Advantages and Disadvantages of Self-Publishing

Ruth Nestvold provides us on her blog with the advantages and disadvantages of self publishing. Thank you Ruth. This is very interesting and to many of us very useful.

Ruth Nestvold - Indie Adventures

Advantages and Disadvantages of Self-Publishing

I am finally (finally!) compiling my “Starting Out as an Indie Author” series into a book, and since I started this weekend, I’ve noticed a couple of things I still need to add. Since the first part of the book revolves around the question, “Is Self-Publishing For You?” I realized I had to write my own version of the consideration of the pros and cons of indie and traditional publishing. (I have a few more things up my sleeve that I will probably blog about in the next week or two.)

So with no further ado, here’s my take on the debate:

Advantages of Self Publishing

– Speed

A traditionally published novel can easily take up to two years from the time it is accepted to the time it actually comes out. And that isn’t even counting the years of sending the manuscript out to agents and editors.

By comparison…

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Video: Basic Setup Process of a Book on Createspace

Rachael Ritchey has taken time to provide us with a step-by-step guide to use CreateSpace. I’m thrilled and I’m sure many other debut novelists are too! Thank you so much Rachael!! You rock!

Fiction by Rachael Ritchey

Platforms

I know it’s been too long since I last touched on this great series: How Not to Get Overwhelmed with Indie Publishing, but life hasn’t slowed down all summer long! 🙂 I’ve finally got a video tutorial put together for you on the basics of setting up a Createspace account and first book for publishing.


Here are the picture steps to walk through. Really, everything here is fairly self-explanatory. If you have questions, please ask and I’ll help you find the answer.  🙂

  1) Sign up for the free account then log in w/your email address and password.

Step 01


2) Add New TitleStep 02


3) Fill in the blanks with the appropriate info. (Red * means info is required)Step 03


4) Now you get to add your author name (pseudonym if that’s how you roll!) and other pertinent info.

Step 04

5) Publication Date is NOT required right away! 🙂

Step 04 - 1


6) ISBN

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Publisher Shopping

Angela Kays Books published an interesting, informative and wonderfully emotional article about her experience with deciding which way to go with her writing. Thank you so much for this blog post! I will get there too soon enough and I appreciate everything I can find.

Lit World Interviews

With my first manuscript finished, it’s time for me to start shopping around for ways to get my novel published. Originally, I wanted to go the way of an agent. I thought it’d bImage result for shoppinge so cool to actually have an agent to want to represent me. I still think so. However, I’ve slowly realized, even before published authors told me, that the publishing world changed drastically from ten, or even five, years ago.

The worse part of it all is that it always depend first on who you know, then it depends on whether you’ve published anything already. It’s a disheartening process. I’ve thought many times that I need to figure out a new direction for my life. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: the only problem with that is I’m 33 years old, and the only thing I feel I know to do is write…

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Common Services for Indie Authors: Are They Worth It?

Let me share this blog post with you. It contains excellent hints and tips when it comes to services for indie authors. The blog is written by August McLaughlin. She is an award-winning health and sexuality writer, radio personality and creator of the empowering female sexuality brand #GirlBoner.

Girl Boner

I’m in the process of finalizing my first non-fiction book for publication. (So stoked!) I’ll reveal more about that soon, but today I want to explore a topic all indie authors face: where to invest our money.

It’s no mystery that self-publishing requires a financial investment. The last thing any serious author should do is write a book, attempt to edit it themselves, slap on a makeshift cover and send it to Amazon. But we also need to be mindful of that little thing called a budget.

Circulation in business

Most indie authors don’t make huge income quickly or at all through their books—though both are possible. It takes awhile for most of us to break even upon publishing, then go on to profit. (It took me a good year to start profiting from In Her Shadow.) Many companies profit far more than writers from self-publishing, and there can be a fine line between a worthy investment and…

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