Embedding Your Fonts for Paperback Books

Jo Robinson from LitWorldInterviews posted a very useful articles on how to use different fonts for paperback books on Create Space. Thank you very much Jo!

Lit World Interviews

There are lots of fabulous fonts around these days for us to use in our paperback books, and I think that making them visually attractive as well as wonderful to read is a great idea. Using a plain font for most of the body text is best, but there is no reason not to create great looking chapter headings, or using old typewriter fonts to make letters or notes stand out in your stories. Some fonts are made by hobbyists and offered online free for use commercially so it’s always necessary to check that they are embedded in your manuscript when you load it up to CreateSpace or any other POD system.

embed-font
CreateSpace says,

“In order to print your book, our printing presses need information about how to properly render the fonts used in your file. Information about fonts is not always included in documents by default, and you may…

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How To Write A Great Book Review – Research by A.J. Alexander

Picture courtesy of: https://www.tes.com/lessons/IMa05aDDs32cog/digital-book-reviews
Picture courtesy of: https://www.tes.com/lessons/IMa05aDDs32cog/digital-book-reviews

 

Lately, I’ve been asked by a fellow writer if I read his book and would be prepared to write a review. Even though I know how much work, effort, and heart blood a writer invests into books, I know as well, a writer is honored by a review. I was told this numerous times already. I read truckloads full of books since my childhood and of course, couldn’t review all of them. (Let’s not talk about the school book reports). And I found, even if I didn’t like a book too much, it wouldn’t be nice to ‘rip it to shreds.’ It might not be a bad book – just not the right book to read for me.

I liked what I read this time, and I agreed to write a review. If I only knew how to do so. This needed some research.

I started and found hundreds of articles, books, blog posts and lists. Are they all different? No, more the opposite! They all seem to be similar, some more simple, some more detailed, some complicated and long, with little variations. So I picked what I needed from some of them.

 

  1. The purpose of a review

I find it very important to learn what exactly the purpose of what I’m writing is. What is a review for? One of the first articles, referring to “reviews” in general, more than book reviews, in particular, was written by Karol K, a freelance blogger, and writer. He writes:

  • to learn the pros and cons of a given product
  • to find out if the product is meant for them
  • to find out if the product is of high quality and easy to use
  • to find out about alternative solutions
  • to find out about other users’ experiences with the product
  • to ultimately learn if the product is worth buying.

With those needs in mind, let’s look at what you can do to craft a truly valuable review.

His entire article can be read on: http://www.problogger.net/how-to-write-a-must-read-product-review/

 

  1. Writing Amazon reviews

Neal Wooten, author, writer, blogger, and comedian published an article on the Huffington Post Website, using six tips to writing Amazon reviews and in my opinion did a great job. At least to me it seems valuable, especially considering the “start” use of the Amazon rating.

Additionally, he mentions something quite powerful: The responsibility that goes with writing a review. Let me give you a couple of examples I picked from his article:

What if a car manufacturer was to drop off a brand new car to a person’s home, completely at random, and explain they had 24 hours to drive the car? Afterward, they would take the car to another home at random and do the same thing, and repeat for three months. They only asked that the homeowners/drivers would write a review of the automobile. What do you think would happen?

I suspect most of the drivers would do exactly what they should. They would write intelligent and informative reviews about how it handled, how it drove, gas mileage, the comfort, the power, the sound system, etc.

But there would be some drivers who would abuse this privilege. It’s human nature. Some wouldn’t even drive the car. Some would complain about everything from the visors to the texture of the floor mats. Some would complain about the color of the free car they were provided. Some would get drunk, drive 100 mph, wreck the car, and then write a bad review.

And that sums up Amazon reader reviews. While most are very helpful, many are just people exercising their basic nature to be useless. So here are some tips.

Then his six tips follow. He gives simple, easy to understand and helpful advice. To read his tips, go to http://www.huffingtonpost.com/neal-wooten/tips-for-writing-amazon-r_b_6959118.html

 

  1. What do I write about in my review?

Fran Stewart, the author of the Biscuit McKee Mysteries, writes in her “Southern Writer’s Blog”: Questions to Spark Book Review Ideas 

Her idea is, to ask the reader questions which I can build my review on. Her questions refer to the characters, the settings and the plot.

This, I decide, might be a great start for my review.

To see all of Fran’s given questions, please go to http://southernwritersmagazine.blogspot.com/2015/05/questions-to-spark-book-review-ideas.html

 

  1. Am I scared to write a book review?

You BET! I’m a writer myself, of course, I one day would like to get positive reviews for the book. I want to honor the author, his ideas, his talent, his magic, his story, his efforts, his work and his masterpiece. I want to make others read the book I loved so much. I don’t want to spoil it for the other readers.

Rosie Amber wrote four quick ways to overcome your fear to write a book review. It helped me a lot. If you are suffering from the same fears, read it here: https://rosieamber.wordpress.com/2016/07/25/4-quick-ways-to-write-a-bookreview-and-overcome-your-fears-mondayblogs/

 

  1. Rules for book review writing

These are the ones that are more or less the same all across the internet. One of the blog posts I particularly enjoyed reading, is the one Tara Sparling published:

5 Book Review Rules Which Could Make Writers Hate You Less

I think, the post is very helpful – and a great read too!

 

Oh well, I figure now I’m armed with the basic knowledge of book reviews. Let’s see if I really can get a review that is as helpful as I want it to be to other potential readers!

 


 

CreateSpace – Final Things to Check

Jo Robinson of LitWorldInterview provides us with a useful and informative article about the final things to check on Createspace. Thank you, Jo!

Lit World Interviews

So you’ve finally got your page numbers right. Check that you’ve Justified your text for your CreateSpace book. I know that some authors choose not to justify text in their eBooks (not me), but a paper book really must be justified or it’s going to look messy. Choose your font and font size. You have lots of fonts that you can use in your paperback, but it’s a good idea to stick with something plain, other than for dropcaps or chapter headings.

Decide what trim size your book is going to be and set your manuscript’s size accordingly. From the Page Layout tab, click on the little arrow to the right of Page Setup, then select Paper from the three tabs at the top of the page setup box. Change the Width and Height settings to 6” x 9” or 5” x 8” or whatever size your book will be…

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Quick Tips for Paperback Page Numbering

Jo Robinson from LitWorldInterview once more provides us with excellent and helpful tips for self publishing. This time it’s the page numbering! Thank you Jo!! We are grateful for all your informative work!

Lit World Interviews

When numbering the pages of your paperback manuscript, the thing quite a lot of Indies have trouble with is that they use Page Breaks rather than Section Breaks. A Page Break is just that—starting a new page within the same section of a book. With a Section Break you can have totally different numbers and Headers and Footers for each section. The way to ensure that your numbering doesn’t bounce back from the first chapter of your book to the front matter is to get rid of all the Page Breaks in first pages and replace them with Section Breaks.

page-break
Section Break after title page, and again after the table of contents, and every other page you have in your front matter.

section-break
Then double click into your Headers and Footers up to and including the first page of your first chapter, and unlick Link to Previous. This will ensure that…

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Author Scams

This is an enormously helpful warning post by Aleta Kay with a link to a very interesting article on how to beware of author scams. Thanks for this find, Aleta!

 

 

Picture courtesy of: www.saxonfinance.co.uk
Picture courtesy of: http://www.saxonfinance.co.uk

The Encouragement Corner

Beware of Listopia, Indie Writers Support#Author Scams

There is no option for re-blog on this site, but Joan Stewart  of The Publicity Hound has weekly, sometimes daily advice for authors and business entrepreneurs. If you are an author and don’t want to end up getting caught in a publicity scam, please click on the link and read this article. Protect yourself from would-be promoters.

Please do your homework. Don’t get caught in the fish hooks these scammers create, pretending to be associated with Indie Books/Authors when they are not. Find out all you can before signing on with anyone.

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16 of Our Favorite Kindle-Publishing Resources for First-Time Authors

Silver Threading provides us with access to a post showing 15 kindle publishing resources for first time authors. Thank you Colleen.

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry

Check out this amazing information! ❤

Ready for your self-publishing journey? If you want to be successful on Amazon, check out these Kindle publishing resources.

Source: 16 of Our Favorite Kindle-Publishing Resources for First-Time Authors

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How to Make a PDF Cover for Your CreateSpace Book

I found this excellent step-by-step guide on how to create a PDF cover for CreateSpace. It has been written by Jo Robinson and I find it extremely helpful for first time self publishers.

Lit World Interviews

When you’re ready to have your book printed with CreateSpace and you’re planning on tackling the cover on your own it can seem rather daunting. It certainly terrified me to begin with and I only very recently updated my covers from the originals I made using the CreateSpace online cover creator. There’s nothing wrong with using that though. It depends on you entirely. Today I’ll show you how to make a PDF cover using their downloadable template. Once you’ve finished the interior of your book and have the final page count, go to the CreateSpace Template Generator and fill in all the required fields.

  • Click on screenshots to enlarge.

Build Template

Click on Build Template and it will download a zipped file containing two templates. One PDF and one PNG. Drag the PNG across to the folder that you’ve allocated for all the elements of your cover design.

BookCover6x9_BW_330.pngTemplate

For some reason these…

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Author Websites for beginners

Picture courtesy of: http://www.yourwriterplatform.com/author-website-elements/
Picture courtesy of: http://www.yourwriterplatform.com/author-website-elements/

March 29, 2013 Kimbereley Grabas published a blog post on “Your Writer Platform”, where she mentions “11 Author Website Must Haves”.

 

 

I personally think the article is enormously important and for beginners like me very useful in a way to use like a step-by-step manual.

 

 

She mentions her 11 most useful elements with detailed description which makes the article easy to read and follow:

 

 

1. Designing Your Author Website: Ensure a Good First Impression

2. About/Bio Page

3. Contact Information

4. Email Sign Up/Updates

5. Testimonials

6. Social Media

7. Books, Products and Services

8. A Blog

9. Appearances/Speaking Engagements/Latest News/Events

10. Press Page/Media Kit

11. Bonuses/Extras

 

If you need help with your Website, I figure it comes in handy. Enjoy the blog post, and I’m sure you will find it as helpful as I do.