Unforced Errors—5 Ways Writers Stand Between Themselves And Success – Written By Ruth Harris…

Ruth Harris published a guest post on Anne R. Allen’s blog about how writers stand between themselves and success. Thank you for your very educational blog post, Ruth.


on Anne R. Allen:

A term used in scoring tennis, “unforced errors” are not caused by the actions of the player’s opponent, but they’re the responsibility of the player him/herself. S/he is caught wrong-footed, out of balance, unable to return the serve, incapable of making the winning shot.

The concept of unforced errors can also be usefully applied to writers. Unforced errors are the self-inflicted harm we do to ourselves.

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What did Medieval People Really Wear? – Written By Nicholas Rossis

Nicholas Rossis provided us with a very interesting and highly educating blog post about medieval wardrobe – reality vs. Hollywood. Even though I called the article educating and interesting, which it is – I still think Nicholas just ruined my day. (Just kidding!)


Contrary to popular belief, people in the Middle Ages loved color – and could afford it. They also liked to be, well, naked. Which makes sense, considering how much Medieval people liked throwing rotten vegetables at each other.

Some people take the term “Dark Ages” a little too literally. There is a notion in popular culture that the Medieval Period was a time when everyone lived in absolute poverty, wore clothes that looked like they were sewn together by a 6-year-old, and bathed zero times during their entire lives. The dark-filtered movies and shows depicting the Medieval period are supposed to symbolically reflect how bleak everyone’s life was.

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Anna Mocikat – on Ari Meghlen’s Blog

Ari Meghlen has a great blog post published by her guest blogger Anna Mocikat from Poland. Thanks for sharing this interesting post, and introducing us to Anna, Ari!


Today I welcome author Anna Mocikat onto my blog, who is discusses just why you shouldn’t use Google Translator if you want to include any other language within your novel.

Big thanks to Anna for being today’s guest poster, please make sure to check out her links and details at the end of this post.

I still remember the day very well when the Google translator got introduced for the first time. Everybody was so excited! The press was celebrating it and enthusiastically cheering that soon professional translators would become obsolete.

Greedy publishers were rubbing their hands in anticipation, hoping they would soon save tons of money they otherwise have to spend on expensive, professional translators.

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Can You Sell Books On Amazon That Have No Words? – Written By Derek Haynes

Derek Haines teaches us about selling books on Amazon. Thanks so much for another one of your valuable lessons. I very much appreciate your educational posts, and I’m sure not the only one, Derek. Thank you!


Selling books on Amazon is a tough business

If you are a self-publishing author, it is easy to forget that Amazon sells a lot of products apart from books.

Listing your books for sale is only a tiny part of what Amazon sells. It sells everything from home-delivered groceries to complex security installations.

But can you imagine that there is a lucrative market for wordless books?

Well, in fact, a wordless picture book can earn far more than you are earning for your fiction book of 100,000 words.

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Trying to Make Your Story “Unique”? Beware of These Common Pitfalls – Written By Justin Attas

On the ‘Jane Friedman’ blog, Justin Attas wrote a guest post about three common pitfalls and how to avoid them. I find this an energetic, educational and interesting blog post which I thought I needed to share.


Today’s guest post is by novelist Justin Attas (@justinattas).


Writers always seek to produce a unique story, hoping readers will choose their book from the increasing pool of what’s available. But this can lead to creating a character or story that is “different” sheerly for the sake of, well, being different.

I’ve found three dangerous pitfalls for writers struggling to stand out:

  • “Strong” female characters
  • enemies-to-lovers storylines
  • Leading characters who are damaging, not damaged

Luckily for anyone struggling with one of these tempting story blackholes, there are ways out of all three.

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3 Simple Tricks to Create a Character OH SO Different From YOU

Kristen Lamb, experienced author and blogger, has published a new blog post I find very educating for new authors (which includes me of course). I’m always getting the best advice on Kristen Lamb’s blog and appreciate her support, experience and wisdom. Thank you Kristen!

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Characters

As some of you know I am still recovering from the flu. Also, the holiday season gets more than a little insane so it is always a joy to run across fresh talent to share with all of you. The bad news is that Alex Limberg lives in Vienna so taking him as a hostage? Can you tweet #logisticalnightmare? Good news is, apparently Austrians work for compliments and candy cigarettes #littleknownfact.

So, with my Amazon Prime Account, I was able to secure SWEET blog content and all of us could avoid any sticky international incidents with the Austrians.

Which is best for all because, well who doesn’t dig their pastries?

This is another guest post by copywriter Alex Limberg. To mix things up a bit, Alex is assisting me through the holiday season until he makes his New Year’s resolution to kick his candy cigarette habit *rolls eyes*.

…and then we’ll…

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34 Writing Terms For Serious Writers

Cathleen Townsend provided us with an excellent educating article about writing terms for serious writers, which I think is definitely worth to share. Thank you, Cathleen.

Cathleen Townsend

dictionary2Part of being a writer is expanding your knowledge of our craft. A better vocabulary about the technical aspects of writing can help you to become a more proficient wordsmith. It’s very difficult to speak intelligently about something if you lack the proper words.

I found these definitions via a tweet from Jenn Flynn-Shon (@jennshon), and I thought I’d share the best of them with you.

It’s well worth checking out the original article for the full list, especially since they’ve got more useful writing posts in their menu.

https://www.butte.edu/departments/cas/tipsheets/style_purpose_strategy/definitions.html

Alliteration: The repetition of the same sound in successive words, usually, but not necessarily, at the beginning of words: Blown buds of barren flowers

Apostrophe: A figure of speech in which the absent is addressed as if present, the dead as if alive, or the inanimate and abstract as if animate and concrete: Come, Sleep; O Sleep!

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Making Story MAGIC—How To Bring the Elements All Together

Becca Puglisi , speaker, writing coach and bestselling author published a post on Kristen Lamb’s blog about how making a story magic by bringing all elements together. In my opinion it’s an excellent educational blog post worth sharing with as many people possible.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Original image via Flickr Creative Commons courtesy of Sodanie Chea Original image via Flickr Creative Commons courtesy of Sodanie Chea

I love to think of myself as having a special eye for talent, and when I find gems like Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi, it just makes a gal go “SQUEEEE!” I’ve been following these ladies for a loooong time since they were relatively new in their careers.

These days?

Back up because they are a powerhouse and they offer up some of the most excellent writing instruction in the business. They are the authors of the legendary Emotion Thesaurus which eventually gave rise to stacks of other writing tools (I recommend and use them ALL) and now they are launching something truly special.

And, since they are rockstars, they have given me, the W.A.N.A. Mama a very cool deal to share with you guys at the end of this post. This is HUGE! This is the new state-of…

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