The Blogger Recognition Award for Writer’s Treasure Chest

Storyteller (writer, filmmaker, public speaker) Mitch Teemley has nominated me for the Blogger Recognition Award and has really made my day! Thank you so much, Mitch. You know how to make a girl happy, don’t you?  (Did I just say this? Oops *blush*)

 

 

the-blogger-recognition-award

 

 

Blogger Recognition Award Rules

  • Thank the blogger/s who nominated you and provide a link to their blog
  • Write a post about the Blogger Recognition Award
  • Briefly tell how your blog started
  • Give two pieces of advice to new bloggers
  • Select 15 bloggers to give this award to

 

How I started

When I finally got my guts together and decided to become a writer with the goal to be published I was told I needed to go public. “Be on Social Media, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter – and in particular start blogging!” It took a while until I had found what to blog about: My craft. How do I learn to be a writer? What does it need for me to be a better writer – and how am I progressing? That’s why I started a blog for writers where I can share not only my own experiences, but introduce other writers and in particular share what I learn from them… great writers, more experienced ones than I am.

 

Two Pieces of Advice

  1. Write as often and as  easily as you can. You are a writer when writing is what makes you happier than anything else.
  2. Learn “how to” do things in the writing process. Every step forward, every piece of advice that is given to you, try to include and use it. But don’t just follow others like sheep. Learn which process works for you and which one doesn’t.

 

My Nominees


 

Author Spotlight – Mick Canning

portraitWelcome! 

Please introduce yourself. 

Hi Aurora. I’m Mick Canning, an English writer living in England, who writes and blogs especially about India.

 

  1. When did you start writing? 

During my childhood I used to write short stories and poems that I would read aloud to my parents, and then submit to my junior school magazine. They were kind enough to publish a few of these, possibly to keep me quiet. And then I never stopped.

 

  1. What motivates you to write? 

As the cliché goes, I write because I have to! There are so many stories and ideas milling around in my head that I want to share with other people. And now that I finally have a novel published, and can therefore claim to be an author, this urge seems to have increased rather than diminished.

 

  1. What genre do you write in and what made you chose this particular genre? 

I tend to write what is usually called ‘literature’, which sounds awfully grand and pompous, but really means no more than that it does not fit into any of the usual categories of fantasy or crime or what-have-you. It is probably due more than a little to my reading habits, which are frequently also ‘literature’. Not that I don’t read plenty of other genres, of course. Some crime, some fantasy, horror, humour, and plenty of non-fiction; mainly travel and history. I will write short stories in these other genres occasionally, too, but I feel my best work is usually ‘literature’. This probably sounds dreadfully pretentious!

 

  1. What is your goal in writing? Do you have dreams where your writing should take you? 

My goal? Always to finish the current work in progress, and to make as good a job of it as I am able. I have no particular wish to publish dozens of books, but I’d like the few that I do publish to be good! My dreams, well, if my writing can take me to India or Nepal, that would be good! I suspect that is not quite what the question means, though.

 

  1. Do you ever suffer from writer’s block and if yes, how do you deal with it? 

Oh, yes. I‘m sure every writer does. My method is to go for a walk, preferably on my own, in the countryside. Whatever the problem I have with my writing, be it not knowing where the plot is going, or how my characters will act in a situation, or even something about the geography or history of the setting, a walk will infallibly enable me to sort it out.

 

  1. What advice would you like to give new, hopeful authors? 

Write! Write! Write! And read! Read! Read! The more you read, and the more widely, the more you learn how writing works. And the more you write, the better you get at it. It really helps to get feedback from someone you trust, too.

 

  1. Please, tell us about your work.  

So far, I have one self-published novel, ‘Making Friends with the Crocodile’. The title comes from an Indian proverb, and the story deals with the attitudes to and treatment of women in society, in this case specifically Rural India. It is told through the relationship between a mother and her daughter-in-law, and how a violent incident impacts upon them and the rest of the family. I wrote it in the first person, through the eyes of the older woman. And if that is not a real cheek coming from a western male writer, I don’t know what is! The book has been well received, though, even by Indian female reviewers, so perhaps I’ve succeeded in what I set out to do.

Otherwise, I have a large number of finished short stories, quite a few of them set in India, and am working on a couple of novels – one set in an Indian hill station, the other a rather over-ambitious one set in a time-scale of some four hundred years up until late Victorian times, and in England, India and Persia. I must be mad.

 

Thank you for being my guest. It was such a pleasure to have you here!! 

It’s been my pleasure to be here, Aurora. Thank you very much for having me!

 

__________________________________________________________________

 Contact Mick:

 

My blog is www.mickcanning.co

 


making-friends-with-the__-crocodileMick Canning Book:

 

My author’s link:  http://author.to/mickclink

 

The book is available as Kindle and Print-On-Demand Paperback on Amazon (the link takes you to the author page there), and also on Kobo as well as, in India, Pothi and Flipkart

The things one finds on social media…

I couldn’t resist and re-blog these hilarious pictures and share the smiles. Have fun.

Two on a Rant

Image may contain: textYep. That could be said for all of us. Our thoughts are like alligators roiling their prey underwater, while our faces appear to be a calm, serene, lake.

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How to announce that one of your co-workers has a squirrel phobia and anxiety issues.

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Meme for people who hate molasses and want it banned from the face of the earth.  Those of us who love molasses will turn a blind eye.  

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Image may contain: 1 person, meme and text

Hmmm…someone feels a bit lizardy today.

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And, for my final foray into futile thinking…

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How do I communicate with people coming to my Facebook event?

Liz Dexter from libroediting.com provided us with an extraordinary article on how to communicate with people coming to my facebook event. What a gem. Thank you, Liz!

liz_fb-event

LibroEditing proofreading, editing, transcription, localisation

This article follows on from How Do I Create A Facebook Event? and you should read that one first if you’re starting out on the process. Today we’re talking about how to communicate to the guests who are attending your Facebook event.

How can I get in touch with people attending my Facebook event?

There are two ways to do this: add a post to the event, or message attendees.

Adding a post to the event

Once you’ve created an event, when you go into the event page, you will find that it looks quite like a normal Facebook newsfeed. On the left-hand side, you will find an option to Write Post / Add Photo/Video or Create Poll (you can create a poll to find out people’s music or food preferences, for example).

Type your message into the text box and hit Post and your message will be visible on…

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A ‘HOW TO 101:’ Resource for you…

The Story Reading Ape has done us writers a HUGE favor. He has listed all 250 “How to…” blog post that appeared on his blog so far in one place which makes it easier to us to find them.
Thank you so much for this!!

how_to

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

There have been about 250 ‘HOW TO’ type posts appear on this blog to date, so I ‘ve compiled links to them in a

HOWTO 101:‘ page

See the tab above.

Then I realised that smartphone users can’t see the tab, or even the search facility top left of every post/page, so decided to draw attention to this resource, in a post.

So, without further ado, I introduce you to:

To see the list of topics included

Click HERE

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9 Hot Trends In Publishing In 2017

Nicholas Rossis provides us with an interesting blog post about 9 trends in publishing this year. Thank you, Nicholas.

Nicholas C. Rossis

2017 publishing trends | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Image: Publishing Executive (pubexec.com)

Written World Media, one of my favorite sources of information on publishing, published earlier this month a post on the trends that will define our industry in 2017 (if you don’t subscribe to its newsletter, you should; it’s free, comes out only once or twice a month, and is filled with tips, tricks, and industry news).

So, what can we expect from 2017? Here are the Written World Media’s predictions:

1. The Majority of Fiction Sales will Come from eBooks

70% of adult fiction sales were digital last year. It is likely that ebook readership will continue to grow in 2017. More eBook readers means more eBook sales. This means that, if you’re writing fiction, promoting your eBooks is a good place to focus in the coming year.

2. Indie Authors and Small Presses will Dominate

In the October 2016 author earnings report we…

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February/March 2017 Writing Contests

Thank you once again, Rachel Poli, for providing us with the next two months’ Writing Contests.

Rachel Poli

february-march-2017-writing-contestsFebruary 2017

Genre: Fiction, Nonfiction, or Poetry
Theme: Sentence starter – use the first line given
Website: The First Line
Deadline: February 1, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $25-$50 for fiction, $5-$10 for poetry, and $25 for nonfiction

Genre: Poetry
Theme: Love
Website: Don’t Talk To Me About Love
Deadline: February 14, 2017
Entry Fee: $20 for 1-3 poems
Prize: First place – $1,000

Genre: Fiction
Theme: N/A
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: February 28, 2017
Entry Fee: $18
Prize: First place – $2,500

Genre: Flash Fiction
Theme: N/A
Website: WOW! Women On Writing
Deadline: February 28, 2017
Entry Fee: $10
Prize: First place – $350

March 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: Food
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: March 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $10 for up 6 poems or $15 for up to 12 poems
Prize: First place – $500

Genre: Fiction and Nonfiction
Theme: None
Website: Narrative Magazine
Deadline: March 31, 2017

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