you finish the champagne, the next major step will be to hire a book editor. But you don’t want to jump to this step too early. Before you invest in a professional, there are a few things you need to do: take the time to revise, work with beta readers, and revise some more.

In this article, you will learn:

How to reread your manuscript and take notes about what is and isn’t working
How to revise your manuscript
How to find and send your manuscript to beta readers
Review and apply beta reader feedback
How to self-edit your manuscript
Find the right editor

Continue reading HERE

Maintaining an Author Blog is Easier Than You Think – Written by Anne R. Allen

Should all authors blog? Of course not. We’re all different and we write for different audiences. There are lots of ways to establish an online presence. Anne Rice does a good deal of publicity from her Facebook page, and Stephen King is big on Twitter. Cheryl Strayed and Elizabeth Gilbert communicate with fans on Instagram.

Would a blog work for you? It might. Blogging is the best way to make friends with Google (otherwise known as SEO or Search Engine Optimization.) That means readers can find you through search engines. In other words, a blog helps readers find you and your books.

Continue reading HERE

HELP SAM AND ROSCOE MOVE TO THEIR NEW HOME – Written By Juliette Kings

Most of my readers know that I belong to the amazing writing group Writers, Poets, and Deviants. We publish themed anthologies with the fund going to MS charities. We also support and mentor fellow writers. Our goal is to be supportive and celebrate the success of all of our writers, providing a hate free, negativity free, and safe writing community.

None of this would have been possible without writer and my friend Mandy White. Mandy gives us all moral support, makes us laugh, give expert advice on publishing and writing, edits our books, coordinates all of the anthologies, runs our publishing group, and keeps us going in so many ways – all without pay. She is not only a phenomenal horror writer, but a phenomenal human. 

Now Mandy need our help. Please see the message below, check the link, and help if you can.

CONTINUE READING HERE