5 Mistakes That Keep Readers From Following Authors on Social Media – Written By Jenn Hanson-DePaula

I found this excellent blog post on the Mixtus Media blog, written by Jenn Hanson-DePaula on why readers won’t follow us authors on social media. Thank you very much for this article, Jenn.


Social media is, hands down, one of the best ways to connect with new people all over the world. And yet, we still struggle with actually making those connections.

Why? Well, I tend to think that it’s because we have tried to make social media fit into marketing. That’s like trying to fit a square peg into a round hole. We use social media to broadcast our marketing message when we actually need to use it as it was designed to be used: as a way for actual human beings to interact with each other.

Social media can be incredibly powerful. I’ve seen and experienced its power first hand. It’s amazing to meet people all over the world and connect with them in a genuine and authentic way.

But if you’ve had a bad experience with social media, chances are there are just a few things that you need to adjust to get everything back on track.

I’ve broken down the top five mistakes that I’ve seen authors make on social media that keep readers from engaging with you.

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How to Market Your Self-Published Book to Independent Bookstores – Written By Penny Sansevieri

Thank you for this very informative blog post, Penny Sansevieri. You gave me excellent advice, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s grateful.


Not everyone may say it, but it’s in everybody’s dreams to see their published books on a shelf in an independent bookstore.

This desire is justified: obviously, every one of us wants to go down in history as a person who wrote a bestseller or even a masterpiece that future generations will gladly read.

This seems like a wonderful dream that just comes true when you finish writing your book. Yet, in reality, not everything is as easy as it may seem. It’s likely that a publishing house will refuse to work with you or the editor won’t like your book. Besides, the added expense of working with a publishing house can strip you of the money that you can put into really smart book promotion strategies.

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Where Do Your Ideas Come From? – Written By Don Massenzio

Don is a very gifted author who is generously sharing his experience and wisdom with all of us. Thank you so much, Don Massenzio!


As I look at my writing notebook (you should consider carrying one), I see the dozens of story, setting and character ideas that I have collected and I’m both inspired and anxious.

There are many ideas that I want to turn into stories. It’s hard to write one at a time. At any given time I have a book and some kind of serial or short story going at the same time. This is tough with a 50 hour per seek day job and 45 weeks of travel per year, but I somehow manage to squeeze in some writing.

As I looked at these ideas, I began thinking about where the ideas that I’ve recorded come from. It though that telling you some of my sources might help you look at some idea generation possibilities you might not have thought of.

Characters

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The Cut and Paste Thief and What To Do If You’ve Been Plagiarized – Written by Diana Hurwitz

Diana Hurwitz informs us about what to do if we’ve been plagiarized. Thank you for a very educational blog post Diana.


As Maryann Miller detailed in her March post, recently a hack named Cristiane Serruya came up with what she thought was a clever scheme.

She trimmed paragraphs from multiple books, quilted them together, then published them as her own work.

She changed the titles, character names, and a word here or there.

The results were a bit like Frankenstein’s monster, but she got away with it, for a while.

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Two ways to write about physical violence in crime fiction and thrillers – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby is a line editor, copyeditor and proofreader who specializes in working with independent authors of commercial fiction, particularly crime, thriller and mystery writers.

Louise provides us with two ways to write about physical violence in crime fiction and thrillers, a phenomenal blog post which I had to share.

Thank you, Louise.


Not every reader can stomach violence in fiction, and not every writer wants to go the whole hog with it. Here are two ways to approach it: compressed reporting after the fact; and showing it all as it happens.

Compressed reporting after the fact

Reporting the outcome of violence after the fact can be a superb alternative to detailed descriptions that might upset or sicken authors and their readers. This technique is used on the screen too.

In Series 5, Episode 3 of Line of Duty (BBC1), the perpetrator breaks into the home of a core character’s ex-wife. The transgressor proceeds to torture the victim. There’s a drill involved and lots of screaming. It’s gross. Well, it would be if we saw it. But we don’t. All we see is the outcome.

The ex-wife lies in a hospital bed, bandaged from head to toe. We glimpse patches of skin, her flesh swollen and angry. Her face is physically untouched though trauma is etched into it. And even the slightest movement results in a whimper and a wince; despite the medication, she’s in pain. All we know so far is that something awful has happened to her but we don’t know what.

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How To Help Stop Somebody Stealing Your Blog Posts – Written By Hugh W. Roberts

On Hugh’s Views and News I found an important blog post about how to help stop somebody stealing your blog posts. Thank you very much for all your efforts to help us bloggers! We really appreciate it!


I recently stumbled upon a blog where the author had copied and was using my blog posts. No pingbacks or mention that I was the original author, just plain copy and pasting of some of my posts and images. It left me feeling angry, yet I also felt honoured that my work must be good enough if somebody wanted to copy it.

Photo by Lukas on Pexels.com

Unfortunately, with the internet being such a vast and open space used by billions of people worldwide, the chances of that happening to any one of us who publishes anything on the internet is a distinct possibility. Whether it be photos, fiction, reviews, poetry, recipes or gardening tips, everything faces the chance of being copied and somebody else taking full credit for your hard work.

Read the entire blog post HERE

 

Bad People Make Better Stories: Crafting the Perfect ‘Unlikable’ Character – Written By Kristen Lamb

Today I found a phenomenal blog post about crafting the perfect ‘unlikable’ character in a story. Kristen Lamb published a blog post in her own inimitable way, to teach us how to create a character that makes our story interesting. Thank you, Kristen!


Bad people make better stories. Why? Because I cannot say this enough, ‘Fiction is about one thing and one thing only—PROBLEMS.’

Who better to create a lot of problems than damaged, broken, unlikable, foolish and possibly even unredeemable human beings?

***I use the term ‘human beings’ for all characters because aliens, otherworldly beings, and any ‘thinking’ creature will possess anthropomorphic (human-like) qualities.

So why do ‘bad people’ make better stories?

Perfect people, first of all, are unicorns and don’t exist. Secondly, they are boring. Thirdly, we can’t relate to them because we aren’t unicorns (just deluded we are ).

What’s the story killer with perfect people? To be blunt, these characters have nowhere to grow. Since ‘perfect people’ handle every crisis with a level head and can be trusted to always do the right thing, the reader won’t ever worry.

If the reader never worries, guess what kiddies? You don’t have a story, you have a lot of words.

Villains are a whole other post. So is the Big Boss Troublemaker (our core antagonist responsible for creating the overall story PROBLEM).

Continue reading HERE