5 Reasons Tech Can’t Replace Editors – Written By Lisa Norman

on Writers in the Storm Blog:

Have you seen the new products on the market to replace live editors with an automated intelligence? I see authors spending a lot of money on these services, while being excited that they can now save the money they used to spend on editors.

I see editors moving to other careers or accepting impoverishing fees just trying to stay marketable.

Pick up a newspaper and you’ll see that more and more publications are using automation instead of live, intuitive, experienced editors.

A friend recently asked me to help decipher a recipe that was in a published, highly rated cookbook. It included such ingredients as “tortured cream” (whipped cream) and “evening meal exercises” (dinner rolls).

Aside from the above silliness, here are my top 5 reasons why I was horrified to learn some publishers are switching to automation for editing their clients’ books:

Continue reading HERE

TOP TEN THINGS NOT TO DO IF YOU DECIDE TO SELF-PUBLISH YOUR BOOK – Written By John W. Howell

Photo by ron dyar on Unsplash

This post originally ran on October 12th, 2015. Those with memories of an elephant might like it again. For the rest of us, I hope you enjoy it.

* * *

The inspiration for this list is my latest effort to self-publish the next John J. Cannon story titled His Revenge. Since I had absolutely no experience in publishing, the journey was a long winding road marked by plenty of mistakes. I’m sure the trial and error method is not over yet, but here is some of what I learned. Don’t forget I’m a fiction writer, so some of these lessons have been enhanced with dubious facts to make them more exciting and hopefully humorous. I would, therefore, resist publishing this list on the Huffington Post. (hear that, Arianna?)

Top Ten Things Not to Do if You Decide to Self-Publish Your Book

10 If you decide to self-Publish your book, do not drink any alcoholic beverages four weeks before and two weeks after you hit the publish button. If you do, at best, those little things you forgot are not necessary. At worst, you find out after six weeks you submitted the wrong cover with the manuscript. (You know the one. It has “fiction” spelled “fuction”).

9 If you decide to self-publish your book, do not try to edit the manuscript yourself. If you do, at best, you will have a fool for an editor. At worst, your book will be featured on a blog with the lovely title of “The Poorest Written Books of the Year.” (You are so lucky to have the top position)

8 If you decide to self-publish your book, do not think you don’t need to know how to format the interior. If you do, at best, your readers will be treated to several blank lines. At worst, your book will resemble something created by a room full of monkeys on keyboards. (Yeah, it can be done, but that one page with only the word “then” on it took the cake)

CONTINUE READING HERE

What to Do When You’re Approached by an Overseas Publisher – Written By AskALLi Team

on Self Publishing Advice:

The moment you receive an email from a publisher or licenser pitching you for a potential rights deal, is an exciting moment.

While there are also lots of scammers in the world, there are also many genuine publishers and licensers out there who really do want to partner with you.

Today, the Alliance of Independent Authors AskALLi team looks at what you should do when you’re approached by an overseas publisher.

As soon as you achieve success as an indie author, you’re going to be approached directly regarding foreign rights or other rights deals as–unless you have an agent–you are the point of call for your books.

This might feel odd at first. You might instinctively think it’s a scam, as we’re so used to doing things independently, with no help or support. This post will help you weed out the scam from the genuine deal and tell you what to do when you’re approached by an overseas publisher or other rights buyer.

Continue reading HERE

Getting Started with BookBub Ads: Growing a New Pen Name – Written By Sophie Brent

on BookBub Insights:

Over the past few years, advertising via BookBub Ads and other display ad platforms has become an increasingly important part of many authors’ book marketing plans, but getting started with ad campaigns can be a daunting experience.

To help guide authors who are dipping their toes into digital advertising for the first time, we interviewed four authors who created their very first BookBub Ads campaigns earlier this year. We’re sharing their experiences in a four-part series where they each discuss why they decided to start running BookBub Ads, what resources they used to set themselves up for success, how they set up their first campaigns, and everything they learned along the way!

In this post, cozy mystery author Sophie Brent — who also writes traditionally published romance and self-published nonfiction guides for writers under the name Nina Harrington —  shares the lessons she learned about running ads to establish an audience for this new pen name.

Continue reading HERE

What Are the Types of Editing? (6 Types To Know) – Written By Sarah Rexford

on The Book Designer:

If you’re a writer, by now you likely personally understand the phrase: all writing is rewriting. Writers get an idea, convert that idea into a draft, and then edit, edit, edit until they’re satisfied with every word.

It’s a long process, but knowing the impact writing makes in the lives of readers is worth it.

Here’s some good news: You can shorten the process.

Taking the time to really understand the different types of editing and which one is best for your particular process will save you time and energy. It will also help get your book out into the world with edits specific to your book’s needs, and take it from good to great.

As said above, all writing is rewriting. But there are different types of rewriting. Each type of rewrite focuses on a different aspect of your story. Depending on what you’re writing, why you’re writing it, and who you’re writing it for will play a big part in choosing what type of editing is best for you.

Continue reading HERE

7 New Agents Seeking Commercial Fiction (all genres), Memoir, Literary Fiction, Kidlit, Romance, Fantasy and more – Written By Erica Verrillo

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are seven new agents actively expanding their client lists.

Hannah Todd (UK) is actively looking for commercial fiction across all genres including women’s fiction; police procedurals; clever thrillers; cosy crime; romantic comedies; accessible historical fiction focusing on WW2 and including dual timeline novels; sagas; emotional issues-led fiction.

Madison Scalera wants domestic fiction, historical fiction, romance, and memoirs, particularly coming-of-age novels.

Dani Segelbaum is looking for narrative non-fiction, popular culture, fashion, lifestyle, feminism, memoir, contemporary fiction, literary fiction, politics, and cookbooks.

Elizabeth Fithian is looking for creators and creator/illustrators who create non-fiction, picture books, middle grade, YA fiction, and graphic novels. On the adult side, she’s eager to find a debut novel, as well as book club fiction, narrative non-fiction, literary fiction, memoir, fantasy, and mystery.

Tasneem Motala is interested in character-driven MG and YA fiction and graphic novels, with or without a touch of magic, written by BIPOC (black, indigenous, and other people of color) authors only.

Rachel Altemose represents a diverse array of genres (children’s through adult) and is particularly keen on narratives with unique voices, diverse perspectives, immersive settings, complicated familial relationships, young/twenty-something protagonists, magical realism/surrealism, or experimental style.

Barbara Jones is looking for fiction and nonfiction, from highly literary works to much more commercial fare.

Always check the agency website and agent bio before submitting. Agents can switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change. 

NOTEDon’t submit to two agents at the same agency simultaneously. If one rejects you, you may then submit to another.

Get Full Details HERE

How To Self-Publish Short Stories On Amazon KDP – Written By Derek Haines…

on Just Publishing Advice:

Can you self-publish short stories on Amazon KDP? Yes, you can.

There are many sites online where you can publish your short stories for free. If you are a new writer, it’s a great way to find readers.

However, if you want to earn money from your writing, self-publishing your short stories as a Kindle ebook is the best route to take.

Before you jump in though, you need to make sure that your short story ebook complies with the Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) guidelines.

Continue reading HERE

WRITING ARTICLES

6 Unique Ways to Think Up Story Ideas – Written By Ryan Lanz


Ask any successful author what question they get asked the most, and they’ll likely say “How do you come up with your ideas?”

We’ve all had our days where our mental engines have sputtered. Many beginning writers have the fear that they won’t be able to come up with enough ideas. I can relate to that back when I first started.

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.” – John Steinbeck

Some people write quickly, but it’s not unheard of to take a year to write and polish a novel. As long as you can think up just one idea a year, you’ve got something to work on.

I firmly believe that the best way to come up with ideas is to simply live your life. Every single writer comes up with story ideas every day. The thing is, some writers aren’t fully receiving them. I equate it to opportunity. Everyone has opportunities that come their way, but if they don’t recognize them, or embrace them, they’ll whisk by.

The trick is to be ready for an idea when it comes. And I don’t only mean ready with a pen and notebook. I mean mentally ready to recognize that your random thought could be a useful idea. When you pass by an intriguing billboard, when a friend says something interesting, when one of life’s tidbits strikes you as ironic, or when you overcome an obstacle in your personal life, they all can be converted into the foundation of your next story if you see it as such.

CONTINUE READING HERE

Do You, Like, Like Like? – Written By Nicholas Rossis

I mentioned in my previous post how we had some American friends stay with us over the summer. One of them was a teen girl who, as teens do, used “like” every now and then. A habit I soon found myself repeating.

Then I came across an interesting article on The Economist on this very subject and I started to wonder: like, where does “like” fit in? And is it useful, or simply an irritating extra word, to be cut off a sentence with the ferocity of a gardener weeding off his prized roses?

To answer that question, we must first understand the many uses of like.

The Beatnik Like

As The Economist explains, the first kind of like, sometimes referred to as “beatnik like,” is an expression of wonderment. It is found in decades-old exclamations such as “Like, wow, man.”

This use is now considered so rare that one scholar even considers it to have been apocryphal, more ascribed to beatniks than actually uttered by them.

CONTINUE READING HERE