The Legends Of Windemere – Charles Yallowitz – Physical Description Posts

Charles Yallowitz published two blog posts about the difficulties of physical descriptions on his ‘The Legends of Windemere’ blog. I decided both are worth sharing. And here they are. Thank you very much, Charles!


The Physical Description: A Necessary & Surprisingly Difficult Piece

I think we can take this for granted.  Physical descriptions come off a little like a ‘duh’ concept.  We need to know what our characters look like to some extent.  Otherwise, every reader gets their own visual with no similarities.  Not necessarily a bad thing until people begin fighting over it.  You also lose a dimension if you avoid it entirely.  Yes, we have a personality, actions, and words, but there can be a sense of lacking if we don’t have even a basic appearance.  This goes for places too, but we’re going to focus on characters for this week.  So, why is this?

Readers have these things called the five senses . . . Oh, that’s going too far back into the details.  We all know this.  We also know that an author should try very hard to hit as many of them as possible.  This is much easier…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Questions 3: How Do You Describe the Physical?

It’s been a week with a topic that was more difficult than I expected.  You would think doing a physical description is basic and easy.  It’s part of a foundation for a character and a story when your goal is to create an image in the reader’s head.  Everyone has their own opinion and strategy.  So, let’s not beat around the bush and end the week by opening the floor:

  1. How important is physical description to you as an author?
  2. What tip would you have for a new author struggling with this?
  3. What is the funniest thing you’ve done with a physical description?  (This can be accidental or on purpose. For me, it would be the switching eye color on Luke Callindor.)

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

A Brief Guide To A Fantasy Arsenal

Nicholas Rossis, ‘in cooperation’ with Charles E. Yallowitz provides us with this amazing list of weapons for fantasy writers. (Being a writer of paranormal romance I might profit too!). Thanks so much, Nicholas and Charles!

Nicholas C. Rossis

I hosted the other day a guest post by my author friend, Charles E. Yallowitz, but today I’m sharing his excellent series of posts he has written on fantasy (Medieval) arsenal. Charles has recently shared posts on the types of swords, shields, and projectile weapons used in fantasy (and inspired by real-life Medieval and ancient weapons). I hope he continues this series, as it’s a great resource for all of us fantasy writers (by the way, if you haven’t checked out his blog yet, you should do so for his great tips on writing rounded characters, his fun fantasy short stories and a lot more).

So, let’s start with that staple of fantasy…

Swords

Sword types | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksHere is what I’ve been able to find out about swords:

Two-handed swords

  • the European longsword, popular in the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance.
  • the Scottish late medieval claymore (not to be…

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