Fun with Google Translate – Written By Chris McMullen

Chris McMullen wrote a hilarious post about an experiment with ‘Google translate’. I had a good laugh with that one, Chris. Well done!


FUN WITH GOOGLE TRANSLATE

Google Translate is actually pretty handy as an informal tool.

There have been times where I have wanted to have at least a partial understanding of something that I read in another language online, and Google Translate has helped me with that.

I’m also a little rusty with French, and Google Translate has helped to fill in some of my gaps.

But if you wrote something and wanted to have a professional translation of your writing into another language, well, as you will see in this article, that could result in some interesting consequences.

TRANSLATION EXPERIMENT

What I will do is type a variety of expressions in English.

I will copy and paste these expressions into Google Translate, and have them translated into a different language.

Then I will have them translated back into English.

(Isn’t this what everybody does when they feel like having some fun?)

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You need to double your Amazon security

Jean M. Cogdell provides us with valuable information, hints and tipps about amazon security. Thank you very much Jean.

Jean's Writing

You heard right.

Time to double security and protect your books on Amazon. 

Now, not only do I need to work on this year’s taxes, but looks as if I may need to work on my Amazon account.

What the hell? Hackers are now invading Amazon? You’ve got to be kidding me.

I feel as if I’m playing Wack-a-Mole trying to avoid hackers and stupid people. This is getting ridiculous. I change my passwords from time to time, but now I’ve got to do more to keep these crooked jerks out.

Thanks to Janice Hardy over at Fiction University for the warning.

Here’s what I learned today about Amazon Security…

  • Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) accounts are linked to my regular Amazon account.
  • Hackers attempt to break into customer Amazon accounts every single day.
  • If a Hacker gains access to my Amazon account they have access to my KDP.
  • A Hacker will…

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Pirated Books

Plaisted Publishing House published an enormously important blog post for authors concerning copyrights and pirated books!! If possible, spread word about this for as many authors as possible to read it!

Plaisted Publishing House

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Pirate Books – No not a children’s story sadly, like with music they are books stolen from the author.  We tend to know why – The reader is to poor (cough, choke cough) and can’t afford a cup of coffee let alone our books.  They should be free, after all the author only writes them so we can read them.  

Like another blog I read this morning, said, they seem to forget all those businesses we contract out to, those who make our book covers, book trailers, editing, formatting and all the other things need doing to give the book (you only wrote) a fair chance.

I heard about a program called Blastythe other week.  Apparently it find your priate books and you can blast them – whatever that means.  After much thought, I decided to try it, expecally after seeing more pirate sites and having recommendations from…

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About Reading Recommendations Reviewed

Susan M. Toy published a blog post about ‘How to support an Indie Author’, which I find very helpful, useful and admirable, to each one of us. Thank you Susan!

Reading Recommendations

I launched a new blog the other day that’s dedicated to publishing honest and positive reviews of books I’ve featured on this blog, Reading Recommendations. Today I created a page with information about the blog and how to get your reviews posted on it. Please read About Reading Recommendations Reviewed and send me your reviews for future consideration.

How to support ANY Author!!

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A.J. Alexander is spreading her wings

Picture courtesy of: http://newtopwallpapers.com/owl-p/
Picture courtesy of: http://newtopwallpapers.com/owl-p/

 

When I decided to step out into the world of social media I did research. I, as well got tips and tricks, checklists as also read as many “user manuals for beginners” as I could before even getting anything done.

 

In March I started “Writer’s Treasure Chest”. Since then I try to write, research and build as well as find as many helpful blog posts and articles for new authors as I can to share them. I grow with every step I take. This is a once in a lifetime experience and I try to consciously enjoy every single part of the journey. I am discovering a new world, the writer’s world.

 

As so many other newcomers I had not considered the social media work, marketing, sales-preparation and networking hiding behind being a writer. Being a published author will not take the pressure from me to spread word about my work as far and wide as possible. This will need time and great efforts and that’s why I need to spread my wings and fly.

 

It is difficult sometimes to read a list of recommendations, ask another expert or experienced author for more advice and then listen to exactly the opposite. Plus getting a 30 minute speech on why my “How to…”-list will never work.

 

Step by step I opened accounts on:

 

At this moment I work on my personal website. It does have its own domain and is a big piece of work. I want this website to turn out perfect. It will need a little more time and “juggling” with the elements, but I’m sure I’ll be there soon. It needs some fantasy to create a Website before being published. So many authors do have their books on the “My work” page.  But I guess I did well considering the circumstances. I’ll let you all judge in due time.

September 19, 2015 I finally created my Facebook Author page. Of course I used a list with advice. In case you decide to check out the page and give it a “like” I will be grateful. And of course I welcome any advice for changes you might have.

As for now, I took in another challenge: My first Newsletter! I’m excited to announce I will send it out Mid-October. Of course I would love to send it out to as many people as possible. If you’d like to receive my newsletter, I’d be delighted to see you subscribing to my email list:

Please, click the icon to subscribe.
Please, click the icon to subscribe.

I’d love to hear you felt the need to check out if I followed my own researches and did an acceptable “newcomer” newsletter.

Thank you for your subscription!

155th anniversary of the Pony Express

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Picture courtesy of: http://ponyexpress.org/history/

April 14 celebrates the 155th anniversary of the first mail being delivered by the Pony Express. According to the National Park Service, the first package arrived at midnight on April 14, 1860. It traveled across the Sierra Nevada Mountains from Missouri, through Placerville, California, and then on to Sacramento, down to San Francisco. There were 100 stations along the route with 400-500 horses and as many riders. It was founded by William B. Waddell, Alexander Majors and Williams H. Russell, on April 3, 1860. The Hartford Weekly Times wrote about the arrival of the first delivery saying “…citizens paraded the streets with bands of music, fireworks were set off….the best feeling was manifested by everybody.” The cost of the first delivery was $70,000 to the founders. That’s the equivalent of just over $2 million in 2015 money, thanks in part to the inflation caused by the Civil War. (article to find at: http://heavy.com/news/2015/04/155th-anniversary-of-the-pony-express-google-doodle/ )

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The “Pony Express National Museum” teaches us:

The Pony Express was founded by William H. Russell, William B. Waddell, and Alexander Majors. Plans for the Pony Express were spurred by the threat of the Civil War and the need for faster communication with the West. The Pony Express consisted of relays of men riding horses carrying saddlebags of mail across a 2000-mile trail. The service opened officially on April 3, 1860, when riders left simultaneously from St. Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California. The first westbound trip was made in 9 days and 23 hours and the eastbound journey in 11 days and 12 hours. The pony riders covered 250 miles in a 24-hour day.

Eventually, the Pony Express had more than 100 stations, 80 riders, and between 400 and 500 horses. The express route was extremely hazardous, but only one mail delivery was ever lost. The service lasted only 19 months until October 24, 1861, when the completion of the Pacific Telegraph line ended the need for its existence. Although California relied upon news from the Pony Express during the early days of the Civil War, the horse line was never a financial success, leading its founders to bankruptcy. However, the romantic drama surrounding the Pony Express has made it a part of the legend of the American West. (Find this information here: http://ponyexpress.org/history/ )

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Picture courtesy of: http://ponyexpress.org/history/

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According to EyeWitness to history.com the life of a pony express rider was very dangerous. “Speed of delivery was paramount. Any weight other than the mail the horse carried was kept to a minimum. Ads for riders called for: “Young, skinny, wiry fellows, not over 18. Must be expert riders. Willing to risk death daily. Orphans preferred.” A specialized, light-weight saddle was developed that had built-in pouches to carry the mail. Hazards abounded, including weather, terrain, hostile Indians and bandits. It typically took a week for mail to reach its destination at a cost of $5.00 per ½ ounce.”

Two very famous historical names can be found on the list of pony express riders:

Buffalo Bill Cody                                                                                                      James Wild Bill Hickock

Picture courtesy of: http://www.becomegunsmith.org/the-10-deadliest-wild-west-gunfighters/
Picture courtesy of: http://www.becomegunsmith.org/the-10-deadliest-wild-west-gunfighters/
Picture courtesy of: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_Bill
Picture courtesy of: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_Bill