Writing Is Easy And It Is Hard

Picture courtesy of: http://www.google.com

Neil Gaiman is right. Writing is easy – and it’s hard.

We writers have a story in our head, and we want it written. That’s what we love doing; the book is what we want to accomplish.

But there is so much more. The characters, the plot, the genre, the word count, the editing, the cover, the formatting, the copyright, the beta reading, the hope and the fears.

Many of us, I figure, have the same fears that I have: Is the story as good as I hope it will be? Could I have done better? What does the reader want? What do the readers say? How are the reviews going to be? Is the book the way I wanted it to be? Are my characters the way I imagined them? There are so many more questions my fear, right now, won’t release.

In many ways, our passion is easy: just a keyboard (or a piece of paper and a pen), and we’re on it. But still, it is hard work. Do we think about everything we learned? Is the story the way we had it in our head?

And the writing is only one part. The ones of us who planned to go the self-publishing way, our work only start started with the publishing date. The networking, the marketing, getting the word and the book out there.

I think I’m not the only one who would love to write, just write and write and write… but then, I want my stories to be read too. And when it comes to that, I need to get all this work done.

That’s the hard part for me. (Apart of all fears and nightmares, of course).

So, yes. Neil Gaiman is right. Writing is easy – and it’s hard.


Picture courtesy of: Wikipedia.com

Neil Richard MacKinnon Gaiman, (born Neil Richard Gaiman 10 November 1960) is an English author of short fiction, novels, comic books, graphic novels, audio theatre, and films.

His notable works include the comic book series The Sandman and novels Stardust, American Gods, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. He has won numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards, as well as the Newbery and Carnegie medals.

He is the first author to win both the Newbery and the Carnegie medals for the same work, The Graveyard Book (2008). In 2013, The Ocean at the End of the Lane was voted Book of the Year in the British National Book Awards. (Source: Wikipedia)

How To Deal With Impatience When It Comes To Writing?

For years already I know that ‘patience’ and myself aren’t on friendly terms. If I want something, I want it now; not sometime in the future, but right now, as in ‘this instant.’ So, me being a writer hasn’t changed me significantly. Sometimes I want too much, too early. The process of writing (or typing into the computer) cannot be accelerated. It still means, to write one letter after the next, one word after the next, one paragraph and then chapter after the next one. I understood that pretty quickly, and that’s not mainly what bugs me.

But being a writer, even deciding to self-publish, means to call on other people’s services. We’re talking about cover designers (even though, mine is faster than lighting!!), editors (and mine is an angel and works with all her heart to make this book look good!!), copyright lawyers, author support service people and so on… Each one of them works with all their knowledge and ability, with all their heart and soul to make my first book a success.

But to me, all I can think of is there are so many people involved in my book – and there’s so much work ahead of me that still needs to be done, that every single delay, like financial straits, is driving me up the walls.

I want to see this book published – and not around Christmas – but now. Now as in ‘tomorrow.’
But: of course, to the same time, I want my book to be perfect. I don’t want anything hasty and sloppy, just because I’m swinging a whip. I want all my supporters and helpers to work at their own pace because I know, they’re excellent in what they’re doing! I’m not impatient with them – I’m impatient with myself, wanting too much too fast – and knowing about it.

My head knows very well tomorrow and the day after won’t be possible – but that little devil on my left shoulder permanently drizzles its poison into my ear and makes my brain fuzzy.
So for the past few months, I have been trying to calm myself down and try to practice patience. How to do that? There are so many different things that are suggested, and I think I tried them all.
Toni Bernhard J.D. writes that she can turn impatience into patience by distracting herself. For example, being stuck in traffic, she starts concentrating on models, colors, and drivers of the other cars. It helps her keep her mind and eyes off the clock.

This, I decided was a good start, but I figured it would be asked to much to listen to the radio to find out where there’s a traffic jam, only to find out how to distract myself… in particular since I’m not in a hurry anyway.

So I tried to distract and calm me with other things. Going for forest walks and swimming helps me a lot, in particular, to focus on myself and my way of dealing with things. Writing lists on what still has to be done, what the delay is and when that particular problem with my delay will be solved. To see it in written form helps me to see more clearly and not listen to my little devil.

I’ve been doing so much research on the things that need to be done before flawlessly publishing a book, that I have been prepared for this and accepted it. Which means, any hold-up is only caused by the weakest link in the chain: myself (or whatever ghost is hunting me currently) Everyone else does a fantastic job with their part of work on my book.

I want it done right, and I won’t let any little devil torpedo my dream, only because I permit my impatience coming the better of me.

This is a wonderful opportunity to say ‘Thank you’ to all the people working on this book currently: my cover designer, my editor, and my lawyer. You’re doing such an amazing job!! Thanks so much!!

Are you never impatient? What it is that causes it, in terms of writing? And how do you deal with it? Please let us know, we’re curious.

 

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Picture courtesy of: https://www.askideas.com/60/what-is-destructive-is-impatience-haste-expecting-too-much-too-fast-may-sarton/

 

 

Quick Tips for Paperback Page Numbering

Jo Robinson from LitWorldInterview once more provides us with excellent and helpful tips for self publishing. This time it’s the page numbering! Thank you Jo!! We are grateful for all your informative work!

Lit World Interviews

When numbering the pages of your paperback manuscript, the thing quite a lot of Indies have trouble with is that they use Page Breaks rather than Section Breaks. A Page Break is just that—starting a new page within the same section of a book. With a Section Break you can have totally different numbers and Headers and Footers for each section. The way to ensure that your numbering doesn’t bounce back from the first chapter of your book to the front matter is to get rid of all the Page Breaks in first pages and replace them with Section Breaks.

page-break
Section Break after title page, and again after the table of contents, and every other page you have in your front matter.

section-break
Then double click into your Headers and Footers up to and including the first page of your first chapter, and unlick Link to Previous. This will ensure that…

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March/April 2016 Writing Contests

It’s such a pleasure to be able and permitted to re-blog the March/April 2016 writing contests, provided by the hard work of Rachel Poli! Thanks so much Rachel, you’re a gem!

Rachel Poli

March April 2016 Writing ContestsMarch 2016

Type: Short story/flash fiction
Hosted by: Grammar Ghoul Press
Deadline: March 13, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Poetry about Food
Hosted by: Literal Latte
Deadline: March 15, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Nonfiction
Hosted by: Bellingham Review
Deadline: March 15, 2016
Entry Fee: $20

Type: Nonfiction about Dreams and Synchronicities
Hosted by: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: March 31, 2016
Entry Fee: None

Type: Nonfiction about The Spirit of Canada
Hosted by: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: March 31, 2016
Entry Fee: None

Type: Christian work
Hosted by: Oregon Christian Writers
Deadline: March 31, 2016
Entry Fee: $35 for members, $45 for non-members

Type: Fiction and nonfiction
Hosted by: Narrative Magazine
Deadline: March 31, 2016
Entry Fee: $24

April 2016

Type: Short story
Hosted by: First Writer
Deadline: April 1, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Nonfiction (The Joy of Christmas)
Hosted by: Chicken…

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Business, Business: Author Resources

This is a useful and carefully researched list of links for authors. Thank you for your hard work, author Phillip T. Stephens. We appreciate your efforts!

Wind Eggs

Updated October 12, 2015

I spent the last couple of weeks combing through Goodreads posts looking for review sites for my new novel Cigerets, Guns & Beer, available in paperback and eBook. Here’s the plug:

Dodd breaks up a convenience store robbery on his way through the tiny Texas town of Sweet Water Falls Texas. What’s the thanks he gets? The sheriff won’t let him leave, the car lot can’t find the parts for his vintage Mustang and he seems caught in a rivalry between women looking for some new blood.

It seems a family named Dodd were killed robbing the bank in the forties and a half million dollars was never found. Everyone thinks Dodd returned to find the missing money and no one intends to let him leave until he recovers the missing money and maybe, just maybe, a long lost flying saucer.

During that time I compiled…

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Battling Piracy of Your Books and Stealing Royalties

What to do if your hard work is pirated. Here you will find the answer.

anastaciamoore

Pirares This is a warning to ALL authors out there, whether you are traditionally or self published. BEWARE of unscrupulous people pirating your hard work and stealing your well deserved royalties by stealing your books and e-pubs and turning around and hawking them on such sites as EBay, Youtube and other sites.

As I was meandering around the internet the other night I happened to look at my own book trailers on You Tube to see how they were fairing. Much to my chagrin under the title “Curse of The Salute” I saw where someone was advertising on You Tube a link to my and other e-pubs for people to go there and receive copies of said books. Needles to say I was quite UPSET.

A little further research, by googling titles of my books revealed on google other sites such as EBay and other links offering not only printed versions…

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