It’s Writing You’re Worth – Guest Post by JannyC

Writing was not my first career choice. In fact, I avoided the career path like the plague. It was not a logical choice, or so I was told.  Being a writer is a dream.  What if being a writer is a destiny and sometimes there are some destines you cannot escape. Hello nice to meet you. Let me introduce myself I am a writer.

 

The Beginning

To be honest I have been telling stories since I was 4. They were all in my head acted out via Barbie’s, or She-Ra action figures or me with my friends outside on the playground. This made sense for my first step into the writing world was being a comic book script writer. Writing was a destiny I could not escape. I’ve been writing in this business off and on for nearly 8 years. Freelancing writing is the kind of job that is a side job not your main job to pay the bills with. “Writing” was a dream. I almost believed it. I had stopped writing when one day I got an email from a total stranger. They said they missed seeing my work. When was, my book coming out that I had mentioned I was writing? One person even offered me money to help with my writing career (I declined in case you are wondering.). Next day another email from a young girl who said I inspired her to write herself could I read a sample of her book. BAFLING!

 

Jump Starting

I decided to dive back into my writing taking a serious stab at freelancing writing as my career. I found jobs, but they were usually low paying, no recognition, plus they worked you like a mule job. Hey it was a job, right? You had to start at the bottom and you’re your way, up right? Problem was what I didn’t know was I was selling myself way below my worth. Add onto it these jobs were getting me nowhere. I was writing anonymously. I was not getting KNOWN. All the articles I wrote were basically ghostwritten. If I was to show someone my portfolio what did I have to show?

 

Writing You’re Worth

It took the help of my husband to finally convince me I was not writing my worth. I believed since I did not have the prestige like most writers do of going to college my experience did not count. I schooled myself actually learning first-hand the world of authors and publishers. One thing I learned was that when you are passionate about something you instantly possess that thicker layer of skin they talk about. The literary world can be brutal my friend, and the grammar police are very REAL.  I got truly convinced though when I wrote an article for my husband’s boss for his business and he paid $50.00 for my top-notch work. He loved the article saying to my husband his wife was a phenomenal writer. This made me think. Maybe I WAS not writing my worth.  I decided no more taking writing mill jobs. No more charging low prices because I am some little indie writer.

 

Discovering My Worth

So, what happened? I avoided the sent per word pricing. You can say I am at intermediate level so I just went with a flat rate. I do book promotions and each package includes a complementary book review that goes on Amazon and my blog as well as a promotion week of their book. I had 3 packages people could choose from. $10.00 for one book $20. If you had two books and $30. For 3 or more books. I was very cheap, thinking indie authors will love this. I am so affordable! I was only drawing in $30 to $40 bucks at the most. After discovering my worth I raised my prices to $15., $26, $60.  This seemed to draw more peoples interest in me. More orders started coming in. I had one client order $103.66 dollars ‘worth. It seemed I was doing better charging more that I was charging less! I also had the proof to back up my work via my blog and website I created.

 

If you feel like you’re struggling, ask yourself are you writing your worth?


dsc09294About our guest author JannyC:

JannyC is a published author (Writing under the pen name of Jan Marie.) and freelance writer. She currently writes at Indie Promotions where she helps writers and entertainers promote their work. follow her on

Twitter @ReviewerJannyC

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Indiebookpromotions/

Linkined: www.linkedin.com/in/janis-cramlett-a08b3673

How do I communicate with people coming to my Facebook event?

Liz Dexter from libroediting.com provided us with an extraordinary article on how to communicate with people coming to my facebook event. What a gem. Thank you, Liz!

liz_fb-event

LibroEditing proofreading, editing, transcription, localisation

This article follows on from How Do I Create A Facebook Event? and you should read that one first if you’re starting out on the process. Today we’re talking about how to communicate to the guests who are attending your Facebook event.

How can I get in touch with people attending my Facebook event?

There are two ways to do this: add a post to the event, or message attendees.

Adding a post to the event

Once you’ve created an event, when you go into the event page, you will find that it looks quite like a normal Facebook newsfeed. On the left-hand side, you will find an option to Write Post / Add Photo/Video or Create Poll (you can create a poll to find out people’s music or food preferences, for example).

Type your message into the text box and hit Post and your message will be visible on…

View original post 312 more words

Let Me Show YOU How To Use Internet Radio – Guest Post…

On The Story Reading Ape’s blog I found a guest post today, written by author Annette Rochelle Aben in which she informs us how to use internet radio. Thank you for this very helpful article, Annette!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

31948784 - abstract radio antenna tower icon isolated on white background. wireless communication technology concept.Image Licensed from 123RF Stock Photo Copyright: farakos

Greetings!  I am Annette Rochelle Aben and in addition to writing and publishing books, I am also an internet radio show host.

That’s right, you can visit my network The PerspectivePower on BlogTalkRadio and enjoy my podcasts right this very moment!

AofG01

Oh, and I do suggest that you FOLLOW the network, so you can stay current with my programs.

 So, how did I come to start The Perspectivepower Radio Network?

Back in 2009, I wrote a book called: Perspective, it’s all about replacing one thought with another (available through my Author Central Page on Amazon) and I wanted to get some free marketing.

Now, I don’t remember how, but I had heard about Blog Talk Radio and thought, as I had a radio background already, that I would investigate. I was so glad that I did.

 Found out…

View original post 602 more words

Registered Copyright or Not?

This is an informative, interesting and very important blog post for not only new, but all writers. Thank you so much for sharing Claire!

Plaisted Publishing House

The Why’s and Why Not’s of Copyright.

I’ve been surprised by the differences of copyright offered in the countries an Author resides in, along side how long it can take to get Registered Copyright, especially in the USA.  So what is all the fuss about, why do some authors go for registered and other, like myself, don’t bother.

Well the answer to why I don’t bother with registered copyright is because it isn’t an option here in New Zealand.  According to research I’ve done we only have what some authors call ‘The Poor Man’s Copyright.’  So are we in New Zealand as protected by International Law as others.  Yes we are.  So why is registered copyright so important in the USA?  Why is it so slow?  

In the UK they do registered copyright online.  I have yet to establish if anyone world wide can apply, or if…

View original post 427 more words

March 3 – National Anthem Day

Author Sharla Shults has published an absolutely amazing blog post about a National Celebration Day:

 

March 3 – National Anthem Day

 

Sharla Shults has the most amazing way of describing history, bring us our roots back and make us remember what’s really important.

Please check out her wonderful post:

 

http://awakenings2012.blogspot.ch/2016/03/oh-say-can-you-see.html

 

 

Picture courtesy of: "Blingee" and borrowed from Sharla Shults' blog.
Picture courtesy of: “Blingee” and borrowed from Sharla Shults’ blog.

Kiss your muse hello

“There’s no rule on how to write. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling rock and then blasting it out with charges,” – Ernest Hemingway

 

To many writers, Ernst Hemingway is an idol, the ‘ultimate writer’.  He is undoubtedly a legend. The legend once said, an unhappy childhood was the best early training for a writer. Malicious gossip has it that Hemingway wrote his best work while unhappy and drunk.

 

Erich Maria Remarque, author of All Quiet on the Western Front, was said to be notoriously depressive, and drew on his creativity from the deepest abyss of his sadness.

 

There are so many amazing authors, and each one of them is driven by a different motivation. But what if motivation is resting and creativity hiding? How can the sleeping muse be awoken?

 

Numerous ways to find motivation:

 

  • coffee or tea
  • rain storms
  • music
  • read a good book
  • conversations
  • listen to stories
  • a nice dinner
  • wonderful dreams
  • the desire to create a world/story/fairy tale
  • long walks
  • peace and silence
  • spending time outside (on the beach or in the woods)
  • calm backyard in the shade

 

This is only a small number of possibilities. After all, there are so many more – too many to count.

 

But what if an author can’t find it? What if the muse is on vacation, creativity asleep and motivation in a coma? What if writer’s block has kicked in?

 

The American Author, Joyce Carol Cates, said: “I don’t think that writer’s block exists really. I think that, when you’re trying to do something prematurely, it just won’t come. Certain subjects just need time… You’re got to wait before you write about them.”

 

Erica Jong states: “All writing problems are psychological problems. Blocks usually stem from the fear of being judged.” And Norma Mailer informs: “Writer’s block is only a failure of the ego.”

 

These are famous authors who tell you what might cause it, but how do we end it? Hilary Mantel advises: “If you get stuck, get away from your desk. Take a walk, take a bath, bot to sleep, make a pie, draw, listen to music, meditate, exercise, whatever you do, don’t just stick there scowling at the problem. But don’t make telephone calls or go to a party; if you do, other people’s words will pour in where your lost words should be. Open a gap for them, create a space. Be patient.”

 

But who is right? The ones telling us that writer’s block doesn’t exist, or those who believe it can be overcome? Does it matter? What authors want, is to write – having or not having writer’s block or ‘just being stuck’ is not a question that needs to be asked.

 

So how can we kiss the muse awake again?

 

Many famous writers have discussed the benefits of working and writing in piece and silence. Their advice is to get your own room and be able, and willing, to close the door.

 

Some writers work with background music, others write around their cats or with their dog, sleeping on their feet. I figure there are as many writing preferences as writers exist.

 

I personally love to write in the backyard, by the pool. I don’t mind hearing street workers, tree saws, or sirens in the distance. Dogs barking or a kid screaming or laughing is fine with me. When I’m in my story, I am too focused to really hear these sounds.

 

When I worked on a romantic short story a while back, I tried to write within a romantic and unusual environment, and found a spot near a waterfall. I love waterfalls – normally. That day I was delighted – for about 25 minutes. After that, I was bothered by the sound. The permanent flow of water made me nervous and fidgety, and I had to repeatedly interrupt the flow of the story to go to the bathroom. No need to say I didn’t write anything useful that day.

 

If you find the perfect place and surroundings in which to write, I personally recommend that you stay with it. Decorate away – create a space you can feel comfortable. Nobody else will be there. Make it yours. Wake your motivation by doing something that builds the perfect situation to make your inspiration flow.

 

If this means the room needs to look like an Arabian Harem or an Abbey cell, so be it. Rumors are that Barbara Cartland spoke her books on Dictaphone, within the silk and tulle of her Barbie pink bedroom.

 

I have to admit, writing romance within a romantic surrounding is one thing, but building a room that rots my teeth (sickly sweet) would be taking it a little too far. But that doesn’t mean it wouldn’t suit another writer. As the saying goes, ‘To each his own’.

 

To end this article, I’d like to quote one more famous and excellent writer:

“Writing isn’t about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid, or making friends. In the end, it’s about enriching the lives of those who will read your work, and enriching your own life, as well. It’s about getting up, getting well, and getting over. Getting happy, okay? Getting happy.” – Stephen King

Picture courtesy of: http://www.michaelmosaics.com/articles/theninemuses.html
Picture courtesy of: http://www.michaelmosaics.com/articles/theninemuses.html

To Prologue or NOT To Prologue? That is the Question

This is another great blog post which might help many writers. It’s written by Kristen Lamb and does answer many of my questions. I’m sure I won’t be the only author who learns a lot from this article.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Image via Flikr Creative Commons, via Mikko Luntiala Image via Flikr Creative Commons, via Mikko Luntiala

Publishing, like most other things, is not immune to fashion. This is what makes teaching craft a moving target. What is en vogue today could be passé tomorrow. And yes we are artists, but I believe most of us are artists who’ve grown rather fond of eating. This means we do need to keep audience tastes in mind when we are “creating” since they will be the ones who fork over cold hard cash.

Today we will touch on a question I get a lot from new writers.

To prologue or not to prologue? That is the question.

The problem with the prologue is it has kind of gotten a bad rap over the years, especially with agents. They generally hate them. Why? In my opinion, it is because far too many writers don’t use prologues properly and that, in itself, has…

View original post 1,515 more words

An Essential List Every Author Should Read

Picture courtesy of: http://www.derekhaines.ch/justpublishing/an-essential-list-every-author-should-read/
Picture courtesy of: http://www.derekhaines.ch/justpublishing/an-essential-list-every-author-should-read/

 

I personally think it’s important that we do share this with our upcoming new authors. Being one of them myself it scared me half to death. But hearing the truth – and reading this list is still important – and it leaves me a choice. Do I want to continue? Or do I just look out for another dream?

 

 

 

 

http://www.derekhaines.ch/justpublishing/an-essential-list-every-author-should-read/

 

Publishing Scam

I personally think this is an excellent article to inform in particular new authors about danger to lose money and how to identify scam. Quite informative in my opinion.

Jens Thoughts

scam-alert-picI don’t think I’ve ever posted about publishing scams, but we all know they are out there. I’m a subscriber to Indies Unlimited and they reached out asking if I would post this information concerning new scams. Since we are all writers, I thought it would be a good post.

Many Independent Authors Have Escaped from Predatory Publishing

Arlington, VA (April 7) – More than a quarter of independent authors who responded to a recent survey at IndiesUnlimited.com said they definitely had, or might have, fallen victim to a predatory publisher before turning to self-publishing. The survey results were published on the blog this week.

Indies Unlimited conducted the unscientific survey as part of its #PublishingFoul series, which featured true stories from scammed authors throughout the month of March.

“Although our 115 respondents were self-selected, I think our results are pretty accurate,” said staff writer and former journalist Lynne Cantwell…

View original post 363 more words