How To Pitch Your Novel In Person To An Editor or Agent – Written By Bryn Donovan

I found a great post published by Bryn Donovan on her blog. To many writers her article provides valuable information on how to pitch in person. Thank you very much Bryn.


Hi friends! I’m writing this post at SleuthFest, a terrific writers’ conference for mystery and thriller writers. As an acquiring editor, I’ve spent hours here hearing novel pitches and chatting with writers. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I love talking with fiction writers about their projects, so I enjoyed it.

Writing conferences often set up agent and editor appointments so that writers can pitch their work in person. The goal is usually to have the agent or editor say, “Yes, send me the full manuscript,” Beyond that, it’s an opportunity to learn more about an editor and agent and to make a connection.

To read the entire article, click here:

How To Pitch Your Novel In Person To An Editor or Agent

 

Writing An Agent Submission Letter

Helen Jones provides us with a great post about how to write an agent submission letter. Thank you, Helen!

Helen Glynn Jones

img_3729After seven days of writing about an otherworldly weekend away with The Silent Eye, it’s back to reality with a rather prosaic thud – this post is all about crafting the agent submission letter.

I’ve written before about submitting your manuscript to agents – while I don’t consider myself by any means an expert, I have had a bit of experience in sending the things out. I also attended a workshop some time back at Bloomsbury, where a couple of London agents shared their idea of a perfect submission letter, and several other agents have commented that my submission package stood out from the others (although no-one has taken me on board as yet – boo-hoo).

So, how do you structure the all-important letter? (I say all-important because it’s the first opportunity you have to make an impression, and we all know how important first impressions are). Well, here are…

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Authors Should Think Twice Before Signing A Book Contract – Writtey By Derek Haines

Getting a publisher is every author’s dream. But beware of book contract nightmares.
Never sign a book contract with a publisher without doing your homework first.

There are so many small publishers nowadays offering publishing agreements, and while some are good, there are many that are not so good, or worse.

Even among some well-known small publishers, problems have arisen with overdue payment or no payment of royalties to authors.

In recent times, Ellora’s Cave has experienced financial difficulty, and it seems as if it is now taking legal action against the RWA, who asked Ellora’s Cave to pay overdue royalties.

To read the full article go to:

https://justpublishingadvice.com/authors-beware-think-twice-before-signing-a-contract/

3 New Agents Actively Seeking Mysteries, Fantasy, Romance, YA & MG, Nonfiction and More…

Erica Verrillo provides us with names of agents actively seeking manuscripts in different genres. Thank you so much Erica!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Erica Verrillo  on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are three new agents seeking clients.

Jennie Kendrick is interested in YA and MG fiction, particularly Own Voices works.

Sandra Jordan represents mysteries exclusively.

Whitney Ross represents middle grade, young adult, and adult fiction across all genres, with an emphasis on historical, SF & fantasy, romance, and contemporary fiction. She is also open to non-fiction submissions in the areas of design, cooking, and fashion.

ALWAYS check the agency website before submitting. Agents may switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements may change.

See full details HERE

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Romance Publishers Who Accept Unsolicited Manuscripts – 2018 – written by Bryn Donovan

Lots of my readers want to know more about how to get published, so last week, I shared a list of fantasy and science fiction publishers who accept unagented submissions. This week, I’m doing the same thing with romance!

This isn’t a comprehensive list. Romance is a huge genre, and there are lots of opportunities out there for writers who don’t have agents.

I’ve left off some publishers because I just haven’t heard anything about them yet. I’ve also left off a few that specialize in certain types of erotic romance, because I have a lot of underage readers on this blog (although most of the publishers here do publish racy stuff as well.)

If there’s a publisher you believe should be added to the list, let me know via a private message at bryndonovan@bryndonovan.com.

The name of each publisher is a live link to their submission guidelines. Follow those exactly for the best results!

 

To read the full post click here:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/01/15/romance-publishers-who-accept-unsolicited-manuscripts-2018/

Fantasy and Science Fiction Publishers Who Accept Unsolicited Manuscripts – 2018 – written by Bryn Donovan

Hey there! I know many of my readers aspire to publishing a novel, and many of them write fantasy and science fiction, so I put this post together to help them. I did a post like this a couple of years back, but it needed updating!

Many publishing houses won’t accept submissions except through agents. If an author’s hoping for a big book deal, it probably makes sense to try to find an agent first. (And don’t submit to publishers while you’re looking for an agent. If someone is considering representing you, it’s going to be awkward to explain to them that four publishers have already turned you down.) Signing with a great agent can feel like winning the lottery, but even then, it can be a long road to the contract of your dreams.

But what if you haven’t been able to find an agent? Or you suspect what you’re writing is a little weirder or more niche than what agents are looking for, or if you’re just in a hurry?

Here’s a roundup of publishers who accept unsolicited manuscripts. Most of them are smaller houses, but a few are pretty big names. I’m including publishing houses that have open calls now and again, even if they’re not open to unagented submissions at the moment.

 

To read the full blog post, click here:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/01/08/fantasy-and-science-fiction-publishers-who-accept-unsolicited-manuscripts-2018/#respond

Publisher Shopping

Angela Kays Books published an interesting, informative and wonderfully emotional article about her experience with deciding which way to go with her writing. Thank you so much for this blog post! I will get there too soon enough and I appreciate everything I can find.

Lit World Interviews

With my first manuscript finished, it’s time for me to start shopping around for ways to get my novel published. Originally, I wanted to go the way of an agent. I thought it’d bImage result for shoppinge so cool to actually have an agent to want to represent me. I still think so. However, I’ve slowly realized, even before published authors told me, that the publishing world changed drastically from ten, or even five, years ago.

The worse part of it all is that it always depend first on who you know, then it depends on whether you’ve published anything already. It’s a disheartening process. I’ve thought many times that I need to figure out a new direction for my life. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: the only problem with that is I’m 33 years old, and the only thing I feel I know to do is write…

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