Adding An Alien To The Story

From a very young age, I have been fascinated by owls. I love owls, as do many other people I meet. According to psychologists, these birds are sympathetic to us for having an ‘almost human face.’ Let’s see if they’re right:

Both pics were courtesy of http://www.google.com

And this isn’t a hint that Johnny Depp looks like an owl. I just picked someone most of us know. Two eyes, a nose, and a mustache. Compared to other birds owls have both eyes on the front of their head instead of the side. But this isn’t the subject of this blog post.

As I said, I’m fascinated by owls. There are many mysterious facts about them:

  • An owls’ eyes are immobile; they cannot ‘roll their eyes’ or move the eyeballs. They can focus on pray. But then, they can turn their heads about 270 degrees.
  • Their ears are asymmetric; one ear sits higher on the head than the other. Since they have excellent hearing, this way they can hear sound in different dimensions.
  • Lager owls eat small ones. And an owl can eat up to 1,000 mice a year. They swallow them entirely: tail, fur, feet – everything. Later they choke up what their body can’t digest. Occasionally these pellets can be found on the ground in the woods.
  • The smallest owl on Earth is the Elf Owl, which is 5 – 6 inches tall and weighs about 1 ½ ounces. The largest North American owl, in appearance, is the Great Gray Owl, which is up to 32 inches tall.
  • Superstitious people in certain parts of the world still believe owls are death omens. In wide parts of Europe owls have been killed by the hundreds because, in particular, farmers believed, owls are a bad sign of destruction. Until in the early 70’s these stupid people nailed owls to their sheds with their wings spread and left them to hang to die and believed this way they could protect their crop, animals, and house from disaster, accident and natural force.
  • For a very long time, owls have been a symbol of scholarliness and wisdom. It seems the origin of this habit goes back to the Ancient Greeks: In Greek mythology, a little owl (Athene noctua) traditionally represents or accompanies Athena, the virgin goddess of wisdom, or Minerva, her syncretic incarnation in Roman mythology.[1] Because of such association, the bird — often referred to as the “owl of Athena” or the “owl of Minerva” — has been used as a symbol of knowledge, wisdom, perspicacity and erudition throughout the Western world.[2][3] (Source Wikipedia)

To me, they have a trace of magic about them.

The series of books I am currently writing is classified between paranormal romance and fantasy, and there is some magic involved. For a while now I have considered adding an owl to one of the stories. But I cannot place it.

No matter how much I think and try, no matter how fascinated I am by owls, that particular owl has no room in these books. It would feel like an alien within those stories. I even considered to build a story around the owl to add it, but it doesn’t make sense at all. It seems owls are not foreseen to be in this book series.

I then thought I might write another story about an owl. But I admit, I didn’t see a plot that does not make a children’s book. At this point, I never considered writing a children’s book. So, what am I doing with my owl?

Does anyone have an idea? And did anyone of you authors out there have an idea for a character and found out that it doesn’t fit into the book you’re writing? What did you do? How did it make you feel? I’d be happy to read from you in my comments.

picture courtesy of http://www.google.com

 

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Author Spotlight Ari Meghlen

Welcome!

1. When did you start writing?

Firstly, thank you so much for having me on your blog.

I’ve been writing since I was given unsupervised access to pens. 🙂 I believe it was around the age of 8 years old. I loved making up stories and a teacher gave us an assignment to describe a friendly monster under the bed. I wrote not only a description but a story about him. And I haven’t stopped writing since 🙂

2. What motivates you to write?

I don’t really need motivation to write. It’s just what I was born to do. I am forever caught by scenes, character or plots that just fill my head until I need to get them down. It’s like writing relieves pressure in my mind and gives space to all the new ideas slipping in.

3. What genre do you write in and what made you chose this particular genre?

I write Preternatural Urban Fantasy, more traditional Fantasy though I’ve also written sci-fi and some crime as well as Police Procedural stories. I have always been drawn to fantasy and sci-fi. It’s what I love to read and watch as movies. But I never like being tied to just one genre. Mainly because the ideas I get stretch over multiple genres.

4. What is your goal in writing? Do you have dreams where your writing should take you?

My dream is to write full-time. I don’t care for great success or wealth (the latter would be nice if it happened). I just want to do what I love full-time.

I would love to see my work published, but I have no interest in rushing that just to see something I wrote in print. I have a specific level I want to get my writing to before I publish.

I want someone to read my stories and escape within my worlds, to connect with my characters and the ultimate… would be for someone to love my characters the way I love my favourite author’s characters.

5. Do you ever suffer from writer’s block and if yes, how do you deal with it?

I call it Creative Constipation and yes, I’ve suffered badly. I will often take a step back from writing as it can come on due to burn-out. I will watch movies in the same genre I am currently writing and when I’m ready to go back, I will do writing exercises.

This usually involves trawling the internet for random photos or pictures and then writing about them. It can be something as simple as just literally writing out exactly what I see in the photo, to describing a mood, coming up with what happens next etc. I think of it like greasing the wheels in my head.

6. What advice would you like to give new, hopeful authors?

Advice? Let’s see:

1 – Never refer to yourself as “aspiring”. If you write, you’re a writer. Own it.

2 – Writing is hard but that’s okay. It’s awesome and worth it, but don’t think it’s a cake-walk because it’s not.

3 – Never stop writing – there will be a lot of people who want to tear you down. This can even include friends and family. If you want to write, then let nothing stop you.

4 – Work at it. Writing gets better with practice. Don’t just write something fast and publish. There is already too much rough, unedited, barely-polished stuff out there. Take pride in your work and make it the best it can be. Better that it takes time and be great, than you rush and it be lacking.

5 – Learn to take criticism. It’s hard and we all hate it. But suck it up, Buttercup it’s part of the process. Learn to distinguish between good, solid critiquing and random, unhelpful criticism. Don’t lash out when someone offers feedback. Take a breath, step back and see what they say. They might just help your story grow. And remember, in the end, you’re the writer – you don’t have to use the feedback if you really don’t want to.

6 – Lastly, understand that if you want to be a writer and sell your work, that there is a business side to it. So, start early and learn about things like networking, marketing, branding etc. The more you learn the better position you will be in.

7. Please, tell us about your work.

My Preternatural Urban Fantasy is in it’s 2nd draft and with my Alpha Reader at the moment.

I am currently working on a new, more traditional fantasy set in a world called Ly’rium. The first book focuses mostly on Thea, one of the long-living Imorie. Having been kept hidden in her family estate for years, she is finally reaching the age where she can take control of her own life.

However, that freedom is suddenly snatched away when she marked as a Potential. Now Thea is forced to fulfil a gruelling, mentally and physically-challenging trial to test her inner power. If she passes, she will become one of the Blessed. If not, her mind will broken in the maelstrom leaving her a shell of herself.

Thank you for being my guest. It was such a pleasure to have you here!!


Connect with Ari:

Website – https://arimeghlen.co.uk/
Facebook Author Page – https://www.facebook.com/writerarimeghlen/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/AriMeghlen
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/ari_meghlen/

Information Overload – Guest Post by, Aurora J. Alexander…

Today my guest post on The Story Reading Ape’s blog was published. Thanks so much, my Furry Friend, for giving me this chance!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

When I discover a beautiful picture, I very often catch myself standing there, sunken into the sight and just enjoying. And then, I realize, very slowly, that I picture some of my characters interacting right at this wonderful place.

In book 6 of my series, I have some of my characters meeting in a clearing which I had kept in my memory like a valuable treasure, only to remember it the moment I needed it and used it for this particular story. And there’s not much I can do than to describe what I see in front of my inner eye. I figure this is one of the things I love about reading: releasing my fantasy. If I read about scenery the writer describes, I picture it in front of me and try to look at it the way it feels comfortable and decent for me. Don’t give me too…

View original post 431 more words

Author Spotlight Rebecca Tran

Welcome!

Please introduce yourself.
I am a hybrid author, blogger and book reviewer with three award-winning novels. I am also a wife, mother, and pharmacist. I have two little girls and a Boston Terrier. I love reading, writing, sewing, and collecting teapots.

1. When did you start writing?
I started writing when I was 16 years old, but I didn’t have the courage to publish until I was 37.

2. What motivates you to write?
I originally started writing as a form of self prescribed therapy after my dad died. Then it became stress relief after a hard day. Now my main characters tell me when and what to write.

3. What genre do you write in and what made you chose this particular genre?
I primarily write fantasy and romance but also have a sci-fi novel as well. I prefer fantasy and romance over other genres because its what I love to read. Some of my favorite books are epic fantasies with romantic themes.

4. What is your goal in writing? Do you have dreams where your writing should take you?
I want to entertain readers with the books I write. I hope they love my books as much as any big five author. My dreams are the same as a lot of authors. I would love a movie deal or to be a NY Times Bestselling author. My more realistic goal is to sell my books consistently and gain a consistent fan base. If I can please my fans I’ll consider myself a success.

5. Do you ever suffer from writer’s block and if yes, how do you deal with it?
I do suffer from writer’s block occasionally. When I do I set the project aside and move on to another. Eventually I will come back to it but it may take a while to figure out how to get past the problem.

6. What advice would you like to give new, hopeful authors?
The best way to get better at writing is to just do it. Keep writing and keep reading. Try new things and explore. Be sure to reach out to other authors for advice and network for cross promotion. The indie community is an amazing resource.

7. Please, tell us about your work.
I have one epic fantasy series titled The Chronicles of the Coranydas. The Rashade’ and A Guardian Falls are books one and two in the series. Descendants Rising, the third book in the series is due out late February to early March. For Their Sins is a paranormal romance/action adventure about a 300 year old vampire. Unlike the Rest is a free short story that is a companion to For Their Sins. My paranormal romance Dragons of the North is a box set featuring four shifter novellas. Finally my only sci-fi novel is Neutral Space, a futuristic tale of war, conspiracy, and love.

Thank you for being my guest. It was such a pleasure to have you here!!


Contact Rebecca: 

Website: http://rtranbooks.net
Blog: http://asmallgangofauthors.blogspot.com
Facebook page: https://m.facebook.com/Rtranbooks/
https://m.facebook.com/AGaurdianFalls/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/rtranbooks/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rtranbooks/
email: rtranbooks.com@outlook.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16335980.R_Tran
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rebecca-hoelker-tran-3aaab3141
Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/105043491920055628616
Independent Author Network: http://www.independentauthornetwork.com/r-tran.html


Rebecca’s books:

http://mybook.to/AGFalls

https://books2read.com/u/bOadr9

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://mybook.to/DragonPNR

https://books2read.com/u/mgr69q

 

 

 

 

http://mybook.to/nspace

https://books2read.com/u/m2oaLO

 

 

 

 

 

http://getbook.at/Rashade

https://books2read.com/u/bapZeL

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://mybook.to/FTSins

https://books2read.com/u/3yZeA6

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.instafreebie.com/free/1HZES

Writer’s Treasure Chest’s New Look

It’s been year’s end. The stress of Christmas was over, and for a few days I got time to breathe and relax – or so I thought. Until I was informed that my wonderful blog theme has been retired and was recommended to pick a new blog theme and update ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest.’

Since I prefer my ‘theme’ not only on my blog but also on my different social media accounts as well as on my Website I worked like crazy on updating nearly every single one of my accounts.

I was a bit sad to see my ‘pink balloons’ gone.

That meant I had to think of something else. A few days ago I decided to go into the new year with this beautiful fantasy book picture. It took me hours to find what I was looking for, and since I’m a woman, another few hours to pick one of the prepared pictures. I love this one because it expresses so much the degree of fantasy my stories take.

Maybe one day I might find something else for me, but right now, ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest’ has a new look.

I hope you’ll like it as much as I do.

7 Tips to Ending a Series: Buy Stock in Tissues

Charles Yallowitz provides us with 7 tips to ending a series which to me is an extremely important and interesting post to read since I am currently writing on a series. Thank you very much Charles

Legends of Windemere

Looney Tunes

It isn’t easy coming to the end, which is something I’ve certainly been saying since I finished writing Legends of Windemere: Warlord of the Forgotten Age.  So, let’s go over some tips for those that are coming up on the same milestone.  Warning:  There is no promise of tips working because every journey is different.  If there are any failures, we will assign you the proper scapegoat for free.

  1. Actually have an ending.  I know it sounds strange, but there series out there with nothing.  The whole thing simply ends with no real conclusion as if the author simply feel asleep on a comfy pillow.  You might think it’s done, but everyone else is waiting for the other shoe to drop.  Even if it isn’t a final battle, at least show the hero realizing they left a wild boar in the crock pot and should probably see…

View original post 520 more words

Trying To Write In Another Genre

A good friend of mine reminded me of something that happened a while ago.

He told me that life had given him some challenges currently and sometimes his head is full of thoughts about how to accomplish his tasks. At the moment he does have difficulties to write. He sits down, waiting for creativity to kick in and nothing happens.

Is this writer’s block? I don’t know, and since I’m not a too experienced writer, I would never presume to ‘diagnose’ such an excellent and gifted writer as he is. Much smarter heads and experienced writers have dealt with writer’s block before. I even published a post about it in February 2015 “Kiss Your Muse Hello.”

But what he said reminded me of something that happened a while back and made me laugh. And yes, I told him about it.

A while back when I realized my fantasy ran dry, I tried to tickle it by writing something I normally do not write.

As many of you know, I’m a writer of Paranormal Romance and Fantasy. But at this moment I decided, I would try to write a hot, steamy, and romantic, erotic scene. Occasionally I do read a sexy novel, and I was curious how I would do.

When I had finished the scene, I was quite proud of myself. I found it turned out to describe what I just saw going on in my head.

 

Picture courtesy of: http://www.pinterest.com

 

I set the few pages aside and went on to ‘daily business,’ whatever that was at this time.
I have to mention here: my idea did work. Writing in this unknown genre, in fact, awakened my ideas and fantasy, and I was able to continue with my new story.

I had nearly forgotten about my short trip into the erotic genre until I one day got the few papers in my hand while searching for some documents.

Sitting down and leaning back I re-read them…

… and started laughing so hard, I nearly choked. I screamed and howled with laughter. Earlier in this post, I said, after writing it, I was proud, I had considered I exactly described as the scene was in my head, right?

Re-reading these pages now showed me that I was completely wrong.

In my head, the scenery and what happened was perfect, yes. Including the smells, the sounds, the whispers… but on the paper, the entire erotic, sexy, steamy scene was about as erotic as the mating of gummy bears.

 

Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com

 

I figured, and I still do, that there must be a reason, why I picked ‘Paranormal Romance’ and ‘Fantasy’ my genres. Apparently ‘steamy hot’ is not for me to describe. I deeply admire every writer who can do it.

Now there are two questions at this point: Are the current stories I write that far off from my imagination as well? This would suck; even though my editor said no (which calms me a little bit).

And the second question: Have you ever tried to write in another genre, and how did this work for you? Thanks for sharing your experiences.