March/April 2017 Writing Contests

Thank you so much Rachel Poli for the March & April 2017 Writing Contests.

Rachel Poli

march-april-2017-writing-contestsMarch 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: Food
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: March 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $10 for up 6 poems or $15 for up to 12 poems
Prize: First place – $500

Genre: Fiction and Nonfiction
Theme: None
Website: Narrative Magazine
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $25
Prize: First place – $2,500

Genre: Fiction
Theme: None
Website: Colorado Review
Deadline: March 14, 2017
Entry Fee: $15 – snail mail, $17 – online submission
Prize: First – $2,000

Genre: Fiction
Theme: None
Website: Fabula Press
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $10
Prize: First – $250

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: My Kind of America
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Step Outside Your Comfort Zone
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

April 2017

Genre: Fiction or poetry
Theme: None
Website:

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6 Signs of Scam Publishers

Steven Capps gives us excellent advice on what to look for if we want to find out about whether our publisher is a scam. Thank you Steven. We appreciate your efforts!

Steven Capps

As a warning, I am writing the rough draft of this post on my IPhone while I do cardio at the gym (cue gym selfie below). I am trying to be more efficient and thought that this would be a good time to get in some writing.

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Earlier today, I was browsing Facebook and amid the swath of political drivel, I found an advertisement for a publisher looking for authors. Several red flags flickered almost immediately. Though this post is inspired by an actual publisher, I am going to omit their name because when I reached out to them, they deleted the content. It seemed like they were more of a naive kid rather than a malicious con-artist. Regardless, here are 6 Red Flags to be aware of when looking into a publisher.

Red Flags of Scam Publishers

1. Poor Marketing Design

It doesn’t take an award winning artist to…

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Me and my book blurb

 

Picture courtesy of: https://pixabay.com/de/schreibmaschine-antik-alt-schreiben-585000/

Picture courtesy of: https://pixabay.com/


As a beginner, I tried to get to know more about book blurbs since I needed to write my own. To make sure it will be appropriate and professional, I did some research, asked some experienced writers and found an amazing article, written by Author Traci Sanders, “Taking the fear out of book blurbs,” which I had re-published on my blog End of June 2016.

Out of fear to give out too much information, I wrote it apparently too vague, and it wasn’t intriguing enough. I asked several more writers and got interesting information and an enormous help. One of them, Author Jim Spencer, asked me to send him a quick synopsis, and he then took the time and wrote an entire blurb on my novella, showing me how he would do it. I will be forever grateful for the time and efforts he sacrificed to my helpless self!

In the end, it was me who was not entirely happy with it. Until a fellow blogger and cover designer, Chris, The Story Reading Ape, supported me with his opinion as a reader.

Who would have thought to ask a reader, instead of a writer?

The way this all happened, of course, prompted me to consider the question, whether I, as a reader, am already “too much” thinking like a writer who has to sell the book? Instead of writing what would have intrigued me, as a reader, did I just try to imagine how “the general reader” would like it?

Is the future marketing of the book already clouding my vision?

It seems there are three different ways of thinking a writer has to adopt:

  1. Thinking as a writer
  2. Thinking as a reader
  3. Thinking as a marketing specialist

These three ways apparently can be combined but should at times be separated either, accustomed to the respective situation.

Apparently, I have not yet been able to do so and at this moment it worries me.

Wouldn’t the difficulty be to know when to switch thinking? There are many helpful resources online to cover this topic. But searching for them will need me some more efforts once again.

I would say, there’s so much to learn and so little time…

 

Registered Copyright or Not?

This is an informative, interesting and very important blog post for not only new, but all writers. Thank you so much for sharing Claire!

Plaisted Publishing

The Why’s and Why Not’s of Copyright.

I’ve been surprised by the differences of copyright offered in the countries an Author resides in, along side how long it can take to get Registered Copyright, especially in the USA.  So what is all the fuss about, why do some authors go for registered and other, like myself, don’t bother.

Well the answer to why I don’t bother with registered copyright is because it isn’t an option here in New Zealand.  According to research I’ve done we only have what some authors call ‘The Poor Man’s Copyright.’  So are we in New Zealand as protected by International Law as others.  Yes we are.  So why is registered copyright so important in the USA?  Why is it so slow?  

In the UK they do registered copyright online.  I have yet to establish if anyone world wide can apply, or if…

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How to Name Your Characters

This is such an amazing blog post on how to name your characters. This is great. Thank you so much. Rachel!

Rachel Poli

Naming Your Characters: First Names

Your name is part of what makes you you. That’s no different from the characters in your story.

Some people say that names aren’t important. It’s the description and development throughout the story that creates loveable, relateable characters.

I think names are pretty important as well. Plus, they’re a lot of fun.

There are two ways I come up with names for my characters:

1. I check the meanings behind them.

I love to look up various names and check their meanings. It makes the character feel more one with the story, if that makes any sense.

I think it shows that you put thought into the name of your character. It shows that your character is important to the plot somehow. It’s like the Story Gods have chosen that name for your character because they have a big destiny to fulfill–which is your plot.

For example, in the…

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February/March 2016 Writing Contests

Thank you so much for all your efforts, Rachel Poli! We appreciate you’re providing us with all these contests! You’re great!

Rachel Poli

February March 2016 Writing ContestsFebruary 2016

Type: Poetry and/or Short Story
Hosted by: Westmoreland
Deadline: February 16, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Flash Fiction
Hosted By: Fish Publishing
Deadline: February 28, 2016
Entry Fee: $14

Type: Short Story (new writers only)
Hosted By: Glimmer Train
Deadline: February 29, 2016
Entry Fee: $18

Type: Flash Fiction
Hosted By: Women On Writing
Deadline: February 29, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

March 2016

Type: Short Fiction
Hosted by: Hunger Mountain
Deadline: March 1,2016
Entry Fee: $20

Type: Creative Nonfiction
Hosted by: Hunger Mountain
Deadline: March 1, 2016
Entry Fee: $20

Type: Poetry
Hosted by: Hunger Mountain
Deadline: March 1, 2016
Entry Fee: $20

Type: Children’s, middle grade, or young adult
Hosted by: Hunger Mountain
Deadline: March 1, 2016
Entry Fee: $20

Type: Short story/flash fiction
Hosted by: Grammar Ghoul Press
Deadline: March 13, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Poetry about Food
Hosted by: Literal Latte
Deadline: March 15…

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