How to Build a Landing Page that Markets you as an Author

Ted of iceCube Marketing guest posted on Nicholas Rossis’ blog on how to build a landing page that markets you as an author. A great post to re-blog. Thank you Ted and Nicholas!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Ted | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's bookThis is a guest post and infographic by Ted of iceCube Marketing, a digital marketing agency in Singapore that helps local small businesses acquire leads from channels such as Facebook and Google. It offers a wonderful examination of what a successful author home page may consist of and can even serve as a great checklist for you when you design a new one or update yours.

How to Build a Landing Page that Markets you as an Author

Title

The title of your landing page is important. It serves as a hook to grab visitors’ attention. It also gives them a reason to look deeper into your website. The title of your landing page may or may not be the same as that of a book. Either, have a title that is benefit-driven and arouses curiosity.

Your First Impression

The first thing visitors should see is an image. The image…

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The Origins Of English

Nicholas C. Rossis published a phenomenal article about the origins of English. Thanks so much, Nicholas. This is exciting!

Nicholas C. Rossis

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators. Educator Claire Bowern and Director Patrick Smith have produced a great little film that explains the origins of English. As they explain, when we talk about ‘English’, we often think of it as a single language. But what do the dialects spoken in dozens of countries around the world have in common with each other, or with the writings of Chaucer? The Origins Of English traces the language from the present day back to its ancient roots, showing how English has evolved through generations of speakers.

Going Further Back

However, illustrator Minna Sundberg went even further back. She has captured in an elegant infographic a linguistic tree which reveals some fascinating links between different tongues, illustrating how most of the different languages we speak today can actually be placed in only a couple of groups by their…

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Banned Books Throughout History

Anastasia of “Read & Survive” shares an infographic about banned books with us. I couldn’t resist forwarding it to my followers with a smile. Thank you, Anastasia!

Read & Survive

September 26−October 2, 2016
Banned Books Week
is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types – in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

Moreover, one of my favorite trilogies, His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman was almost banned once. The Catholic League campaigned against The Golden Compass / Northern Lights, declaring that it promoted atheism and attacked Christianity…Well, that it did I guess.

On fantasy & how it encourages difficult behavior: Reading Harry Potter books makes children MENTALLY ILL says headmaster who warns letting them become ‘addicted’ to fantasy novels is as bad as feeding them ‘heaps of…

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Introducing Personality Disorders to add to one of your characters III

In case you plan to add a personality disorder to one of your characters, I thought it might be an idea to list the ten major PD’s, separated in three cluster types and a list of symptoms.

 

In my last blog post, I have provided you with the Cluster types B of Personality disorders. To repeat the differences real quick, you will find here below the different Cluster types again:

 

Cluster A (Odd, bizarre, eccentric)

Paranoid PD, Schizoid PD, Schizotypal PD

 

Cluster B (Dramatic, erratic)

Antisocial PD, Borderline PD, Histrionic PD, Narcissistic PD

 

Cluster C (Anxious, fearful)

Avoidant PD, Dependent PD, Obsessive-compulsive PD

 

 

Cluster C types

Cluster C personality disorders are characterized by anxious, fearful thinking or behavior. They include avoidant personality disorder, dependent personality disorder, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. It’s not necessary to exhibit all the signs and symptoms listed for a disorder to be diagnosed.

According to the Mayo Clinic here is a short list of symptoms to each personality disorder of Cluster B:

 

Avoidant personality disorder

  • Too sensitive to criticism or rejection
  • Feeling inadequate, inferior or unattractive
  • Avoidance of work activities that require interpersonal contact
  • Social inhibition, timidity, and isolation, especially avoiding new activities or meeting strangers
  • Extreme shyness in social situations and personal relationships
  • Fear of disapproval, embarrassment or ridicule

 

Dependent personality disorder

  • Excessive dependence on others and feels the need to be taken care of
  • Submissive or clingy behavior toward others
  • Fear of having to provide self-care or fend for yourself if left alone
  • Lack of self-confidence, requiring excessive advice and reassurance from others to make even small decisions
  • Difficulty starting or doing projects on own due to lack of self-confidence
  • Difficulty disagreeing with others, fearing disapproval
  • Tolerance of poor or abusive treatment, even when other options are available
  • Urgent need to start a new relationship when a close one has ended

 

Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder

  • Preoccupation with details, orderliness, and rules
  • Extreme perfectionism, resulting in dysfunction and distress when perfection is not achieved, such as feeling unable to finish a project because you don’t meet your own strict standards
  • Desire to be in control of people, tasks and situations and inability to delegate tasks
  • Neglect of friends and enjoyable activities because of excessive commitment to work or a project
  • Inability to discard broken or worthless objects
  • Rigid and stubborn
  • Inflexible about morality, ethics or values
  • Tight, miserly control over budgeting and spending money

 

To get an overview of the Cluster C types, you will find here below the infographic:

ClusterC_PD

These were my lists of the ten known personality disorders. I hope I have created some overview for you which might make it easy to add one of these personality disorders to one of your fictional characters.

If you like to read more about these particular mental health disabilities, please use the “sources links.”

____________________________________________________________________

 

Sources :

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201205/the-10-personality-disorders

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/basics/symptoms/con-20030111

Introducing Personality Disorders to add to one of your characters II

In case you plan to add a personality disorder to one of your characters, I thought it might be an idea to list the ten major PD’s, separated in three cluster types and a list of symptoms.

 

In my last blog post, I have provided you with the Cluster types A of Personality disorders. To repeat the differences real quick, you will find here below the different Cluster types again:

 

Cluster A (Odd, bizarre, eccentric)

Paranoid PD, Schizoid PD, Schizotypal PD

Cluster B (Dramatic, erratic)

Antisocial PD, Borderline PD, Histrionic PD, Narcissistic PD

Cluster C (Anxious, fearful)

Avoidant PD, Dependent PD, Obsessive-compulsive PD

 

 

Cluster B types

 

Cluster B personality disorders are characterized by dramatic, overly emotional or unpredictable thinking or behavior. They include antisocial personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder. It’s not necessary to exhibit all the signs and symptoms listed for a disorder to be diagnosed.

According to the Mayo Clinic here is a short list of symptoms to each personality disorder of Cluster B:

 

Antisocial personality disorder

  • Disregard for others’ needs or feelings
  • Persistent lying, stealing, using aliases, conning others
  • Recurring problems with the law
  • Repeated violation of the rights of others
  • Aggressive, often violent behavior
  • Disregard for the safety of self or others
  • Impulsive behavior
  • Consistently irresponsible
  • Lack of remorse for behavior

 

Borderline personality disorder

  • Impulsive and risky behavior, such as having unsafe sex, gambling or binge eating
  • Unstable or fragile self-image
  • Unstable and intense relationships
  • Up and down moods, often as a reaction to interpersonal stress
  • Suicidal behavior or threats of self-injury
  • Intense fear of being alone or abandoned
  • Ongoing feelings of emptiness
  • Frequent, intense displays of anger
  • Stress-related paranoia that comes and goes

 

Histrionic personality disorder

  • Constantly seeking attention
  • Excessively emotional, dramatic or sexually provocative to gain attention
  • Speaks dramatically with strong opinions, but few facts or details to back them up
  • Easily influenced by others
  • Shallow, rapidly changing emotions
  • Excessive concern with physical appearance
  • Thinks relationships with others are closer than they really are

 

Narcissistic personality disorder

  • Belief that you’re special and more important than others
  • Fantasies about power, success and attractiveness
  • Failure to recognize others’ needs and feelings
  • Exaggeration of achievements or talents
  • Expectation of constant praise and admiration
  • Arrogance
  • Unreasonable expectations of favors and advantages, often taking advantage of others
  • Envy of others or belief that others envy you

 

 

To get an overview of the Cluster B types, you will find here below the infographic:

ClusterB_PD

 

To give each one of the clusters plenty of attention, I will provide you with the cluster C personality disorders in my next blog post.

If you like to read more about these particular mental health disabilities, please use the “sources links.”

____________________________________________________________________

 

Sources :

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201205/the-10-personality-disorders

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/basics/symptoms/con-20030111

Introducing Personality Disorders to add to one of your characters I

Do you think of writing a novel with a “disturbed” agonist? Do you have a victim in your novel with a “mental disorder”? Do you know which kind of mental disturbance your character has?

I have done some research to make it easier for you and to list a few of the most common and defined Personality disorders for you to use.

 

According to “Psychology Today” DM-5  lists ten personality disorders and allocates each to one of three groups or ‘clusters’: A, B, or C

 

Let’s have a look at them:

 

Cluster A (Odd, bizarre, eccentric)

Paranoid PD, Schizoid PD, Schizotypal PD

 

Cluster B (Dramatic, erratic)

Antisocial PD, Borderline PD, Histrionic PD, Narcissistic PD

 

Cluster C (Anxious, fearful)

Avoidant PD, Dependent PD, Obsessive-compulsive PD

 

Cluster A types:

 

Cluster A personality disorders are characterized by odd, eccentric thinking or behavior. They include paranoid personality disorder, schizoid personality disorder, and schizotypal personality disorder. It’s not necessary to exhibit all the signs and symptoms listed for a disorder to be diagnosed.

 

To make it easier, we’ll leave a detailed description aside and will simply show the symptoms as listed by the Mayo Clinic:

 

Paranoid personality disorder

  • Pervasive distrust and suspicion of others and their motives
  • Unjustified belief that others are trying to harm or deceive you
  • Unjustified suspicion of the loyalty or trustworthiness of others
  • Hesitant to confide in others due to unreasonable fear that others will use the information against you
  • Perception of innocent remarks or nonthreatening situations as personal insults or attacks
  • Angry or hostile reaction to perceived slights or insults
  • Tendency to hold grudges
  • Unjustified, recurrent suspicion that spouse or sexual partner is unfaithful

 

Schizoid personality disorder

  • Lack of interest in social or personal relationships, preferring to be alone
  • Limited range of emotional expression
  • Inability to take pleasure in most activities
  • Inability to pick up normal social cues
  • Appearance of being cold or indifferent to others
  • Little or no interest in having sex with another person

 

Schizotypal personality disorder

  • Peculiar dress, thinking, beliefs, speech or behavior
  • Odd perceptual experiences, such as hearing a voice whisper your name
  • Flat emotions or inappropriate emotional responses
  • Social anxiety and a lack of or discomfort with close relationships
  • Indifferent, inappropriate or suspicious response to others
  • “Magical thinking” — believing you can influence people and events with your thoughts
  • Belief that certain casual incidents or events have hidden messages meant specifically for you

 

Or, if some infographic might help you: here it is:

ClusterA_PD

 

To give each one of the clusters plenty of attention, I will provide you with the cluster B personality disorders in my next blog post.

If you like to read more about these particular mental health disabilities, please use the “sources links.”

____________________________________________________________________

 

Sources :

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201205/the-10-personality-disorders

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/basics/symptoms/con-20030111

 

Collective Nouns for Animal Groups Infographic…

You never know what’s good for: Here’s a list of nouns for animal-groups. Chris, The Story Reading Ape provided us with this information. I could imagine, “a sneak of weasels” aren’t probably seen in a crime story located in the Walll Street anno 2135. But keep it anyway. Thanks Chris!

 

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

In case you ever need to know 😀

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Source: WriteAtHome.com

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