AN EDITING TALE: EDITOR AND AUTHOR COACH CHRISTINA KAYE OF WRITE YOUR BEST BOOK

Posted by Victoria Strauss for Writer Beware®I first heard about editor and author coach Christina Kaye (aka Christina Broaddus) last year, via a writer who later posted this public complaint on Facebook. The allegations: misrepresentation of services (editing by a trainee rather than Christina herself), inadequate performance (the complainant paid for content editing, and got something more like copy editing), and refusal by Christina to either re-do the edit or provide a refund. 


In addition to the allegations, the complainant provided supporting documentation…including Christina’s furious emails and lawsuit threats when the complainant refused to back off.

As far as I know, the lawsuit never materialized.


So who is Christina Kaye? Owner of two-year-old editing and coaching service Write Your Best Book, her resume includes a predecessor, Top Shelf Editing, which launched in September 2019 and whose URL is currently set to re-direct to WYBB, as well as stints with Limitless Publishing (publisher of several of her novels) and Dragon Street Press


Other entrepreneurial ventures include Bon Chance Press, which started up in early 2017 and contracted several books before closing that same year; a registered business called Book Boss Boutique, LLC; and an Etsy storefront that sells writing-related planners and gifts. Christina also has a substantial presence on various social media platforms, hosts her own podcast, and has amassed a large following on TikTok.


The WYBB website displays testimonials from satisfied clients (of which there are apparently 300, or maybe it’s 150?). And a single bad review, even one as convincingly documented as the Facebook complaint, doesn’t necessarily indicate a problem business. Anyone can fly off the handle and say unwise things in response to pressure. Maybe this was an isolated incident? Maybe there was something else that explained Christina’s over-the-top response?  


Over the past year, however, several writers who’ve used Christina’s services have contacted me to report similar experiences: editing that didn’t fulfill what they were led to expect or the terms of the contracts they signed (such as copy editing presented as content editing, or editing by a trainee); hostile, threatening, insulting, and generally unprofessional responses by Christina to concerns and complaints (not just in email or texts but on social media); and refusal of refund requests, including in one case where services weren’t just unsatisfactory, but mostly weren’t delivered. 

CONTINUE READING HERE

5 Reasons Why You Should Register Your Copyright: Advice from the IBPA Advocacy Committee

The new Copyright Claims Board makes it more important than ever to officially register your copyright.

In December 2021, the U.S. Copyright Office will formally open its Copyright Claims Board, which will allow individual authors and small publishers an alternative to federal court for trying copyright infringement claims. In light of this, the IBPA Advocacy Committee thought it would be helpful to remind IBPA members of five reasons why they should formally register their works with the U.S. Copyright Office:

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Tricks and Traps of Using Real People’s Names in Your Writing – Written By Helen Sedwick

on The Book Designer:

Writers worry about using real people’s names in fiction. Even memoirists and nonfiction writers identify people by name and worry about the ramifications. Can writers model characters after real people and name names without getting sued?

Yes, they can, with some common sense limitations.

Over the next three posts I will talk about the legal risks of using real people in your writing; namely defamation, invasion of privacy, and misappropriation of the right of publicity. A thorough discussion of these issues would fill a bookcase, so don’t read these posts as the definitive word. My goal is to help you spot issues so you know when your need to learn more or seek expert advice.

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Does the Idea of Promoting Your Book Make You Feel Queasy? – Written By Lizbeth Meredith

on Jane Friedman site:

At every writer’s conference, I see fledgling authors roll up their sleeves when told well-established truths on writing:

Writing is important.

Make it a priority.

Schedule time for writing every day, or as regularly as possible.

But when they’re exhorted to market their books?

Pearl clutch.

While a small group of enthusiasts may swap tips between sessions, the attitude of far too many—especially authors who fancy themselves literary—is that the promo piece is unsavory. They’re too important, and drumming up their own book buzz feels beneath them. (“Isn’t that someone else’s job?”)

Or they’re too introverted. Too icked-out by the idea of becoming a self-promoter.

The problem? Their books join the other million-plus published annually that don’t find their forever home in the hands of the right readers.

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How Do You Divide Your Novel into Chapters? – Written By Ali Luke

on Aliventures:

Pick up the nearest book. Whether it’s fiction or non-fiction, it’s almost certainly split into chapters.

As readers, we take that for granted. Chapters give us an easy way to discuss where we’ve got to in a new book (“I’m on Chapter 10 now…”) – and provide handy stopping points in the text where we can put the book down.

As writers, though, chapters can be surprisingly tricky.

How many should you have? How long should they be? Do you even need chapters at all?

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The best ways to get author and book publicity – Written By Sandra Beckwith

on Build Book Buzz:

Publicity is that free media exposure you get when you’re quoted in the press. It could be an interview for a(n):

  • Magazine
  • Newspaper
  • Online media outlet or content site
  • Radio station
  • TV program
  • Blog
  • Podcast

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It’s more powerful than advertising and other paid-for marketing tactics because it brings with it far more credibility. That’s because when you’re quoted by the press, you get an authority boost.

People are smart enough to know that journalists are selective about who they use as sources. So, if a reporter chose you, you must know what you’re talking about.

What are the easiest and most effective ways to get publicity? Here are my top three.

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The Wound: How Pain Can Deepen Our Fiction – Written By Kristen Lamb

The wound is critical for creating dimensional characters and, thus layered stories. Ah, the masks we wear. We all have them because it’s impossible to be fully human and devoid of cracks.

We all have a wound. In fact if you make it past childhood you’re probably carrying around more than carry-on baggage (more than ONE wound). Yet, therein lies the conundrum for those who long to become writers. We’re all cracked, damaged, dinged yet simultaneously bombarded by countless conflicting messages.

It’s okay to cry, darling. Just next time wear the waterproof mascara. You’re a mess.

Many of us are the walking wounded, encouraged to embrace our flaws, experience all our emotions…but then cover them up because no one wants to see that. Jeez!

This ‘logic’ is absurd enough in life, but for authors we must choose the painful path if we hope to write the great stories, the ones that change people and endure. Perfect, flawless, normal and well-adjusted spell death for fiction. Superb stories provide a safe place for readers to ‘feel and heal’ and our job is to deliver that.

Yet, this comes at a price. I know! Always a catch.

CONTINUE READING HERE

Pacing Your Novel – Written By M.L. Davis

Pacing your novel – 5 essential tips

M.L. Davis

There is little worse than reading a story with poor pacing. Whether it’s too slow and dull, or everything happens in a blur, you’ll find a lack of enjoyment. The key is getting the pacing just right, building tension, revealing information, holding back secrets, and ensuring suspense while maintaining reader interest. With that in mind, here are some essential tips for pacing your novel.

Start with the action
Slow starts will get you nowhere. It can be tempting to open with world building, character descriptions, and thorough backgrounds, but these details won’t capture readers’ attention. Don’t get me wrong; you need to know these things. But you should start with the action, rather than the lead up to it. That way you pull the reader in at once.

CONTINUE READING HERE

What makes a great setting in a novel – Written By Nathan Bransford

One of the best parts of reading is the way books open up new worlds to us, whether a story is set in an unpronounceable ancient kingdom, the far reaches of outer space, ancient history, the distant future, or even the real world but maybe somewhere we’ve never been. It’s an incredible experience to be immersed in an unfamiliar setting.

Still, I’m not sure that all aspiring authors give quite enough thought to setting. The best worlds are more than just the trees that dot the hillsides or the stars in outer space.

Here are some of the most important elements in creating a memorable setting.

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Mute Point Or Moot Point And Why Your Decision Is Mooted – Written By Derek Haines

on Just Publishing Advice:

Is it a moot point or a mute point? The correct answer is a moot point.

We use the word mute to mean silent or unable to speak. You use a mute button to silence a television or computer.

But moot as an adjective means having little or no practical relevance. Moot can also mean something is subject to uncertainty, open to debate, or dispute.

When we say that a point is moot, we mean that an issue or fact is uncertain or irrelevant, but it is certainly not silent.

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