Just in Time for Halloween – Written By Cary Vaughn

The writer of ‘The Reluctant Cat Owner’s Journal,’ Cary Vaughn, has published a blog post I could not deprive you of enjoying. The author is, of course, a cat daddy and also an unbelievably gifted writer. No matter what the situation with the cats is, Cary masters it, writers about it, and makes his devoted fans (like me) laugh. Thanks so much for this wonderful post, Cary. And speedy recovery to the kitty!


 

As I’ve mentioned before, Predator Face has a habit of sneezing phlegm onto our walls and floor since the day of his adoption. In my opinion, this has made housekeeping more laborious than necessary.

As I’ve also mentioned before, Predator Face recently lost the ability to breath through his nose, making him sound like a snotty, mouth-breathing toddler with the flu. Not, stertorous. More slurpy, like breathing through a mouthful of gelatin.

 

At first, his condition was pathetic and sad. But it didn’t take long before the slurpy mouth breathing became a nuisance. For example, I no longer woke in the middle of the night to the adorable rumbling of his purr as he nudged me for attention.

CONTINUE READING HERE

The Benefits of Writing a Novel By Hand – Written By Bryn Donovan

Since I write my first drafts by hand for years, I found this article, written by Bryn Donovan, fascinating, and also very assuring that I apparently don’t do my things in a completely wrong way. Thank you, Bryn!


I love writing on paper. Few things spark joy in me like a brand-new spiral notebook—and that’s been true almost my whole life. Writing a novel longhand, at least for the first draft, is my personal preference. I don’t write the whole thing by hand before typing it: I transfer it to Word document on my computer now and then as I go.

Every writer is different, and I’m not going to claim that writing a novel by hand is right for everyone. I know that writing on paper isn’t even an option for everyone.

Besides, writing a novel longhand does have its disadvantages. It’s slower, since you’re going to wind up typing it on the computer later, anyway. And if you’re unable to decipher your own handwriting, which is true for lots of people, writing on paper for your first draft is pretty much a non-starter.

Here are a few benefits of writing a story longhand, though. If it’s doable for you and you haven’t tried it, you might want to give it a go, just to see if you like it!

 

CONTINUE READING HERE

Sundance – A New 5-Star review

I am so proud to discover that Sundance, the second book in ‘The Council Of Twelve’ series got a new 5-star review. This is wonderful.


Reviewed in the United States on September 15, 2020

Following ‘Soul Taker’, ‘Sundance’ is the second book in the Council of Twelve Series.
The book is less a simple sequel than a parallel story to the first part, which first surprised me, but then I was enthusiastic about that fact. I found it fascinating to read the story from a different point of view and to find the skillfully orchestrated connections to the first book.
One of the things I love about this book is to see Sundance grow up into a strong woman. Also interesting is her education. Even though the book shows many known characters and places, the book still allows the reader to re-explore the world, AJ Alexander created masterfully.
I look forward to reading book number three in the series.
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Successful Self-Publishing: Build Your Brand – Written By Laurisa White Reyes

I found an interesting article published by Laurisa White Reyes. Thank you so much for your advice, Laurisa


on Fiction University:

Getting Personal

If you are not comfortable tooting your own horn, welcome to the club. Writers tend to be introverts by nature. Most of us do not like drawing attention to ourselves. In fact, give us a quiet corner in an empty house for hours on end, and we’d be quite content – as long as we have our computers to keep us company.

But if you want to sell books, you need fans – not fans of your books – fans of YOU! It’s not always about the story you’ve written. Yes, of course, you want your readers to love your books, and they will. But before they ever hit that BUY link on Amazon, they must have a good reason for doing so, and that reason is their loyalty to you as a person.

Continue reading HERE

7 Ways to Boost Your Author Brand – Written By Nicholas Rossis

Nicholas Rossis gives us insight into seven ways to boost our author brand. Thank you so much for this great post, Nicholas!


The inspiration (and Infographic) for this post came from Resume Now, which has an article about branding yourself. While they are focusing on job applications, what they say is remarkably useful for those building an author brand, too. I am summarizing below, but I suggest you also visit the original post for more ideas and examples of successful brands.

How to Develop an Author Brand

Developing an author brand helps add value and credibility to your books. Here are seven steps to help you get started.

1. Find a Niche

The first step in building your author brand is to find your niche. Some questions to help foster this process are:

  • What are your passions and interests?
  • What credentials do you possess?
  • What types of writing do you particularly love working on?
  • What makes you forget to look at the clock?

It’s crucial to find a niche that can evolve with you. Your interests are not stagnant, so choosing an area of focus with growth potential is crucial for long-term satisfaction.

2. Determine a Target Audience

Once you’ve identified your niche, you should figure out who your target audience is and how to tailor your author brand to them.

Continue Reading Here

 

7 Misconceptions About Being a Writer – Written By K.M. Weiland…

K. M. Weiland provides us with a blog post describing misconceptions about being a writer. Thank you very much, K. M. Weiland!

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on Helping Writers become Authors:

Like any good story, the writing life is a tale of deceptive depth.

At first glance, it offers up a shiny, artsy, fun cover. Become a Writer! its title beckons, and its first chapters lure us in by fulfilling all these initial promises.

But the deeper we get, the further we go, the more we realize there’s more to this story than meets the eye.

There’s more adventure, more conflict, more drama, and more comedy than we could ever have realized.

In short, there are many different misconceptions about being a writer.

Continue reading HERE

How To Republish A Book For Self-Published Authors – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines informs us in his article about how to republish a book for self-published authors. Thank you so very much for all your hard work, Derek!

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on Just Publishing Advice:

Can a self-published book be republished?

Yes, if you have self-published a book, you can update it at any time and as often as you like.

You can change, modify, merge, or improve your book for both ebook and print versions.

You can update the cover design, change your genre and category listings and fine-tune, or find new keyword listings.

In This Article

How to republish a book
The big advantage of self-publishing
It’s always possible to improve a book
Add images
Add links to an ebook
Check your formatting
Choose better categories and keywords
There is always room for improvement
Unpublish and republish
Summary

Continue reading HERE

The Truth – And How I Use My Characters To Say It

Picture courtesy of http://www.thepowerofoneness.com/blog/tag/live-your-truth/

Don’t we all wish sometimes we could just tell the truth instead of juggling tactfully around saying what the other one would like to hear? Let me give you a few examples.

Imagine, a hair salon, somewhere in a big city… the walls are covered with breathtaking hairstyles on equally breathtaking people, the hairstylist expects his next appointment.

A customer enters and points to one of the pictures on the wall, telling the hairdresser: “I want exactly that hairstyle here.”

Now, what does the hairstylist want to say? “Well, I’m afraid, that is a misunderstanding. See, this is a professional model, a really beautiful human being. Whereas you are a caprice of nature… barely to look at.”

What does the stylist say eventually? “Aaawww. What an excellent choice. That cut will frame your face wonderfully. I’m convinced it will look splendidly on you.”

Or, let’s have a look at another example:

Parents are invited to a parent’s conference day, and they’re meeting their kids’ teacher.

Imagine what the teacher would like to say: “Ah, yes. Your son Willy. A complete idiot. About as intelligent as six feet of dirt track… I’m surprised how this child finds the door in the morning to leave the house. My advice to you: set him free; start from scratch.”

What does he say? “Your son. He is intelligent but does have a few difficulties to focus and concentrate. There are practices and exercises to improve that. But I’m convinced the older he gets, the easier it will be for him…”

Or, how do you tell parents that their child is not the cutest on earth? Ask them for a picture. Then you study it for a few minutes and say: “Aha… hmm… you know…. are you sure that this is indeed the face?”

Of course, our society does not accept the naked truth. We all know words can hurt, and we don’t want to hurt people, nor do we want to be hurt. That’s when our ability to successfully veil our replies in conversations, create our answers in a way to compliment the other person, and hide what we really think.

At this point, I admit, it is a relief at times, to use my characters to speak what ‘they’ think, and of course, use them to write what I think. I rarely refer to a particular person or situation. But I permit my characters at times, to be as outspoken, open, bold, and sometimes rude, as I would never dare to be in public.

At times I wonder, if crime authors use their books to ‘kill people’ they don’t like in real life.

What would you permit your character to do what you cannot do or say in your real life? Let me know in the comments, I’m curious.

 

Writing a Memoir – 5 Rules – Written By Karen Coiffi

Do you plan to write your memoir? If yes, don’t miss Karen Coiffi’s blog post. She provides us with rules to write our memoir. Thank you very much, Karen!


on Writers on the Move:


Writing a memoir is different things to different people. Some people are looking for closure, or a cathartic release from a traumatic event in their lives, others simply want to share their experiences with readers. Or possibly, the author wants to impart some wisdom or insight to the reader.

Whatever the reason behind writing a memoir, there are a few rules that should be adhered to.

Continue reading HERE

So, I have some good news! – Written By Kawanee Hamilton

Author Kawanee Hamilton reports that her writing is progressing. I cannot wait to start reading her work. She’s a wonderful writer and just recently picked up her work again. Way to go, lady!


It’s been a long time coming, but I FINALLY finished editing my Paranormal Romance called Nwa Pante Rising… (I’m not married to this title, so if anyone has suggestions, I am open to them.)

Nwa Pante is Mayan for Black Panther, the book is sprinkled with phrases from the Mayan and Lakota languages. It has a little bit of everything; magic, science, romance, sex (I mean when a were-panther goes into heat, it’s gonna happen. If this offends you… please don’t bother reading it.) there’s kidnapping, torture, murder, mystery and yeah, scifi as well. 🙂 As usual, the book is written with my weird sense of humor, and our heroine has a bit of it.

Continue Reading Here