The Dos and Don’ts of Self-Publishing A Book…

What a great article, written by Lorna Sixsmith. I found it on The Story Reading Ape’s blog which makes it easier for me to re-blog. It’s very informative and important to me, being a new author and still in the middle of a learning process.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Lorna Sixsmith  on the Write on Track site:

Self-publishing a book is hugely exciting and a great achievement.

While much of it is straightforward, it can be a scary prospect particularly if you are investing in printed copies in significant numbers.

Having just self-published my second book aimed at a farming readership, I found that I am still learning and yes, it is easy to make mistakes.

Here’s my list of things you should do and things you should either avoid or consider very carefully.

Find out more at:

The Dos and Don’ts

View original post

Advertisements

Titles – How Important Are They and How Do You Come Up With Them?

Author Don Massenzio informs us about title and how important they are. Thank you for this great article, Don!

Author Don Massenzio

Many authors who write book series, James Patterson, Janet Evanovich and Sue Grafton, to name a few, have written books that have common words in them. Patterson uses the word ‘Cross’, as in his character, Alex Cross, in such books as Cross My Heart, Cross Country, etc. Interestingly enough, however, he started out titling his Alex Cross books with nursery rhyme references like Along Came a Spider and Jack and Jill. 

Janet Evanovich uses numbers for her Stephanie Plum novels. She started with One for the Money and is about to release Hardcore Twenty Four. Sue Grafton used the more limiting letter scheme for her titles. Starting with A is for Alibi, she is now about to release Y is for Yesterday. Having titles like these for a series is a great marketing idea and, in the case of Evanovich and Grafton, it gives you an idea…

View original post 443 more words

October/November 2017 Writing Contests

Rachel Poli listed the October/November 2017 writing contests for us. Thank you so much for your efforts, Rachel.

Rachel Poli

October/November 2017 Writing ContestsOctober 2017

Genre: Fiction
Theme: Short story (new writers only)
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: October 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $18
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Christmas and Holiday
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: October 31, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Creative Nonfiction essay
Theme: N/A
Website: WOW! Women On Writing
Deadline: October 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $12
Prize: $500

November 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: November 6, 2017
Entry Fee: $20
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Flash fiction and short story
Theme: N/A
Website: Fireside Fiction
Deadline: November 11, 2017 (opens on November 5)
Entry Fee: N/A
Prize: Pays 12.5 cents per word

Genre: Popular fiction (romance, YA, thriller, crime, horror, sci-fi)
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: November 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $25
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Short Short Story
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: November 15…

View original post 139 more words

37 Top Book Awards for Authors in 2017

Scott Lorenz, a Book Publicist, informs us about book awards for authors. Thank you very much Scott, this is very helpful.

The Book Publicist

Book Awards for Authors

Enter Book Award Contests and Become an Award Winning Author in 2017!

By Scott Lorenz

Westwind Communications

“Do book awards matter?”  YES!!

As a book publicist I can assure you they absolutely do matter! One client won several awards and was contacted by two movie producers about her Young Adult Sci-Fi Fantasy Fiction novel.  Another one of my clients won the prestigious Los Angeles Book Festival award. That then led to a flurry of media interest, which subsequently led to a major New York agent deciding to represent the book and pitch it to all the major publishing houses. This author, needless to say, was happy he decided to enter.

You win awards you sell more products.  Jeff Bezos, CEO Amazon

Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference (Photo news.techniblogic.com

Recently a business book client won a major award which caused CNN to reach out to request the book.

View original post 1,673 more words

A Research On The Most Exquisite Jewelry on Earth

Being bored lately and reading a good book I once more stumbled across the famous “Faberge Eggs” and finally decided to do some real research on them. Of course, I had heard of them earlier, saw the one or other picture, but I never tried to find out where exactly they came from, how many existed and still exist and how exactly they look like.

I thought, I never know when it mind come in handy knowing more about all this and went to work. Maybe either one of you writers can use this information for one of your books, so, if you can – help yourself!

***********************************************************************************************************

Picture courtesy of wikipedia

Peter Carl Fabergé

Peter Carl Fabergé, also known as Karl Gustavovich Faberge (Karl Gustavovich Faberzhe; 30 May 1846 – 24 September 1920), was a Russian jeweller best known for the famous Fabergé eggs made in the style of genuine Easter eggs, but using precious metals and gemstones rather than more mundane materials.

He was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia, to the Baltic German jeweller Gustav Fabergé and his Danish wife Charlotte Jungstedt.
In 1864, Peter Carl embarked upon a Grand Tour of Europe. He received tuition from respected goldsmiths in Germany, France and England, attended a course at Schloss’s Commercial College in Paris, and viewed the objects in the galleries of Europe’s leading museums.
His travel and study continued until 1872, when at the age of 26 he returned to St. Petersburg and married Augusta Julia Jacobs. For the following 10 years, his father’s trusted workmaster Hiskias Pendin acted as his mentor and tutor.

When Peter Carl took over the House, there was a move from producing jewelry in the then-fashionable French 18th century style to becoming artist-jewellers. Fabergé’s production of the very first so-called Fabergé egg, the Hen Egg, given as a gift from the Tsar to his wife Maria Fyodorovna on Orthodox Easter (24 March) of 1885 so delighted her that on 1 May the Emperor assigned Fabergé the title Goldsmith by special appointment to the Imperial Crown of that year.

In light of the Empress’ response to receiving one of Fabergé’s eggs on Easter, the Tsar soon commissioned the company to make an Easter egg as a gift for her every year thereafter. The Tsar placed an order for another egg the following year. Beginning in 1887, the Tsar apparently gave Carl Fabergé complete freedom with regard to egg designs, which then became more and more elaborate. According to Fabergé Family tradition, not even the Tsar knew what form they would take— the only stipulation was that each one should be unique and each should contain a surprise. Upon the death of Alexander III, his son, the next Tsar, Nicholas II, followed this tradition and expanded it by requesting that there be two eggs each year, one for his mother (who was eventually given a total of 30 such eggs) and one for his wife, Alexandra (who received another 20). These Easter gift eggs are today distinguished from the other jeweled eggs Fabergé ended up producing by their designation as “Imperial Easter eggs” or “Tsar Imperial Easter eggs”. The tradition continued until the October Revolution when the entire Romanov dynasty was executed and the eggs and many other treasures were confiscated by the interim government. The two final eggs were never delivered nor paid for.

In 1916, the House of Fabergé became a joint-stock company with a capital of 3-million rubles.
The following year upon the outbreak of the October Revolution, the business was taken over by a ‘Committee of the Employees of the Company K Fabergé. In 1918 The House of Fabergé was nationalised by the Bolsheviks. In early October the stock was confiscated. The House of Fabergé was no more.

After the nationalisation of the business, Carl Fabergé left St. Petersburg on the last diplomatic train for Riga. In mid-November, the Revolution having reached Latvia, he fled to Germany and first settled in Bad Homburg and then in Wiesbaden. Eugène, the Fabergés’ eldest, travelled with his mother in darkness by sleigh and on foot through snow-covered woods and reached Finland in December 1918. During June 1920, Eugène reached Wiesbaden and accompanied his father to Switzerland where other members of the family had taken refuge at the Bellevue Hotel in Pully, near Lausanne.
Peter Carl Fabergé never recovered from the shock of the Russian Revolution He died in Switzerland on September 24, 1920. His family believed he died of a broken heart.

(Source: Wikipedia)

***********************************************************************************************************

The Fabergé Eggs

It seems there was a total of 65 Faberge Eggs made, 50 of them were the so called “Imperial Eggs,” gifts from the Tsar of Russia to either wife or wife and mother.

I could, of course, go and name each one of them, copy and insert all necessary information. This would guarantee you’re bored to death and that this blog post would reach from here to Outer Mongolia, but I found, in fact, a page, who provides us with all necessary and interesting information about the eggs. The year they were made, who they were made for, the owners, pictures and more.
Thank you very much, Mieks, of ‘Wintraeken‘, Netherlands, who has created the most informative and colorful pages about the Faberge Eggs.

Clicking HERE takes you directly to Miek’s list of eggs. Each egg-name turns into a pop-up which gives you a picture of the respective egg with all interesting information.

 

 

**********************************************************************************************************

The House of Fabergé

 

After the brand name “House of Fabergé” has been sold – and sold again, serving as a name for cosmetics, alcohol as well as fashion, it finally ended up back in the hands of a family member, Tatjana Faberge who reunited the Family name with the Family in 2007.
The entire history of what happened after the House of Fabergé was nationalized in 1918 can be read on the Fabergé Website. (Click the logo)

Picture courtesy of: Faberge.com

 

And, in case you’re interested, what Fabergé does nowadays, I strongly recommend to check out their website. I believe that they still created some of the most impressive, unique and wonderful jewelry existing. A kaleidoscope of gems, forms, and metal that make the most beautiful woman’s heart beat faster.

 

**********************************************************************************************************

All there’s left to do for me is, showing you my favorite Fabergé-Egg. It is the 1898 ‘Lillies of the Valley’ Egg, a gift from Tsar Nicholas to Alexandra.  Which one is yours?

Picture courtesy of: http://www.wintraecken.nl/

 

 

 

 

How To Organize A Blog Tour – Research by A. J. Alexander

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

During the past years of activity on ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest,’ and the inquiries to publish posts and interviews for different Blog Tours I promised myself once I find the time I would do research on ‘Blog Tours.’ What is this? And why is it so important to writers? Who does organize them and if I have to do that myself, how to do it best?

What is a Blog Tour?

Alessandra Wike writes on “PR by the book”:
The age of the internet gives authors the opportunity to connect with thousands of people. Taking advantage of these seemingly endless possibilities, blog tours provide great publicity for a new book without the hassle (or expense!) of travel. Instead of an author traveling from bookstore to bookstore and city to city, an author’s book can travel virtually from blog to blog and garner hundreds, if not thousands, of views in a short amount of time.

To read the entire blog post, click here.

 

“Reedsy,” writes:

A blog tour is very much like a traditional book tour, where the author would go from town to town to sign their books and meet new readers; except this time, you go from blog to blog. There are countless fiction and non-fiction blogs that have emerged in the past few years, all written by passionate readers who want to share their love of books with other readers. They post book reviews, launch announcements, and interviews with their favorite authors. To continue reading the article on Reedsy, click here.

 

“Bookmaster” for example gives us a hint on what it means to work on a Blog Tour by writing:

A blog book tour can be set up by a publicist, but if an author has self-published and doesn’t have a publicist, they can do the leg work themselves. The key is to find blogs that are relevant to the topic of the book that are interested in participating in the blog book tour. For example, cooking blogs would be the target if you wrote a cookbook and relationship blogs would be the target if you wrote a book that provided love advice. Depending on the topic of the book there could be an unlimited number of blogs, or there might only be a handful if the topic is extremely niche. Each book tour should include a manageable amount of blogs, as the tour requires a significant amount of time from the author. Even though it’s not an in person tour, there is still plenty of work that needs to be done. (The article can be found here)

 

Now: what interested me most is: How do I really organize a Blog Tour? Of course, there are several hints, tips, and tricks from different writers; the basic work seems more or less the same – several have apparently had super-success while others complained that their echo was insufficient.

One article that impressed me was an article, published by Penguin Random House.

For example, does the post answer important questions like:

• What are the benefits of putting your book on a blog tour?
• What types of books work best for blog tours?
• How can an author ensure his or her blog tour is a success?
• How can an author work with his or her publicist to set up an effective blog tour?

or

• What are some best practices when preparing for a blog tour?

The entire article can be read here:
http://authornews.penguinrandomhouse.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-organizing-a-blog-tour/

*****

 

By researching further into the topic, I found another impressive and informative post on Joel Friedlander’s Book Designer’s Blog. He published a guest post, 7 Top eBook Blog Tour Sites, written by Greg Strandberg.

Greg informs about seven eBook Tour Sites, gives prices, information and his opinion to them. I think it’s worth checking them out. He as well links their names to their websites. (For copyright reasons I cannot do this below.)

1. YA Bound Book Tours
2. Xpresso Book Tours
3. Enchanted Book Promotions
4. Bewitching Book Tours
5. Goddess Fish Promotions
6. Sage’s Blog Tours
7. Rockstar Book Tours

If you like to read his opinion about these Sites, please check them out on his article by clicking here.

Finally, after hours and hours of research, I found an excellent post, provided by Mixtus Media on

How To Set Up A Successful Blog Tour + A FREE Guide

They not only provide us with an 11-step-guide on how to organize a Blog Tour, they as well provide us with a free Blog Tour Worksheet.

STEP 1: IDENTIFY YOUR IDEAL READER
STEP 2: RESEARCH
STEP 3: CREATE A LIST
STEP 4: DETERMINE YOUR RESOURCES
STEP 5: FIGURE OUT YOUR TIMEFRAME
STEP 6: CONTACT BLOGGERS
STEP 7: Stay ORGANIZED
STEP 8: CONSIDER GIVEAWAYS
STEP 9: ANNOUNCE THE TOUR
STEP 10: FOLLOW THROUGH WITH THE DELIVERY
STEP 11: FOLLOW UP

Each step is carefully described. To download the Worksheet, which I did, you are first subscribing to their newsletter. But I doubt that’s a problem. They do have more interesting information on their blog. (I didn’t have problems to download their worksheet, just in case your virus program is sensitive. Mine is, and it has carefully scanned the file and found nothing.)

After all the information I had found on Blog Tours I would love to hear from experienced writers how they had found it to organize their blog tours. Is it easy, is it hard? Do you mind providing us with some extra tips, tricks, and hints?

5 Tips To Get You Tweeting Like A Pro

Nicholas Rossis teaches us how to tweet like a pro. Thanks a lot, Nicholas!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Author Steve Boseley, who has posted on my blog a guest post on the best time to tweet, recently published a post filled with tips on how to compose the perfect Tweet. I’m copying here his main tips, but I urge you to check out his complete post if you’re using Twitter to promote your books, as he also has some great tips on Twitter etiquete.

Tip #1: People Are Looking For Bargains

Here is what people are looking for on Twitter:

Tweeting Tips | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Image via Steve Boseley

Notice a pattern? Yes, the two most popular items are discounts and promos, and free stuff!

Tip #2: Ask A Question

Phrasing your tweet is obviously paramount to its success. One remarkably successful way to increase interaction with a tweet is to phrase it as a question:

  • Why it is important to always…
  • Why you should never…
  • What is…

View original post 432 more words