Choosing your Audiobook Voice – Written By Nicholas Rossis

I found this great post on how to pick our audio book voice on Nicholas Rossis blog. Thanks for sharing your experience, Nicholas. I’m convinced I’m not the only grateful writer!


As audiobooks are the fastest-growing segment in publishing, I have been researching that market. One thing I realized is that choosing a narrator is probably the most important decision you make when you turn your book into an Audiobook. People who love audiobooks may buy your audiobook because they like your work, your genre, your cover, or your price. When they actually start listening to your audiobook however, one of the most important factors to decide whether they’ll continue listening to the end, is the quality of the reading.

So, how do you choose the right voice? Leaving out the financial aspects (if you can afford to pay the narrator the fee he is asking for or if you choose a royalty scheme), there are a few issues to take into consideration, from “demographics” to acting performance. Here are a few tips.

Demographics

So. Man or Woman? Younger or Older?

These questions are mostly answered through the characteristics of your book. Obviously, if your book is written in the first person, you need to match the voice to your own narrator. If your narrator is a young woman, so should be your voice. If he is a middle-aged southern cop, you obviously need an older man, possibly with an accent (we will discuss accents in a moment).

The choice is less obvious if your book is not a first-person tale. In this case, there is no rule of thumb, but there are several issues you can take into consideration to form a preference.

Continue reading the blog post here:

Choosing your Audiobook Voice

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The Four Essential Elements You Need To Sell Books On Amazon – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines informs us about the four essential elements we need to sell books on Amazon. Thank you for sharing your experience, Derek. We really appreciate it!


 

Have you written a book you want to sell?

You have? Well, you are probably very excited about the prospect of becoming a published author, and rightly so.

But before you jump into self-publishing your book, sit back and take a deep breath. You have some work to do before you publish that will help sell books on Amazon after your book is released.

Selling books online today is very competitive. Every year more and more authors are publishing books and ebooks on Amazon, Apple, Kobo and Barnes & Noble.

By some estimates, a new title is published every one minute and forty-five seconds on Amazon KDP alone.

Many of these thousands of titles are never going to succeed at selling on Amazon. Either because the writing standard is poor, the cover is homemade, or in a lot of cases nowadays, many are merely copies of public domain books.

To read the entire blog post go to:

The Four Essential Elements You Need To Sell Books On Amazon

 

How To Pitch Your Novel In Person To An Editor or Agent – Written By Bryn Donovan

I found a great post published by Bryn Donovan on her blog. To many writers her article provides valuable information on how to pitch in person. Thank you very much Bryn.


Hi friends! I’m writing this post at SleuthFest, a terrific writers’ conference for mystery and thriller writers. As an acquiring editor, I’ve spent hours here hearing novel pitches and chatting with writers. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I love talking with fiction writers about their projects, so I enjoyed it.

Writing conferences often set up agent and editor appointments so that writers can pitch their work in person. The goal is usually to have the agent or editor say, “Yes, send me the full manuscript,” Beyond that, it’s an opportunity to learn more about an editor and agent and to make a connection.

To read the entire article, click here:

How To Pitch Your Novel In Person To An Editor or Agent

 

Newsletter – A Writer’s Stepchild – Information Written By Jenn Henson-DePaula

Many authors don’t know how important their newsletter is. I’m still working on that too. I think I made significant progress lately, but I’m still a beginner. On the Mixtus-Media blog I found two phenomenal posts, written by Jenn Henson-DePaula. She helps us with her experience and makes it easier for us to connect with our readers and subscribers. Thank you, Jenn!


How To Easily Create a Year’s Worth of Amazing Newsletter Content

Tell me if this sounds familiar:

I have a blog, so why do I need a newsletter?
No one reads newsletters! Why even bother?
I don’t want to bother people with a newsletter.
I don’t have time to write a newsletter!

I’ve heard it all. And I get it! When we first started Mixtus Media I put off starting a newsletter because I had those same thoughts running through my head.

But here’s the thing: a newsletter is one of the most important assets to incorporate into your book marketing plan.

Continue reading this post here

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25 Newsletter Incentive Ideas for Fiction Authors

When a reader signs up for your newsletter, they are moving from a mere spectator to a participant – someone who is one step closer to buying your book.
The key to growing a solid and thriving newsletter is to approach the process from the viewpoint of your readers. This will give you more clarity in what to provide for your readers and it will make your newsletter so much more effective.

When you focus on growing your newsletter list, one of the best ways is to provide a hook to make readers want to sign up by offering a free incentive. Offering a well-crafted incentive also ensures that you get the right people signed up for your newsletter – your ideal readers.
But for fiction writers, it can be difficult to think of creative or innovative incentives to drive interest.
The go-to incentive for most authors is the free chapter download. Now don’t get me wrong, this is a fine incentive, but nearly every author out there offers this.
To stand out and to offer great value to your growing audience, it helps to think outside of the box.

Continue reading the blog post here

7 Myths of Using Press Releases to Promote Your Books – Written By Joan Stewart

Joan Stewart of “The Book Designer” blog provides us with a great blog post about 7 myths of using press releases to promote our books. Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge with us!


When an author plans a book launch and hires me to write the press release, I often learn fairly quickly that she has no clue about the kinds of results to expect.

That’s because she asks questions like these:

– “How many books do you think I’ll sell from the press release?”
– “How many TV and radio shows will schedule me to appear as a guest?”
– “How many newspapers and magazine do you think will print the release?”

Most authors believe the press release will result in phone calls from eager journalists and an onslaught of orders. Nothing could be further from the truth.

By itself, the press release lacks the power to skyrocket sales.

But combine it with other marketing tactics like a compelling email or phone pitch, and you can help journalists learn about your book and take the next step: schedule an interview with you or invite you to be a guest on their show or podcast.

To continue reading the entire blog post go to:

7 Myths of Using Press Releases to Promote Your Books

 

New Platform Connects Self-Published Authors With Readers – Written By Elaine Pofeldt

On the FORBES.com site Elaine Pofeldt writes an article about a new platform which connects self-published authors with readers. Thank you very much for this information Elaine!


It’s not easy to promote a book, and for self-published authors on a tight budget, it can be especially challenging.

Reedsy —a U.K.-based publishing startup that connects authors with editors, designers and marketers who can help them with their projects—has announced a new service to help them called Reedsy Discovery. Reedsy Discovery, which launched today, will let readers know about books its expert reviewers have recommended every week. Those who join are able to look through curated “bookshelves,” preview chapters and connect with other readers. Reedsy Discovery will also issue a weekly newsletter of top books in popular genres and books curated by trusted reviewers. It will also offer a leaderboard where readers can vote on their favorite titles.

“Most titles never get visibility,” says Reedsy CEO and Co-founder Emmanuel Nataf, who says the reasons often stem from a lack of knowledge of book promotion or reluctance to market their work. “We worked on a platform that will help authors find their target market,” he says.

To read the entire article go to:

New Platform Connects Self-Published Authors With Readers

My Blogging Strategy – Part 2 – Written By Don Massenzio

Don Massenzio provides us with his excellent blogging strategy. This is the second part of it. I think he does a phenomenal job. Thank you so much for sharing, Don!


This is a second installment in my series on my blogging strategy. As I relay the things that I’ve learned and that seem to work for me over the past five years that I’ve been blogging, it’s important to note that I’m not an expert and that my blogging process is a continuing series of trial and error.

My first post on this topic talked about how I’ve evolved my usage of blogging statistics over time. If you want to check it out, you can find it HERE.

In this post, I’m going to dig into my reading schedule and how I select posts from other bloggers to be shared.

Daily Review of Posts:

I currently follow 120 blogging sites. (118 if I remove my own two sites). This sounds like a lot but, as I review posts daily, not every site posts every day. This results in about 35-40 blogging sites that I check out every morning on Monday through Saturday.

To read the entire post go to:

My Blogging Strategy – Part 2