The Truth – And How I Use My Characters To Say It

Picture courtesy of http://www.thepowerofoneness.com/blog/tag/live-your-truth/

Don’t we all wish sometimes we could just tell the truth instead of juggling tactfully around saying what the other one would like to hear? Let me give you a few examples.

Imagine, a hair salon, somewhere in a big city… the walls are covered with breathtaking hairstyles on equally breathtaking people, the hairstylist expects his next appointment.

A customer enters and points to one of the pictures on the wall, telling the hairdresser: “I want exactly that hairstyle here.”

Now, what does the hairstylist want to say? “Well, I’m afraid, that is a misunderstanding. See, this is a professional model, a really beautiful human being. Whereas you are a caprice of nature… barely to look at.”

What does the stylist say eventually? “Aaawww. What an excellent choice. That cut will frame your face wonderfully. I’m convinced it will look splendidly on you.”

Or, let’s have a look at another example:

Parents are invited to a parent’s conference day, and they’re meeting their kids’ teacher.

Imagine what the teacher would like to say: “Ah, yes. Your son Willy. A complete idiot. About as intelligent as six feet of dirt track… I’m surprised how this child finds the door in the morning to leave the house. My advice to you: set him free; start from scratch.”

What does he say? “Your son. He is intelligent but does have a few difficulties to focus and concentrate. There are practices and exercises to improve that. But I’m convinced the older he gets, the easier it will be for him…”

Or, how do you tell parents that their child is not the cutest on earth? Ask them for a picture. Then you study it for a few minutes and say: “Aha… hmm… you know…. are you sure that this is indeed the face?”

Of course, our society does not accept the naked truth. We all know words can hurt, and we don’t want to hurt people, nor do we want to be hurt. That’s when our ability to successfully veil our replies in conversations, create our answers in a way to compliment the other person, and hide what we really think.

At this point, I admit, it is a relief at times, to use my characters to speak what ‘they’ think, and of course, use them to write what I think. I rarely refer to a particular person or situation. But I permit my characters at times, to be as outspoken, open, bold, and sometimes rude, as I would never dare to be in public.

At times I wonder, if crime authors use their books to ‘kill people’ they don’t like in real life.

What would you permit your character to do what you cannot do or say in your real life? Let me know in the comments, I’m curious.

 

Everything you need to know about Social Media Tagging in 2020 – Written By Janice Wald

Social Media tagging gets more and more important, and we writers better get used to using it to our advantage. Thank you for your help, Janice Wald!


Did you realize tagging on social media was complex?

Why is social media tagging helpful for us?

Tagging on social media is a powerful practice.

Social media tagging has many benefits for you.

When you tag, you get the attention of influencers who

  • Might link to you and improve your SEO
  • Might let you guest post and increase your subscribers
  • Might reshare your posts and extend your reach
  • Make you look good and boost your credibility

According to the UK Domain blog, in 2019, tagging on social media resulted in a 56% boost in engagement. Those figures should be even higher now.

This post will explain how tags work on 5 social media sites: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Quora, and LinkedIn.

Continue reading HERE

 

Nicholas Rossis – And His Blog Post Collection

This week Nicholas Rossis was busy blogging… I couldn’t decide which tones to re-blog – and decided to just publish his entire collection. He has fascinating and informative posts and this way you can decide for yourself which ones are interesting to you. Thanks a lot, Nicholas!


Translating Puns

Pure Bread Cat pun | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

As anyone who’s been following my blog for a while surely knows, I love puns and bad dad jokes (often the same thing). And I often use them in my work, especially in my children’s books. Which becomes rather problematic when translating them into Greek. How can someone translate puns decently?

Rick van Mechelen, aka “that translation student“, recently shared an interesting post on this very subject. He cites Dirk Delabastita 1996 work* to divide puns into four categories of ambiguity. These are homonymy, homophony, homography, and paronymy, each of which is better suited to different forms of communication:

Category Definition Example
Homonymy A pun where a word with multiple meanings is used to give multiple meanings at once. A hard-boiled egg in the morning is hard to beat.
Homophony A pun using two words that sound identical, but have different spellings. ‘Mine is a long and…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Getting Married in the Middle Ages

Whether you’re writing Medieval history fiction or fantasy, you will appreciate this Quora answer by Helena Schrader, who borrowed from an article she wrote for The Medieval Magazine. To this, I have added information by Brent Cooper, taken from medievaltimes.com.

Getting Married in the Middle Ages

First, a caveat: the Middle Ages lasted a thousand years in places as different as Iceland and the Holy Land. So, things differed from place to place and from time to time. After all, did your grandmother get married in a similar way to you?

No matter where and when, though, a general fact about marriage in the Middle Ages is that it was usually an economic affair.

This is not to say that the parties to a medieval marriage inherently lacked affection, passion, or sexual attraction. However, economic considerations played an important role in marriage negotiations and contracts…

CONTINUE READING HERE


7 Tips to Write a Killer Book Presentation

Daniela McVicker | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksThis is a guest post by Daniela McVicker. Daniela is a contributor to Essayguard. She has a master’s degree in English Literature and is truly passionate about learning foreign languages and teaching. Daniela works with the students to help them reveal their writing talent and find their one true calling.

7 Tips to Write a Killer Book Presentation

Sometimes, a book you have written draws enough attention that you are asked to speak about it to an audience. You may be asked to present as a subject expert, talk about your material at a conference or convention, present at a book fair, or give a quick presentation as part of a book signing.

As they say, more people are afraid of public speaking than of death. Which means that most people would prefer being in a casket than giving the obituary.

And now, you’re going to be in…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Sci-Fi Tip: Futuristic Construction Technologies

Skyscraper | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

My Ph.D. thesis, Design in the Digital Age: In Search of a Collaborative Paradigm, was all about finding novel ways to help designers interact with their clients. I had envisioned a tablet-based Virtual Reality environment with Augmented Reality elements for the client, thus allowing them to better understand what the architect or designer was trying to achieve. As for the architect or designer, Artificial-Intelligence software would significantly speed up the design process.

My thesis was published in 2000. Unfortunately, my vision has yet to be brought together by a software company, even though most of the elements I was describing are now widely available.

However, that doesn’t mean that technology hasn’t changed in other ways. As an article in IndiaCADworks explains, in the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industries, new technologies are advancing with each passing day that makes the process of construction smarter, more streamlined, and indeed futuristic.

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

The First Thing You Do Is Draw A Map – Guest Post On TSRA’s Blog – Written By Jaq D Hawkins

I found this fantastic blog post about building worlds and drawing maps on The Story Reading Ape’s blog. It’s a guest post, written by Jaq D Hawkins. What a very informative post. Thank you, Jaq.


I’ve been a Fantasy reader pretty much all of my life, but I’ve never been enamoured of maps. It isn’t that I have trouble reading them; I’ve travelled many real places relying on the navigation of accurate maps and find them very useful. However, a map of an imaginary place in the beginning of a new book is fairly meaningless to me until I’m well immersed in the story and the occasional glimpse back at the map at the front can provide perspective on where places relate to one another.

Even then, I’ve often held the opinion that lazy writing is what makes the image necessary, even though maps characterise the epic tales from such luminaries as J.R.R. Tolkien and George R.R. Martin.

CONTINUE READING HERE

The Legends Of Windemere – Charles Yallowitz – Physical Description Posts

Charles Yallowitz published two blog posts about the difficulties of physical descriptions on his ‘The Legends of Windemere’ blog. I decided both are worth sharing. And here they are. Thank you very much, Charles!


The Physical Description: A Necessary & Surprisingly Difficult Piece

I think we can take this for granted.  Physical descriptions come off a little like a ‘duh’ concept.  We need to know what our characters look like to some extent.  Otherwise, every reader gets their own visual with no similarities.  Not necessarily a bad thing until people begin fighting over it.  You also lose a dimension if you avoid it entirely.  Yes, we have a personality, actions, and words, but there can be a sense of lacking if we don’t have even a basic appearance.  This goes for places too, but we’re going to focus on characters for this week.  So, why is this?

Readers have these things called the five senses . . . Oh, that’s going too far back into the details.  We all know this.  We also know that an author should try very hard to hit as many of them as possible.  This is much easier…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Questions 3: How Do You Describe the Physical?

It’s been a week with a topic that was more difficult than I expected.  You would think doing a physical description is basic and easy.  It’s part of a foundation for a character and a story when your goal is to create an image in the reader’s head.  Everyone has their own opinion and strategy.  So, let’s not beat around the bush and end the week by opening the floor:

  1. How important is physical description to you as an author?
  2. What tip would you have for a new author struggling with this?
  3. What is the funniest thing you’ve done with a physical description?  (This can be accidental or on purpose. For me, it would be the switching eye color on Luke Callindor.)

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

5 Essential Book Promotion Tools For Every Author – Written By Derek Haines…

Derek Haines informs us about five essential book promotion tools for authors. Thank you so much for your helpful blog post, Derek!


on Just Publishing Advice:

For self-published authors, book promotion is always a challenge.

It takes time to plan your book marketing ideas before your book launch. Then you need to keep the buzz going after you publish a book.

There are many ways to market a book, yet for an indie author, the most critical factor is your time.

You want to get your book noticed by potential readers, but you don’t want to spend all your waking hours trying to sell your book.

In This Article

Time-saving book promotion tools

1. Publisher Rocket
2. Canva
3. SNAP Auto Poster
4. MailChimp
5. Kindlepreneur Book Description Generator

Continue reading HERE

 

5 tips for writing about physical pain in fiction – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby published a blog post that provides us with tips for writing about physical pain in fiction. I find this a very helpful post and decided to share it. Thank you, Louise!


 

Writing about pain is hard, but there’s no shame in that struggle; it’s difficult to articulate even when we’re experiencing it.

This post featured in Joel Friedlander’s
​Self-Publishing: The Carnival of the Indies #85

​​‘Pain is […] the kind of subjective and poorly delineated experience that is difficult to express satisfactorily in language […] Indeed, pain shares some of the characteristics of target domains that have received considerable attention in the cognitive linguistic literature. Like LOVE, for example, it is private, subjective […] cannot be directly observed,’ says linguist Elena Semino.

When researching this article, I was surprised by how little has been written about the art of depicting physical pain in fiction. And, yet, the act of hurting is prevalent in most genres; it deserves as much attention as emotional distress.

Continue reading HERE

You Got Your First Bad Review: Congratulations! – Written By Anne R. Allen

Anne R. Allen wrote the perfect blog post about the first bad review, and I would recommend every young/new author to read it. She writes with compassion and humor. Thanks for this one, Anne! You rock!


I’m not sure anything stings as much as that first bad review. You’re riding high in triumph. You finished the project that may have taken decades to complete. Then you survived the crushing editing/ querying/ rejections/ revising/ editing again process. But now you’re finally a published author.

Yay!

Whether the publisher is yourself or the Random Penguin House, the feeling is the same. It’s your baby and you just gave birth. You are experiencing a moment of bliss.

And then…splat.

That review. Somebody hates your baby. They really hate it. You are a talentless hack and a worthless defiler of language. They say you should never write another word and suggest you take up underwater basket-weaving or making throw pillows out of dryer lint.

And it hurts like #$&@.

Continue reading HERE

5 reasons to turn your book into an audiobook – Written By Derek Doepker

Thanks a lot for this great and educational blog post, Derek Doepker! This is definitely something to think about.


on Build Book Buzz:

Audiobook sales are booming.

In fact, Written Word Media said that audiobooks are the number one publishing trend of 2020. With this increase in audiobook popularity, savvy indie authors can reach a whole new audience of readers by creating audiobooks.

Just about every indie author can benefit from having audiobooks. There are a few exceptions, of course, including cookbooks and technical manuals. However, most genres make great audiobooks. This includes fiction, nonfiction, and children’s narrative books.

If you’re in one of these categories, read on to discover five reasons why you’ll want to tap into the audiobook market.

Continue reading HERE