You READ – but do you leave REVIEWS? – Written By Chris Graham (aka The Story Reading Ape)

Thank you so much for this great, interesting and helpful blog post, Chris. It encourages readers to write reviews and help and support us authors.


PLEASE

A stack of books and words Read - Review - Repeat

If not, why not?

I don’t have time

The author probably spent a heck of a lot more time writing the story than you took to read it, no matter how slow you think you are, so why not take a few minutes to record your feelings about it.

I can’t write long fancy reviews like those I see on book review blogs

You don’t have to, Amazon, for example, only ask you to use a minimum of 25 non repeating words.

I can’t express myself very well

No-one is asking you to produce a literary masterpiece, start off with things you liked, didn’t like or a mix of both about the book, e.g.,

CONTINUE READING HERE

How to create an EPUB or MOBI file in seconds. Ebook publishing for beginner writers – Written By Louise Harnby

For those of us who do have difficulties with the conversion of our stories into EPUB or MOBI files. Thank you very much for your informative post, Louise!


Here’s how to convert a Word document into EPUB or MOBI file format. This option certainly won’t be for everyone, but if it suits you, you can master it in seconds … and for free.

Many authors create their books directly in Microsoft Word because of its excellent suite of onboard styling tools and its compatibility with a range of plug-ins and add-ins (including macros). Pro editors love it for the same reasons.

​Once the writing, drafting, editing, and final revisions are complete, it’s time to publish. Is a Word file good enough for epublication? How about a DIY conversion to EPUB or MOBI? It depends on several factors:

  • Your freebie plans
  • Your budget
  • Your sales and distribution platform
  • The complexity of your interior design

Continue reading HERE

Unforced Errors—5 Ways Writers Stand Between Themselves And Success – Written By Ruth Harris…

Ruth Harris published a guest post on Anne R. Allen’s blog about how writers stand between themselves and success. Thank you for your very educational blog post, Ruth.


on Anne R. Allen:

A term used in scoring tennis, “unforced errors” are not caused by the actions of the player’s opponent, but they’re the responsibility of the player him/herself. S/he is caught wrong-footed, out of balance, unable to return the serve, incapable of making the winning shot.

The concept of unforced errors can also be usefully applied to writers. Unforced errors are the self-inflicted harm we do to ourselves.

Continue reading HERE

A New Audio Book Release – kongo.com – Written By Don Massenzio

Don Massenzio has released his new audio book kongo.com. Congratulations, Don! This is amazing!


I’m happy to announce that my book, kongo.com, is available in audiobook format. The book is a collection of four related long-format short stories/novellas. The Audio Book is available HERE.

kongo.com cover designed by Don Massenzio

About kongo.com

In my book, kongo.com, I have pulled together four separate related stories. Three of them were published as serials on my blog over the past year. The fourth is a brand new story that weaves together the other three. This was an enjoyable exercise and I hope that those that choose to read it will enjoy it as well.

Here is a bit about each of the stories in kongo.com

CONTINUE READING HERE

Everything you need to know about Social Media Tagging in 2020 – Written By Janice Wald

Social Media tagging gets more and more important, and we writers better get used to using it to our advantage. Thank you for your help, Janice Wald!


Did you realize tagging on social media was complex?

Why is social media tagging helpful for us?

Tagging on social media is a powerful practice.

Social media tagging has many benefits for you.

When you tag, you get the attention of influencers who

  • Might link to you and improve your SEO
  • Might let you guest post and increase your subscribers
  • Might reshare your posts and extend your reach
  • Make you look good and boost your credibility

According to the UK Domain blog, in 2019, tagging on social media resulted in a 56% boost in engagement. Those figures should be even higher now.

This post will explain how tags work on 5 social media sites: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Quora, and LinkedIn.

Continue reading HERE

 

Nicholas Rossis – And His Blog Post Collection

This week Nicholas Rossis was busy blogging… I couldn’t decide which tones to re-blog – and decided to just publish his entire collection. He has fascinating and informative posts and this way you can decide for yourself which ones are interesting to you. Thanks a lot, Nicholas!


Translating Puns

Pure Bread Cat pun | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

As anyone who’s been following my blog for a while surely knows, I love puns and bad dad jokes (often the same thing). And I often use them in my work, especially in my children’s books. Which becomes rather problematic when translating them into Greek. How can someone translate puns decently?

Rick van Mechelen, aka “that translation student“, recently shared an interesting post on this very subject. He cites Dirk Delabastita 1996 work* to divide puns into four categories of ambiguity. These are homonymy, homophony, homography, and paronymy, each of which is better suited to different forms of communication:

Category Definition Example
Homonymy A pun where a word with multiple meanings is used to give multiple meanings at once. A hard-boiled egg in the morning is hard to beat.
Homophony A pun using two words that sound identical, but have different spellings. ‘Mine is a long and…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Getting Married in the Middle Ages

Whether you’re writing Medieval history fiction or fantasy, you will appreciate this Quora answer by Helena Schrader, who borrowed from an article she wrote for The Medieval Magazine. To this, I have added information by Brent Cooper, taken from medievaltimes.com.

Getting Married in the Middle Ages

First, a caveat: the Middle Ages lasted a thousand years in places as different as Iceland and the Holy Land. So, things differed from place to place and from time to time. After all, did your grandmother get married in a similar way to you?

No matter where and when, though, a general fact about marriage in the Middle Ages is that it was usually an economic affair.

This is not to say that the parties to a medieval marriage inherently lacked affection, passion, or sexual attraction. However, economic considerations played an important role in marriage negotiations and contracts…

CONTINUE READING HERE


7 Tips to Write a Killer Book Presentation

Daniela McVicker | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksThis is a guest post by Daniela McVicker. Daniela is a contributor to Essayguard. She has a master’s degree in English Literature and is truly passionate about learning foreign languages and teaching. Daniela works with the students to help them reveal their writing talent and find their one true calling.

7 Tips to Write a Killer Book Presentation

Sometimes, a book you have written draws enough attention that you are asked to speak about it to an audience. You may be asked to present as a subject expert, talk about your material at a conference or convention, present at a book fair, or give a quick presentation as part of a book signing.

As they say, more people are afraid of public speaking than of death. Which means that most people would prefer being in a casket than giving the obituary.

And now, you’re going to be in…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Sci-Fi Tip: Futuristic Construction Technologies

Skyscraper | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

My Ph.D. thesis, Design in the Digital Age: In Search of a Collaborative Paradigm, was all about finding novel ways to help designers interact with their clients. I had envisioned a tablet-based Virtual Reality environment with Augmented Reality elements for the client, thus allowing them to better understand what the architect or designer was trying to achieve. As for the architect or designer, Artificial-Intelligence software would significantly speed up the design process.

My thesis was published in 2000. Unfortunately, my vision has yet to be brought together by a software company, even though most of the elements I was describing are now widely available.

However, that doesn’t mean that technology hasn’t changed in other ways. As an article in IndiaCADworks explains, in the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industries, new technologies are advancing with each passing day that makes the process of construction smarter, more streamlined, and indeed futuristic.

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

The First Thing You Do Is Draw A Map – Guest Post On TSRA’s Blog – Written By Jaq D Hawkins

I found this fantastic blog post about building worlds and drawing maps on The Story Reading Ape’s blog. It’s a guest post, written by Jaq D Hawkins. What a very informative post. Thank you, Jaq.


I’ve been a Fantasy reader pretty much all of my life, but I’ve never been enamoured of maps. It isn’t that I have trouble reading them; I’ve travelled many real places relying on the navigation of accurate maps and find them very useful. However, a map of an imaginary place in the beginning of a new book is fairly meaningless to me until I’m well immersed in the story and the occasional glimpse back at the map at the front can provide perspective on where places relate to one another.

Even then, I’ve often held the opinion that lazy writing is what makes the image necessary, even though maps characterise the epic tales from such luminaries as J.R.R. Tolkien and George R.R. Martin.

CONTINUE READING HERE

The Legends Of Windemere – Charles Yallowitz – Physical Description Posts

Charles Yallowitz published two blog posts about the difficulties of physical descriptions on his ‘The Legends of Windemere’ blog. I decided both are worth sharing. And here they are. Thank you very much, Charles!


The Physical Description: A Necessary & Surprisingly Difficult Piece

I think we can take this for granted.  Physical descriptions come off a little like a ‘duh’ concept.  We need to know what our characters look like to some extent.  Otherwise, every reader gets their own visual with no similarities.  Not necessarily a bad thing until people begin fighting over it.  You also lose a dimension if you avoid it entirely.  Yes, we have a personality, actions, and words, but there can be a sense of lacking if we don’t have even a basic appearance.  This goes for places too, but we’re going to focus on characters for this week.  So, why is this?

Readers have these things called the five senses . . . Oh, that’s going too far back into the details.  We all know this.  We also know that an author should try very hard to hit as many of them as possible.  This is much easier…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Questions 3: How Do You Describe the Physical?

It’s been a week with a topic that was more difficult than I expected.  You would think doing a physical description is basic and easy.  It’s part of a foundation for a character and a story when your goal is to create an image in the reader’s head.  Everyone has their own opinion and strategy.  So, let’s not beat around the bush and end the week by opening the floor:

  1. How important is physical description to you as an author?
  2. What tip would you have for a new author struggling with this?
  3. What is the funniest thing you’ve done with a physical description?  (This can be accidental or on purpose. For me, it would be the switching eye color on Luke Callindor.)

CONTINUE READING HERE