How to Create Evergreen Blog Content

Suzie Speaks tells us how to create evergreen blog content. Thank you so much for sharing your experience!

Suzie Speaks

How to create evergreen blog content

There are two types of content that I usually post on my blog:

Daily Experiences – things I see and do, journal-type notes, general thoughts etc. These posts are generally just for fun – I write them for enjoyment and they keep within the original purpose that the blog was intended for: therapy. I don’t pay much attention to SEO, keywords or images as I know that these sorts of posts will be seen over a period of about a month and then will be considered to be out of date. Essentially, non-evergreen content that has an expiration date.

Evergreen Content – posts that will be generally relevant over long periods of time and aren’t necessarily specific to my own life. Within these I am much more focused on keywords and SEO techniques, I spend a much longer period of time crafting beautiful and pinnable images and I make sure…

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Do Your Own Research – A Warning to Indie Authors – Guest Post by, Yecheilyah Ysrayl…

Yecheilyah Ysrael pupblished a guest post on TSRA’s blog today, giving excellent advice to Indie Authors. Thank you Yecheilyah!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Hey Guys! Wow. It’s been a long time. I miss you all!

*waves to readers and sits on virtual sofa*

This article started out extremely long but then I realized how necessary it was to keep this short and simple.There is so much information out here for Independent Authors and so many made-up commandments it isn’t funny. Everyone has an opinion on what the new author should and shouldn’t do. Everyone has a piece of advice to give or stones to throw. If you move this way you are doing it wrong and if you move that way you are still doing it wrong. There are more laws for the Self-Publisher than there are in the bible. There is something to say about everything. This is why I humbly advise each person to experience everything for themselves and to do their own research. Sometimes you don’t need to…

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5 Reasons Why You Should Podcast Your Fiction…

On The Story Reading Ape’s blog I found a link to Joanna Penn’s blog post about five reasons why we should podcast our stories. Thank you Chris and Joanna!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Joanna Penn  on How to Ebook site:

Storytelling has gone hand in hand with the audio format since our ancestors told each other stories around the campfire.

I can remember lying in bed listening to Peter and the Wolf on tape, and before I wrote fiction, I listened to audio fiction podcasts like Scott Sigler’s Infected and 7th Son by JC Hutchins, early pioneers of podcast fiction. 

Nowadays, we have super-professional podcasts like Welcome to Nightvale, as well as audio-dramas and radio plays. In today’s article, Matthew McLean from ThePodcastHost, talks about why you should consider podcasting your fiction.

Why do you write fiction? What’s your ultimate goal?

Is it to get published, and see your book proudly displayed on bookstore shelves?

Or is it purely as an outlet for your creativity, and for the love of reaching people with your stories?

Whatever your reason, the decision to…

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Smoke and Mirrors: How to Avoid Hating Your Blog in 2018

Suziespeaks has published an enormously important and useful post on how to avoid hating your blog in 2018. Thank you so much for all your advice!

Suzie Speaks

Blogging tips

A new year always begins with the same pattern in the blogging world. My emails, reader and social media feeds become filled with targets for the next twelve months and an influx of New Year’s Resolution bloggers will start to appear in the comment section on my blog or across various Facebook groups.

The next few weeks will be filled with an overwhelming amount of conflicting information and I can pretty much guarantee that most will disappear as quickly as they arrived. For some, the novelty of having a blog wears off pretty quickly. For others, there’s a disappointing realisation that thousands of views can’t be achieved simply by pressing the publish button.

However, for the ones that stick it out, it can become a minefield of self-doubt and, at times, a huge knock to their confidence in their writing abilities.

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How to Tailor Your Resume — Tips for Writers

Nicholas Rossis with an interesting and helpful post about writer’s resumes. Thank you, Nicholas!

 

Nicholas C. Rossis

Victoria Sawtelle | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book

This is the second part of a 3-part series dealing with alternative ways of making a living through writing. Victoria Sawtelle is a community manager at Uptowork – a career blog with +1.5 million monthly readers. I agreed to share this guest post because they have created an amazingly detailed guide on how to make a writer’s resume, with over 30 examples and detailed, step-by-step instructions. Uptowork has kindly agreed to offer my readers free access to their resume builder, so if anyone’s interested, use the free trial code ZgyI50xW.

How to Tailor Your Resume — Tips for Writers

Ghostwriting | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Image: rainbowriting.com

You’re a writer.

You’ve written copy for newsletters, popular guides for blogs, and insightful articles for news outlets.

You’ve rewritten more buzzword-loving execs you care to count.

Ghostwriting? Been there, done that.

Plus, there’s that novel you’re working on.

You can write it all—

But for an…

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Changing My Books’ Titles And Some News

Congratulations, Nicholas C. Rossis! Brilliant news are brilliant news! One day I’d like to be where you are now.

Nicholas C. Rossis

Some News First

Azure Fire Publishing | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksThere have been some interesting developments in my writing career, among which the fact I’m now Editor-in-chief for Azure Fire Publishing (AFP), a US-based non-profit promoting youth-friendly Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Even though the position only offers a nominal fee at the moment, it comes with a perk: AFP has offered to publish my Fantasy/Science Fiction books.

The organization has a large monthly advertising budget to promote its authors’ books, so, after much deliberation, I have decided to accept.

My Books’ Titles

Pearseus cover | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksPerhaps, then, this is the perfect opportunity to deal with something that’s been bugging me for a while now: my first books’ titles. I find myself no longer satisfied by “Rise of the Prince” and “The Power of Six,” as I think of them as weak titles compared to my later ones. And since AFP will soon handle these…

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Your Unique Author Picture – Research By A. J. Alexander

Picture courtesy of: http://gregceoblog.com

 

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I have been thinking about Author Pictures lately. I know very well what I have on my Social Media accounts right now isn’t a great thing to do. One of the main reasons for these overexposed profile pictures is the fact that I don’t like it to be on pictures. And from what I heard this can be seen in the picture.

 

No matter how often I’m told the pictures look great, and I’m supposed to be pretty, I don’t believe it. This does, in fact, have a psychological root which was planted in my childhood, but I think this is another subject and doesn’t belong here.

 

Now, since one day I will undoubtedly be published I will sooner or later have to think about my author picture, and that’s why I went for another round of research.

 

One of the first interesting and informative articles I found on Huffington Post where Heather Hummel talks about the relevance of a professional author photo. She not only talks about the quality of the picture but also shows certain problems that can come up and presents the respective solutions. For example, does she mention the expression on the picture, the quality, the background and presents some final thoughts. (Read the entire article here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/heather-hummel/the-relevance-of-a-profes_b_4498575.html)

 

By going on with my research, I found “The Review Review.” Written by Randy Susan Meyers the article “Look Great In Your Author Photo” gives you tips and tricks on colors, clothes, and makeup and also describes what you can do to hide certain flaws and how to choose your photographer. I thought it is a great helpful post who I would recommend reading when someone needs a (new) author photo. (To read the post click here: http://www.thereviewreview.net/publishing-tips/look-great-your-author-photo)

 

On the Author Media website, I found a fantastic post, written by author Thomas Umstattd. He clearly states that his article is not for the author, but for the photographer! And I think he did an amazing job. Even though being an author I learned a lot by reading his article, and I might even be able to show it to my future photographer if necessary, to show him what I need the picture for. The article is enormously useful to us ‘clients’ too! (It can be read here: http://www.authormedia.com/how-to-take-portraits-for-an-author-website/)

 

The last impressive article I found on “Book In A Box,” written by Tucker Max, Chairman & Co-Founder at Book In A Box. He shows what’s good and what’s bad and not just said, some pics are good or bad but also explains the reason in clear, simple words. He provides us with different examples and gives us great advice on what not to do and what he would recommend getting a great picture. I decided to provide you here with a small part of his article:

 

The Author Photo Rule That Rules Them All

Here’s the thing that makes author photos so hard to give advice about: There is not one “right” way to do it. Like I talked about above, the “right” way all depends on what you’re trying to achieve. But there is one overarching rule that you need to sear into your brain when it comes to author photos (or any profile photo):

Know what you want to say to what audience, and make sure you signal it properly.

This is the key to everything. The author photo for a CEO of a Fortune 500 company should be totally different from the author photo for an up-and-coming comedian. Why? Because they are signaling different things to different groups.
Generally speaking, the CEO’s author photo should signal professionalism, effectiveness, reliability, and trust. The comedian’s photo could be wacky, pensive, goofy or even serious, all depending on his comedic style and what he wanted to signal.

To read the full article go to http://bookinabox.com/blog/how-to-take-author-photo/

 

I have to say I learned a lot by reading these four articles, and I’m sure I’ll find a great photographer who helps me. But then, maybe I’ll just hide under a stone and rather provide the world with my stories than my face.

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Author James Jones
courtesy of: http://www.jamesjonesliterarysociety.org/