Monday Funnies…

Thank you so much for the giggle, Chris. I just love Maxine!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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How To Survive Admitting You Cannot Commit To A Genre Because You Want To Explore Other Things #MondayBlogs #Writer

Lucy Mitchell of Blonde Write More provides us with an interesting post about not committing to a genre. Thank you Lucy.

 

BlondeWriteMore

I feel like I owe the genre of romantic comedy an explanation as I am not currently writing stories from it and I have no intention of returning just yet.

Admitting you cannot commit to a genre because you have urges to write stories from other genres can be tough, especially when those around you believe you should be staying true to your genre roots.

I didn’t make a conscious decision to write stories from other genres. I wasn’t looking for stories from other genres. Some characters turned up inside my head one day and persuaded me to follow them.

We’re not married to our genres so why do we sometimes feel obliged to only write stories from them?

I know quite a few good writers and authors who have stuck to their genre and remained devoted. I admire them for this.

However, I want to go explore other things…

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…Authors, as much as possible, check the facts…

Excellent advice, Seumas Gallacher. Thank you for sharing your experience with us!

Seumas Gallacher

…it will come as no surprise to some of yeez to learn that as a wee boy at school in Docklands, Govan in Glasgow, Master Gallacher was a bit of a ‘smart-ass’…a trait that has doubtless recognisably carried forward into my more advanced years…  always first to raise my hand to try to answer the teacher’s questions… always striving to be first finished with the classroom-bound written exams so I could, “…go ootside and play, noo, please Miss?”… comes now ‘The Writer Age’ the Scribbler-at-Large...  pensmith of novels… blithely transferring the contents of what’s left of my wee grey cells onto the laptop, hopefully for international reader consumption, and possible approbation… thus far, yer Lordships and Ladyships of the e-Reading Universe have wrought unbounded kindness and generosity on my WURKS, by downloading my baby masterpieces on a regular  basis… Kindlers Listers, all, yeez…

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Top Three Excuses For Not Writing That Book

The top three excuses for not writing that book – and what Don Massenzio has to say about that!

DSM Publications

You’ve always wanted to write a book. You know you have at least one book bouncing around in your brain. So what’s stopping you?

I’ve been there. I’ve had the desire to write a book my entire life. I had many fits and starts, but always found an excuse not to do it. Finally, at the tender young age of 50, I published my first novel. I’m now 53 and I’ve published five novels, a collection of short stories and a non-fiction book on independent publishing.

I’m not bragging about this. I kick myself every day for not starting 20 or 30 years sooner. The only thing that allowed me to finish my first book is that I stopped making excuses.

This post is a look at the top excuses that keep many of us from unleashing that inner author on the world. Take a look at them and feel…

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When to Show and When to Tell

Ryan Lanz of ‘A Writer’s Path’ tells us when to show and when to tell. Thank you for a great post Ryan.

A Writer's Path

by Kyle Massa

Show, don’t tell.

If you’ve ever taken a writing course of any kind, you’ve probably heard that phrase.

If you haven’t, the meaning is pretty simple: don’t come out and tell your readers everything they need to know. Instead, show them examples and specific situations that support what you’re trying to say. Doing so often solidifies your points a little better than straight telling.

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…and in other news… bestselling Author, Master Gallacher, turns commercial (shock! horror!)…

Master Gallacher offers his knowledge and experience to all of us authors! This is great news!!

Seumas Gallacher

…far be it from this ol’ Scots Jurassic scribbler to blow his own bagpipe, but in seems a groundswell has taken place whereby enuff other writing folks deem my supposed prowess in the craft sufficient for them to entrust their own wee literary baby masterpieces to my eye for, either/or/or both, proofreading and copy editing… I posted the undernoted to my Facebook page a few days ago, and am gratified to have received enquiries from other quillspersons already… (if yeez don’t let them know where yeez are, how else are they gonna find yeez, Mabel?)… as they say in all the classic notices like this… ‘quotes available by return’

To my Author/Wannabe Author Friends:

Over the past couple of years, I’ve been honoured by approaches from fellow writers and bloggers (established and beginners) to bring my professional writing skills to bear on THEIR work. It has developed into…

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Just In Case You’re A Blogger Running Out Of Ideas

Jenn Hanson-dePaula presents us 100 new blogging ideas on ‘Mixtus Media’. Thank you Jenn! We really appreciate your efforts!


One of our most popular blog posts from the past few years was called 50 Blog Topics for Fiction Writers. I had a conversation with a fiction writer who said, “I write fiction – why would I need a blog? What on earth would I write about?”

That conversation inspired the blog post. And from the response that we got, it was a question that many fiction writers were asking as well.

For years I’ve heard from publishers, agents, and authors that they didn’t think blogs were necessary for fiction writers. I 100% disagree.

Blogs provide three important benefits for authors:

1) Value. A blog, podcast, video blog – whatever medium you want to use – is still the best way to show readers (and potential new readers) the author’s writing style, and it provides a long-form medium (relative to social media posts) to develop deeper interest and intrigue into their new book.

2) Traffic. A blog is the best way to drive traffic from social media back to the author’s website, which makes them, their book, and online presence more visible by helping with search engine rankings and social algorithms.

3) Connection. We don’t want readers to stay on social media – we want to drive them to the author’s website. A blog is the best way to deepen the connection between an author and their readers.

The purpose of a blog isn’t for a writer to talk about themselves. The purpose of a blog is to provide content that speaks to their ideal reader.

If you’re a fiction writer and you haven’t seen success with your blog, I would like to pose a question:

Are you using your blog as a means of promotion or to connect with your ideal readers?
If you want your blog, social media, book marketing, and so on to work, you have to come at it from the perspective of your ideal reader.

To read the 100 new topics for fiction writers to get you going, go to:

100 NEW Blog Topics for Fiction Writers