Independence Day – 2017

I will not write a lot today. I’m just honoring the day, together with you, friends, family, and followers… thanks for your ongoing support!

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RAGGED OLD FLAG
by Johnny Cash

I walked through a county courthouse square,
On a park bench an old man was sitting there.
I said, “Your old courthouse is kinda run down.”
He said, “Naw, it’ll do for our little town.”
I said, “Your flagpole has leaned a little bit,
And that’s a Ragged Old Flag you got hanging on it.

He said, “Have a seat”, and I sat down.
“Is this the first time you’ve been to our little town?”
I said, “I think it is.” He said, “I don’t like to brag,
But we’re kinda proud of that Ragged Old Flag.”

“You see, we got a little hole in that flag there
When Washington took it across the Delaware.
And it got powder-burned the night Francis Scott Key
Sat watching it writing -Oh Say Can You See-.
And it got a bad rip in New Orleans
With Packingham and Jackson tuggin’ at its seams.”

“And it almost fell at the Alamo
Beside the Texas flag, but she waved on through.
She got cut with a sword at Chancellorsville
And she got cut again at Shiloh Hill.
There was Robert E. Lee, Beauregard, and Bragg,
And the south wind blew hard on that Ragged Old Flag.”

“On Flanders Field in World War I
She got a big hole from a Bertha gun.
She turned blood red in World War II
She hung limp and low by the time it was through.
She was in Korea and Vietnam.
She went where she was sent by her Uncle Sam.”

“She waved from our ships upon the briny foam,
And now they’ve about quit waving her back here at home.
In her own good land she’s been abused —
She’s been burned, dishonored, denied and refused.”

“And the government for which she stands
Is scandalized throughout the land.
And she’s getting threadbare and wearing thin,
But she’s in good shape for the shape she’s in.
‘Cause she’s been through the fire before
And I believe she can take a whole lot more.”

“So we raise her up every morning,
Take her down every night.
We don’t let her touch the ground
And we fold her up right.
On second thought I DO like to brag,
‘Cause I’m mighty proud of that Ragged Old Flag.”

(Source: http://www.inspirational-quotes-and-poems.net/independence-day-poems.html)

Picture courtesy of: http://www.imagesbuddy.com/

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The Pledge of Allegiance

I pledge allegiance to the Flag,
Of the United States of America
And to the Republic for which it stands,
One Nation, under God
Indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for All.

 

Picture courtesy of: Tumblr18.Com

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Blog Progress In Two Years

This year ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest’ celebrates its 2nd anniversary.

 

Picture courtesy of: http://www.pinterest.com

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Within these two years the post has made huge steps forward. I’m proud to present a few numbers here:

 

– 723 posts
– almost 3,900 comments
– 722 followers!
– over 30’000 views

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All these posts, all these comments, the interviews, the Spotlights, blog tours, pictures, smiles and all the fun! None of this would have been possible without you, followers, readers, visitors and friends.

I want to take the chance at this point to say THANK YOU! Thanks so much for your visits, for the time you sacrifice to read, to comment, to share, re-blog and smile with me and all of us! It’s you who made this journey such a pleasure for me!!

Picture courtesy of: http://www.google.com

Writer’s Treasure Chest – 2-year-Anniversary

What a wonderful surprise today!

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I’m quite proud of being a blogger for two years now.

In the meantime “Writer’s Treasure Chest” got:

over 680 posts

over 3’800 comments

678 followers

and

50 guests

I couldn’t have done it without so many people! My friends, readers, followers, commenters, re-bloggers, supporters, guest authors and many more.

I could not have accomplished such an awesome success without you all. You made this adventure a wonderful experience for me. You are all GREAT! Thanks for your ongoing support!

 

Happy Halloween 2016

What a wonderful Holiday for all of us! Thank you for your loyalty, thanks for regularly visiting my blog! You make blogging fun for me!

Since this is a Holiday celebrated mostly outside – please, think of taking your pets in, and by all means, protect your black kitties! There are some weird people out there!

And now, please celebrate – I wish you and your families:

 

 

 

Writer’s Treasure Chest 1st Anniversary

Yesterday I got an amazing surprise when I checked my comments. I earned a badge.

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It said:

Happy Anniversary with WordPress.com.

You registered on WordPress.com one year ago.

Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging!

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I’m quite proud of being a blogger for one entire year.

In the meantime “Writer’s Treasure Chest” got:

299 posts

1,675 comments

and

329 followers

But then: I couldn’t have done it without so many people! My friends, readers, followers, commenters, re-bloggers, supporters and many more.

I could not have accomplished such an awesome success without you all. You made this adventure a wonderful experience for me – and I hope I’ll be able to come back many times more!!

Picture courtesy of: www.google.com

Picture courtesy of: http://www.google.com

155th anniversary of the Pony Express

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Picture courtesy of: http://ponyexpress.org/history/

April 14 celebrates the 155th anniversary of the first mail being delivered by the Pony Express. According to the National Park Service, the first package arrived at midnight on April 14, 1860. It traveled across the Sierra Nevada Mountains from Missouri, through Placerville, California, and then on to Sacramento, down to San Francisco. There were 100 stations along the route with 400-500 horses and as many riders. It was founded by William B. Waddell, Alexander Majors and Williams H. Russell, on April 3, 1860. The Hartford Weekly Times wrote about the arrival of the first delivery saying “…citizens paraded the streets with bands of music, fireworks were set off….the best feeling was manifested by everybody.” The cost of the first delivery was $70,000 to the founders. That’s the equivalent of just over $2 million in 2015 money, thanks in part to the inflation caused by the Civil War. (article to find at: http://heavy.com/news/2015/04/155th-anniversary-of-the-pony-express-google-doodle/ )

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The “Pony Express National Museum” teaches us:

The Pony Express was founded by William H. Russell, William B. Waddell, and Alexander Majors. Plans for the Pony Express were spurred by the threat of the Civil War and the need for faster communication with the West. The Pony Express consisted of relays of men riding horses carrying saddlebags of mail across a 2000-mile trail. The service opened officially on April 3, 1860, when riders left simultaneously from St. Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California. The first westbound trip was made in 9 days and 23 hours and the eastbound journey in 11 days and 12 hours. The pony riders covered 250 miles in a 24-hour day.

Eventually, the Pony Express had more than 100 stations, 80 riders, and between 400 and 500 horses. The express route was extremely hazardous, but only one mail delivery was ever lost. The service lasted only 19 months until October 24, 1861, when the completion of the Pacific Telegraph line ended the need for its existence. Although California relied upon news from the Pony Express during the early days of the Civil War, the horse line was never a financial success, leading its founders to bankruptcy. However, the romantic drama surrounding the Pony Express has made it a part of the legend of the American West. (Find this information here: http://ponyexpress.org/history/ )

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Picture courtesy of: http://ponyexpress.org/history/

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According to EyeWitness to history.com the life of a pony express rider was very dangerous. “Speed of delivery was paramount. Any weight other than the mail the horse carried was kept to a minimum. Ads for riders called for: “Young, skinny, wiry fellows, not over 18. Must be expert riders. Willing to risk death daily. Orphans preferred.” A specialized, light-weight saddle was developed that had built-in pouches to carry the mail. Hazards abounded, including weather, terrain, hostile Indians and bandits. It typically took a week for mail to reach its destination at a cost of $5.00 per ½ ounce.”

Two very famous historical names can be found on the list of pony express riders:

Buffalo Bill Cody                                                                                                      James Wild Bill Hickock