Choosing your Audiobook Voice – Written By Nicholas Rossis

I found this great post on how to pick our audio book voice on Nicholas Rossis blog. Thanks for sharing your experience, Nicholas. I’m convinced I’m not the only grateful writer!


As audiobooks are the fastest-growing segment in publishing, I have been researching that market. One thing I realized is that choosing a narrator is probably the most important decision you make when you turn your book into an Audiobook. People who love audiobooks may buy your audiobook because they like your work, your genre, your cover, or your price. When they actually start listening to your audiobook however, one of the most important factors to decide whether they’ll continue listening to the end, is the quality of the reading.

So, how do you choose the right voice? Leaving out the financial aspects (if you can afford to pay the narrator the fee he is asking for or if you choose a royalty scheme), there are a few issues to take into consideration, from “demographics” to acting performance. Here are a few tips.

Demographics

So. Man or Woman? Younger or Older?

These questions are mostly answered through the characteristics of your book. Obviously, if your book is written in the first person, you need to match the voice to your own narrator. If your narrator is a young woman, so should be your voice. If he is a middle-aged southern cop, you obviously need an older man, possibly with an accent (we will discuss accents in a moment).

The choice is less obvious if your book is not a first-person tale. In this case, there is no rule of thumb, but there are several issues you can take into consideration to form a preference.

Continue reading the blog post here:

Choosing your Audiobook Voice

2017: A Year Without Writing

Nicholas C. Rossis informs us about his year without writing. Thanks for this interesting post.

Nicholas C. Rossis

Snoopy | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book From snoopy.com. Copyright: United Media/United Feature Syndicate

In late 2016, I made an extraordinary decision: I would hit the writing pause button. Obviously, this was not an easy decision to reach. I made it for a number of reasons:

  • By working simultaneously on both writing and marketing, I felt I wasn’t doing justice to either. My sales were stagnating at a time when I needed them to take off.
  • I wanted to spend more time with the wee one and enjoy her nutty antics before I missed out on all her toddler silliness.
  • And after 4 consecutive years of non-stop writing, during which I published 16 titles, I was feeling burnt out. Even turning my ideas for short stories into fully fleshed-out stories felt like a chore. This was a new feeling–I had turned to writing as an escape from my day job–and one that scared me. A…

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Changing My Books’ Titles And Some News

Congratulations, Nicholas C. Rossis! Brilliant news are brilliant news! One day I’d like to be where you are now.

Nicholas C. Rossis

Some News First

Azure Fire Publishing | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksThere have been some interesting developments in my writing career, among which the fact I’m now Editor-in-chief for Azure Fire Publishing (AFP), a US-based non-profit promoting youth-friendly Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Even though the position only offers a nominal fee at the moment, it comes with a perk: AFP has offered to publish my Fantasy/Science Fiction books.

The organization has a large monthly advertising budget to promote its authors’ books, so, after much deliberation, I have decided to accept.

My Books’ Titles

Pearseus cover | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksPerhaps, then, this is the perfect opportunity to deal with something that’s been bugging me for a while now: my first books’ titles. I find myself no longer satisfied by “Rise of the Prince” and “The Power of Six,” as I think of them as weak titles compared to my later ones. And since AFP will soon handle these…

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