The Best Part Of Telling A Story – Part III

April 14, 2022 I published the first part of this blog post series, April 28, the second part followed. This blog post series talks about the best part of telling a story. There are so many good parts, to me, each holds its own appeal. Let’s have a look at them again:

1. Drafting the plot

2. Finding a motive

3. Creating the protagonist and antagonist

4. Finding the perfect location

5. Thinking of plot twists

6. Create side characters

[7. Depending on the story, maybe even create a world]


Let’s take a look at creating the protagonist and antagonist. Of course, I’m not saying, there aren’t many other characters to create. Many writers will tell you that this is the part that holds the most fun. I tend to believe that myself.

To me, the creation of a new story is fun in its entirety. I love to do that, but the characters hold their special magic. Think about the wonderful opportunities! You can create a character that could be your best friend… you can form that character, until he or she reminds you of your best friend… or even start by taking your best friend as an example, or inspiration! Of course, there are endless opportunities for inspiration: on the street, within your family, friends, co-workers, or the barista in the coffee shop on the corner.

There are so many articles, blog posts, and ideas about character creation. ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest’ is blessed with presenting quite a few from different writers, right here. If you add ‘character’ to the search bar on the widgets, you will find them listed. To make it easy for you, I prepared the search ahead. You can click HERE. The one or other post was even written by me.

There are as many ways to create a character as there are writers. You will find my writing process descriptions here on ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest’. There is no right or wrong on how to do these things. Every writer has a particular process and, from what I found out, most likely will stick to that, once established.

As for me:

I have, of course, two different ways of creating my characters, depending on the book I write!

The Council of Twelve Series holds supernatural characters, which gives me the opportunity of creating whatever and however I like. Besides Katie and Sundance, the lead characters in the first two ‘The Council of Twelve’ series books ‘Soul Taker’, and ‘Sundance’, who both are angels,


Books three and four show us Zepheira, who has ram horns since they started to grow when she was a teenager, and Simin, who is a bounty hunter and holds her own secrets. Both women are immortal supernatural creatures.


When I started writing my current WIP, a crime novel, I realized, I didn’t have that freedom anymore. I still have the liberty to create whatever unusual character I please, but they have to fit into what we would call a ‘normal’ world and everyday life. It’s nevertheless a wonderful challenge, and still a lot of fun, but it is different. I have to work more with psychology, rather than with horns and wings, sulfur and fire.

Of course, next to the protagonist and antagonist, many other characters will show up in our books. But most of us writers don’t start to create them while preparing the book. In my stories, they just ‘wander’ into the book, and sometimes they wander out again…

How are you creating your characters? Is it the best part of writing a story for you? Tell us about your creative process when it comes to characters. We’re curious!

10 thoughts on “The Best Part Of Telling A Story – Part III

    1. You speak from my heart. (Even though I never gave birth)… my characters are quite some fun. I sometimes consider having them as a friend, or even enemy, and how that character would ‘survive’ out in the real world. That’s fun too.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. While I was taking writing classes, I got to know an actress who decided she’d like to try her hand at writing. She gave me the best advice about creating characters I’d received up to that point in my writing journey. She said, “Put yourself into the role of the character. Writing isn’t that much different than acting.” I’ve never forgotten it.

    Feel the person’s personality. You’ll begin to talk (dialogue) like that person. You’ll act (action beats) like that person. And each of your characters will be distinguished not only by you identifying them in the text, but by their own words and actions. It works.

    After eight books, I get comments all the time about how my readers love the characters. They fall in love with them. They hate them. They cry and laugh with them.

    Great topic, AJ.

    Liked by 1 person

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