How to Find Publishers & Agents – Written By Jane Friedman

Thank you for your information about the search for publishers and agents, Jane Friedman!


 

If you have a book idea or a manuscript, one of your first questions is probably:

How do I find a publisher?

Or, if you’re more advanced in your knowledge of book publishing, you may ask:

How do I find a literary agent?

The good news: there’s no shortage of resources for researching publishers and agents. The bad news: you can easily spend hours going down the rabbit hole of available information.

Continue reading HERE

4 New Agents Seeking Romance, Fantasy, YA, Literary Fiction, Nonfiction, Memoir and more – Written By Erica Verrillo

Thank you very much for this information about agents looking for books, Erica Verrillo. We really appreciate your help!


on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are four new literary agents actively seeking clients.

Mariah Nichols is interested in adult and young adult fiction with genres including thriller, upmarket, romance/rom-com, horror, family drama, science fiction/paranormal, and women’s fiction. She is also wanting to represent nonfiction in categories such as cookbooks, memoirs, self-help, lifestyle, and how-to. Stories that showcase diversity and highlight mental health or special needs is something that she would especially like to see.

Amy Giuffrida wants middle grade and YA horror, romance, fantasy and mystery as well as adult Horror, Romance/Chic Lit/Rom Com and nonfiction.

Shanna Furey is looking for Historical Fiction and Non-Fiction, Mystery, Fantasy, Young Adult, Comedic, or General Fiction. Devon Halliday is interested in literary and upmarket fiction with sharp, insightful writing and vivid characters. She’s partial to speculative fiction, women’s fiction, contemporary fiction, metafiction, light psychological suspense, and romcoms. She leans toward adult fiction, but will also consider YA and cross-over projects.

On the nonfiction side Devon is on the lookout for creative and narrative nonfiction, investigative journalism, broad-perspective memoir, and popular science, psychology, medicine, and philosophy.

Always check the agency website and agent bio before submitting. Agents can switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change.

Get Full Details HERE

 

3 New Agents Seeking Science Fiction, MG, YA, Memoirs, Literary Fiction, Nonfiction and more – Written By Erica Verrillo

Erica Verrillo provides us with three agents who are accepting manuscripts at the moment. Thank you, Erica!


Here are three new agents seeking clients. New agents are a boon to writers. They are actively expanding their lists and will go the extra mile for their clients.

Megan Barnard wants adult fiction, thrillers, memoirs, fairy-tale retellings, women’s fiction, family sagas, and historical fiction.

 

Ashley Herring Blake is acquiring projects in Middle Grade, Young Adult, and Adult fiction.

 

 

Reeves Hamilton is seeking Science fiction – particularly hard Sci-Fi, space opera, climate dystopias, and alternative histories, with some other interest in dark fantasy and classic-style sword and sorcery.

 

Always check the agency website and agent bio before submitting.

Agents can switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change.

Get Full Details HERE

Book Blog Reviews and Bookstagram: How Influencers Help Authors Reach Agents, Publishers, and Readers – Written By Julie Valerie

Julie Valerie writes a guest post on Anne R. Allen’s blog about influencers that can help authors reach agents, publishers, and readers. Thank you very much, Julie!


From Book Blog to Book Deal.

First things first, because I’m sure this question is on a lot of writer’s minds: does a book blog still land a book deal?

My answer? Of course, they do. Great writing and great content will always find an audience, and where there’s an audience, especially a sizable one, there’s typically a book deal waiting to happen. Think Julie Powell, Candice Bushnell, Jen Lancaster, and Jenny Lawson.

Not to mention, entire empires (with books launched along the way), have been built on the humble foundations of blog sites that just wouldn’t quit. Think ProBlogger’s Darren Rowse and Content Marketing Institute’s Joe Pulizzi.

Continue reading HERE

 

7 Great Writing Conferences in February 2019 – By Erica Verillo

Erica Verillo published a post about 7 Writer’s Conferences taking place in February in the U.S. Thank you very much for the great information, Erica!


Conferences are not only the best way to meet agents, get tips from other writers, and learn about the publishing industry, they make you feel like a writer. We all need community, and this is how we, as writers, get the necessary incentive to keep writing.

All of these conferences and workshops charge tuition, but some offer financial assistance. There are deadlines for applying for aid, so make sure you plan ahead.

For a month-by-month list of conferences throughout the year see: Writing Conferences. (You will also find links to resources that can help you find conferences in your area on that page.)
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The Writers Studio, sponsored by the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program, February 7 – 10, 2019, Los Angeles, CA. The conference offers workshops in fiction and creative nonfiction, as well as writing for television and film. Offered by the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program, the Writers Studio brings together a community of writing students to workshop with some of Southern California’s most accomplished writers and teachers. From among the 10 offered, participants choose one workshop in which they work closely with a professional writer in classes limited to no more than 15 people.

Get all the information here:

https://publishedtodeath.blogspot.com/2019/01/7-writing-conferences-in-february-2019.html

Finding the Best Freelance Fiction Editor

Steven Capps has published an interesting and helpful blog post about editors and how to find them. Thanks so much Steven. This helps many of us.

Bard & Books

Welcome back to the blog! Before we begin, I want to highlight a few things that are not quite relevant to today’s post, which will be focused on how to hire a goodfreelance editor. If you are only here for that info, go ahead and scroll down. If you enjoy the content, I would love for you to hit the follow button just below the comment section. No pressure, and if this is the worst thing you’ve ever read, I’ll go sit in the corner of shame.

For everyone still reading this intro, I am assuming that you are one of the regulars, so thank you again for all your support. A few weeks ago, I posted a few episodes of a podcast, though it pittered out because in the subsequent interviews there was a super annoying static that I only recently fixed. Obviously, I couldn’t post these because…

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10 Things I’ve Learned From Self-Publishing

Ryan Lanz shares his experiences with self publishing. There is a lot of useful information. Thank you Ryan!

A Writer's Path

learn-letters

by J.U. Scribe

It’s been three years since I self published my first book. It’s definitely been a learning experience marked by relative successes and failures. As I mark the 3rd anniversary since I self-published Before the Legend , here are the top ten things I’ve learned over the course of three years in no particular order.

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Writing a Synopsis #wwwblogs #writinganovel

Thank you very much Allison Williams for this excellent blog post on how to write a synopsis! Every bit, every word, every single advice helps us beginners. I’m grateful!

Alison Williams Writing

writing_humour_synopsis-scaled500 (1)jenspenden.com

I’ve worked with lots of writers who can compose the most beautiful prose, bring scenes to vivid life, make me care about their characters, keep me turning the page, but these same writers find one thing almost impossible to do – they can’t write a synopsis.

What is it about a synopsis that has so many writers struggling? It doesn’t seem to matter how great a writer you are, there’s just something about condensing your masterpiece down into one or two sides of A4 that strikes fear into a writer’s heart.

And I think that’s the issue. As authors, we spend so long on our books, every last detail is important to us. A synopsis asks us to get to the heart of the story, to strip away to the bare bones – and that can be really hard when you are so close to the world you’ve created…

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Writing a Query Letter #wwwblogs #writinganovel

Query letters. Am I the only one who is scared of them and really wants to do it RIGHT? Not only ‘right’ but ‘RIGHT’… I think this is such an important blog post who might give me more than a hint! Thank you Alison for sharing this!

Alison Williams Writing

query letter pic 3

While it’s true that the world of publishing is changing, and that many authors are happy to self-publish, some writers still wish to find an agent, and so will need to introduce themselves with a query letter.

What’s important

It’s absolutely vital to remember that this letter is the first example of your writing that an agent will see, so make it count. These are the key things to remember:

  • Address your letter to a specific agent – avoid Dear Sir/Madam.  Using a name shows that you’ve selected that agent – not just stuck a pin in ‘The Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook’
  • Make it clear you’ve done your homework – state why you’re approaching that particular agent (similar authors? Looking for your genre?)
  • Make your book sound interesting
  • State the genre and word length
  • Include any details of your writing history – competitions, publications, experience
  • Keep it formal, keep it…

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