Top Publishers of 2016

The Write Nook

A few weeks ago, Publisher’s Weekly came out with a ranking of America’s top 20 publishing houses for 2016. It’s no surprise who the top 5 were, but what’s really important is what came after.

The sixth and seventh publisher were both that of children’s books- Scholastic and Disney came in right under the ‘Big Five.’ It’s quite a refreshing thing to see. Children’s literature has always been a tough genre to crack because the audience is smaller, the interests change rapidly, and the surge of technology has threatened to turn some children away from reading and the love of books. Nevertheless, books sales for 2016 has proved that there is still so much to love about children’s publishing. For Disney, Star Wars and Rick Riordan books led the way.

tops publishers

Houghton and Workman come in next, showing us that non-fiction titles still have a big impact on our consumption market as…

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My Writing Progress – 2

Picture courtesy of www.google.com

Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com

It’s been months and months ago that I have informed about my writing progress, in May, to be precise. Unfortunately, 2016 was not an enormously successful year for me, and so many unexpected things happened that have delayed my writing.

Readers who have subscribed to my monthly Newsletter had the chance to occasionally glimpse to my baby steps forward, but the steps were small, and I got frustrated.

I think sometime in October I promised myself by the end of 2016 I would finish typing, checking, correcting and editing the first book of my paranormal series on my computer and send it off to my editor.

 

And I kept the promise to myself!

 

I completed my task. The first novella of my series has been sent to my editor, together with the third one. Currently, I am working on the second part and more or less at the same time work on number four and five.

It is a pleasure to write them, and I wish it would not take that much time to finally present you the first book of the series. But in fact, there’s still a lot to do.

Thanks to my editor and the cover artist, who I will one day introduce you to, I am positive that their effort is a huge part of presenting you with a, at least neat story, sometime next year!

I’m so grateful to have them in my life – and I’m still very excited: I’m an author!

EDITING 101: 08 – Using Song Lyrics in your Manuscript…

Careful, Money-Trap!
I didn’t know using song lyrics in a manuscript would cost this much! Please read carefully if you have planned to mention lyrics of a song in your story!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Using Song Lyrics in your Manuscript

You’ve just written the most perfect restaurant love scene imaginable. As your two main characters unite on the dance floor, the haunting strains of “Unchained Melody” play in the background. The lovers gaze deeply into each other’s eyes as the song’s lyrics pass through their ears, melding their souls together in acoustical rapture:

Oh, my…”

Wait! Stop! Halt!! Turn off the radio, unplug the phonograph, and disconnect your online radio station! Are you crazy? Are you looking for a lawsuit?

<Author looks around incredulously>

Who, me? Now what does this woman want me to do? Eliminate the perfect words from this scene?”

Yep, that’s exactly what I want you to do. You’re not…

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My writing progress

BP_NB

Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com

 

From April 24 through May 6 I was spending time in California with a wonderful friend of mine. She is awesome, and I love her! Her backyard is like an ointment for my soul. Sitting there, hearing the soft lapping of the pool water calms me and gives my heart and soul all the relaxation it needs. Occasional squirrels make me smile, and my fantasy has the chance to unfold fully.
Within this paradise, I continued writing my pre-novel novella I had planned to finish.

 

The moment my pen touched the paper, it wrote, nearly by itself. The story took form, and the protagonists developed. Only a short while upon my return I completed the first draft.
Right now I am typing the novella into the computer and hope it will be completed soon; then I will start my first round of editing.
I’m very excited! I am an author.

 

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…Authors, the longest days…waiting for your editor’s feedback… Susan Toy tells it…

Susan Toy is a guest on Seumas Gallacher’s Blog and has published a fantastic post about “Idiot Author’s Guide to waiting for Editorial”.. Thank you, Susan Toy!Photo 4

 

 

Seumas Gallacher

…an Idiot Author’s Guide to waiting for Editorialcomment… from my terrific pal, Authoress, Susan Toy

10 Ways I pass the time while waiting for my editor to finish editing my novel …

by Susan M. Toy

 It took about 12 years to complete a final draft of my second novel, a draft I felt was finally ready to send to my most trusted first reader—my editor.

 You’d think after all the time the file has sat in four computers and various memory sticks during all those years, sometimes never seeing the light of day, I’d have embraced patience and would now be willing to allow for whatever further time was necessary to complete the editing process. After all, I know that it does take a great deal of time and concentration to complete the stellar and most thorough job my editor is currently doing.

 But…

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How Much Should You Spend On Self-Publishing Your Book?

Jen Owenby, Author, has provided us with an interesting infographic on how much we should/could spend on a self-published book. In particular for new authors this is so valuable! Thank you very much Jen!!

Jens Thoughts

how_-much_to_chargeI received an article with this information and wanted to share. Although I didn’t use Reedsy for editing and my book cover, I found I fell within most of the pricing ranges.

One thing I didn’t see on this infographic was the Q&A time with the editor. I certainly had questions as I moved through the process and the last thing I wanted was to be left hanging if my editor said, “this doesn’t work in the plot.” I’ve worked with previous editors who would make a comment and instead of being able to ask a few questions you had to make the changes, submit, and pay again. I’m not clear what Reedsy offers, but if you’re looking for an editor, it’s an important topic to ask about.

By Maryann Yin on May. 2, 2016 Reedsy Self-Publishing Infographic (GalleyCat)

Until Next Time…

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Writing a Query Letter #wwwblogs #writinganovel

Query letters. Am I the only one who is scared of them and really wants to do it RIGHT? Not only ‘right’ but ‘RIGHT’… I think this is such an important blog post who might give me more than a hint! Thank you Alison for sharing this!

Alison Williams Writing

query letter pic 3

While it’s true that the world of publishing is changing, and that many authors are happy to self-publish, some writers still wish to find an agent, and so will need to introduce themselves with a query letter.

What’s important

It’s absolutely vital to remember that this letter is the first example of your writing that an agent will see, so make it count. These are the key things to remember:

  • Address your letter to a specific agent – avoid Dear Sir/Madam.  Using a name shows that you’ve selected that agent – not just stuck a pin in ‘The Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook’
  • Make it clear you’ve done your homework – state why you’re approaching that particular agent (similar authors? Looking for your genre?)
  • Make your book sound interesting
  • State the genre and word length
  • Include any details of your writing history – competitions, publications, experience
  • Keep it formal, keep it…

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