The Benefits of Writing a Novel By Hand – Written By Bryn Donovan

Since I write my first drafts by hand for years, I found this article, written by Bryn Donovan, fascinating, and also very assuring that I apparently don’t do my things in a completely wrong way. Thank you, Bryn!


I love writing on paper. Few things spark joy in me like a brand-new spiral notebook—and that’s been true almost my whole life. Writing a novel longhand, at least for the first draft, is my personal preference. I don’t write the whole thing by hand before typing it: I transfer it to Word document on my computer now and then as I go.

Every writer is different, and I’m not going to claim that writing a novel by hand is right for everyone. I know that writing on paper isn’t even an option for everyone.

Besides, writing a novel longhand does have its disadvantages. It’s slower, since you’re going to wind up typing it on the computer later, anyway. And if you’re unable to decipher your own handwriting, which is true for lots of people, writing on paper for your first draft is pretty much a non-starter.

Here are a few benefits of writing a story longhand, though. If it’s doable for you and you haven’t tried it, you might want to give it a go, just to see if you like it!

 

CONTINUE READING HERE

200 Best Instagram Hashtags For Writers – Written By Bryn Donovan

On Bryn Donovan’s blog, I found a post about the 200 best Instagram hashtags for writers. Thank you very much, Bryn!


Hey there! Even though this list is called “best Instagram hashtags for writers,” the ones that are best for you will depend on who you are and what you write. The list will probably make you think of other writing hashtags, too.

I wanted to write this post because I’m always interested in the benefits of social media for writers. Besides, I’ve been using Instagram a lot more lately. I’m doing my one-post-a-day-for-a-year challenge—it’s one of my 101 Life Goals. (If you want to check out my Instagram, click here.)

 

Continue Reading Here

Master List for Describing Weather – Written By Bryn Donovan

I found an excellent blog post about describing the weather, written by Bryn Donovan. This is great! Thank you very much for sharing this, Bryn!


A lot of writers struggle with describing settings. I’ve written before about how to describe settings and why it matters, but a few people have told me they’d like me to do some of my master lists for writers to help them out!

I have a weird love for creating lists like this, so I’m happy to do it. “How to describe weather” seemed like a good place to start. This way, you won’t get stuck trying to figure out how to describe nice weather, or thinking up ways to describe rain. Hopefully, this will make your writing go faster.

I always include simple as well as more creative ways to describe or write about the weather. Sometimes, the simple word is the one you want! I included dryness and humidity in a few of the categories because it felt weird for them to get their own.

As always, this is not a comprehensive list, and I might add to it. My list will probably make you think of other possibilities, too. Bookmark or pin it for future writing reference!

Continue reading the full article here

 

How To Pitch Your Novel In Person To An Editor or Agent – Written By Bryn Donovan

I found a great post published by Bryn Donovan on her blog. To many writers her article provides valuable information on how to pitch in person. Thank you very much Bryn.


Hi friends! I’m writing this post at SleuthFest, a terrific writers’ conference for mystery and thriller writers. As an acquiring editor, I’ve spent hours here hearing novel pitches and chatting with writers. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I love talking with fiction writers about their projects, so I enjoyed it.

Writing conferences often set up agent and editor appointments so that writers can pitch their work in person. The goal is usually to have the agent or editor say, “Yes, send me the full manuscript,” Beyond that, it’s an opportunity to learn more about an editor and agent and to make a connection.

To read the entire article, click here:

How To Pitch Your Novel In Person To An Editor or Agent

 

5 Ways to Restart a Bad Day – Written By Bryn Donovan

Bryn Donovan gives us all ideas on how to handle a day that didn’t start too well. Thank you Bryn.


I’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately about how to restart a bad day. Because if you’re like me, sometimes you get a day that’s not going your way, and by lunchtime you’re thinking, “Ugh. Today is awful. Maybe tomorrow will be better.”

I know this is faulty thinking. Yes, a good night’s sleep can lead to a better frame of mind, and the dawn is a universal symbol for a fresh start.

But sometimes, I’m giving up on the present day too easily. A bad morning doesn’t mean the afternoon is a lost cause, and a bad day doesn’t mean I have to have a bad night.

I’ve done some thinking about how to make a bad day better…things that have helped me start the day over, even if morning is long past. Maybe some of these will help reboot your day, too.

To continue reading the article, please go to:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/08/20/5-ways-to-restart-a-bad-day/

50 Science Fiction Plot Ideas and Writing Prompts – Written By Bryn Donovan

Bryn Donovan provides us with 50 Science Fiction plot ideas and writing prompts. We never know when they come in handy, right? Thank you very much for your support, Bryn Donovan.


One of my most popular blog posts is my 50 Fantasy Plot Ideas and Writing Prompts, so I thought I’d share a companion post for writers of scifi and futuristic short stories and novels.

Some of these may be more along the lines of “speculative fiction” than science fiction. They include prompts about the environment, artificial intelligence, genetics, medicine, time travel, space exploration, alien races, and alternative histories. The real value of any science fiction premise or concept, of course, is the way the author uses it to explore questions about society, humanity, and relationships.

If you’re interested in publishing science fiction and you don’t have an agent, you might want to take a look at my roundup of fantasy and science fiction publishers who accept unsolicited (or unagented) manuscripts.

If you’re not writing scifi right now, but you might be in the future, you might want to pin or bookmark the post for future reference!

1. All citizens are temporarily neutered at birth. Would-be parents must prove to the government that they’ll be suitable caretakers and providers before they are allowed to procreate.

2. All marriages must be approved by a department of the government, which analyzes massive amounts of data to predict the success of the union, its economic and social impact on society, the health and welfare of any children, and so on. It’s such a hassle that many people opt for government-arranged marriages instead.

3. Global warming prompts rapid mutations in the human species.

 

To read all 50 ideas and prompts, go to:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/05/31/50-science-fiction-plot-ideas-and-writing-prompts/

 

 

Writers: Don’t Use Up Your Word Count on Internet Rants – written by Bryn Donovan

Recently a writer I know talked about not getting sucked into an online argument with a stranger, “because your girl doesn’t work for free.” I was nodding in agreement.

I cut way, way back on Internet arguments and rants a few years ago. I felt like the habit could make anger or bitterness my default setting, and I didn’t want that. I didn’t see a lot of minds being changed, anyway, so I doubted whether it was really worth it. Internet arguments seemed to yield a truly miserable return on investment.

But every week, millions of writers and other creative people are working for free.
They’re putting in hours of careful thought for online arguments and lectures.

In online communities, sometimes you’ll see a truly epic argument thread. (Once I witnessed one in a “private” Facebook group, and soon after, sections of it were printed verbatim in an article in a major magazine.)

In these threads, one person posts something, and another person disagrees. Before long, some people are posting walls of text that could pass for op ed columns, while others are posting snappy insults and collecting verbal high fives for their wit.

Dozens of people may be involved in the thread. If they were getting paid, it would represent hundreds of dollars’ worth of work.

To continue reading this post, please go to:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/02/27/writers-dont-use-up-your-word-count-on-internet-rants/#respond

 

Romance Publishers Who Accept Unsolicited Manuscripts – 2018 – written by Bryn Donovan

Lots of my readers want to know more about how to get published, so last week, I shared a list of fantasy and science fiction publishers who accept unagented submissions. This week, I’m doing the same thing with romance!

This isn’t a comprehensive list. Romance is a huge genre, and there are lots of opportunities out there for writers who don’t have agents.

I’ve left off some publishers because I just haven’t heard anything about them yet. I’ve also left off a few that specialize in certain types of erotic romance, because I have a lot of underage readers on this blog (although most of the publishers here do publish racy stuff as well.)

If there’s a publisher you believe should be added to the list, let me know via a private message at bryndonovan@bryndonovan.com.

The name of each publisher is a live link to their submission guidelines. Follow those exactly for the best results!

 

To read the full post click here:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/01/15/romance-publishers-who-accept-unsolicited-manuscripts-2018/

Fantasy and Science Fiction Publishers Who Accept Unsolicited Manuscripts – 2018 – written by Bryn Donovan

Hey there! I know many of my readers aspire to publishing a novel, and many of them write fantasy and science fiction, so I put this post together to help them. I did a post like this a couple of years back, but it needed updating!

Many publishing houses won’t accept submissions except through agents. If an author’s hoping for a big book deal, it probably makes sense to try to find an agent first. (And don’t submit to publishers while you’re looking for an agent. If someone is considering representing you, it’s going to be awkward to explain to them that four publishers have already turned you down.) Signing with a great agent can feel like winning the lottery, but even then, it can be a long road to the contract of your dreams.

But what if you haven’t been able to find an agent? Or you suspect what you’re writing is a little weirder or more niche than what agents are looking for, or if you’re just in a hurry?

Here’s a roundup of publishers who accept unsolicited manuscripts. Most of them are smaller houses, but a few are pretty big names. I’m including publishing houses that have open calls now and again, even if they’re not open to unagented submissions at the moment.

 

To read the full blog post, click here:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/01/08/fantasy-and-science-fiction-publishers-who-accept-unsolicited-manuscripts-2018/#respond

Why Some People Like to Read Sex-Free Romance – Written By Bryn Donovan

Bryn Donovan, writer, optimist and geek, provides us with a fantastic blog post about ‘Sex-Free-Romance’. Thank you so much, Bryn! I love it!

 

 

 


Most readers of my blog know that I write some steamy romance. A few of you even know that in the past year, I got a new job editing “sweet romance,” which is the industry term for romance with no sex at all.
I’ve always enjoyed all kinds of romantic stories and movies as a reader and a viewer, so I don’t find it strange at all to work on both. I’m even in the middle of writing a sweet romance right now.

However, I’ve always known that lots of people, particularly people who haven’t read a romance in twenty years, treat steamy romance writers with derision. They make jokes about the goofy euphemisms romance writers supposedly use for sex organs, although almost all romance writers have discarded these in favor of more direct language.

They also behave as though writers of sexy romance must all be bad writers. Most romance writers are women, and there is some sexism at work here: a discomfort with women authoring sexual content instead of being the object in it.

I’ve known all that for years. What I’ve learned in the past year, though, is that plenty of people also deride sex-free romance.

 

Read the entire article here:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2017/12/01/why-some-people-like-to-read-sex-free-romance/