How To Republish A Book For Self-Published Authors – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines informs us in his article about how to republish a book for self-published authors. Thank you so very much for all your hard work, Derek!

________________________________________________________________

on Just Publishing Advice:

Can a self-published book be republished?

Yes, if you have self-published a book, you can update it at any time and as often as you like.

You can change, modify, merge, or improve your book for both ebook and print versions.

You can update the cover design, change your genre and category listings and fine-tune, or find new keyword listings.

In This Article

How to republish a book
The big advantage of self-publishing
It’s always possible to improve a book
Add images
Add links to an ebook
Check your formatting
Choose better categories and keywords
There is always room for improvement
Unpublish and republish
Summary

Continue reading HERE

How to show the emotions of non-viewpoint characters – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby published a fascinating article about the emotions of non-viewpoint characters and how to show them without screwing up. Thank you, Louise!

________________________________________________________________

Non-viewpoint characters have emotions too.

But how do we show them without head-hopping?

The answer lies in mastering observable behaviour.

Continue reading HERE

 

5 Ways A Timeline Helps You Write Your Novel – Written By M. L. Davis

M. L. Davis provides us with an excellent article about how a timeline helps us write our novel. We can find the post published on the ‘Uninspired Writers’ blog. Thank you, M. L. Davis

________________________________________________________________

Some writers are plotters. Others are pantsers. There’s no right way to do it. There are pros and cons to plotting, and it’s up to you to decide what works best. Personally, I’m a plotter. Typically, my plotting consists of a basic outline and little else. It worked for two novels. But on my third, I was struggling. I spent ages trying to figure out why my story wouldn’t work before it hit me. I’d not sussed out the timeline, not properly. And once I had, it changed everything. As such, I’m sharing 5 ways that a timeline helps you write your novel.

Figuring out backstory
Not all backstory needs to be written. I would even go as far as to say most backstory doesn’t need to be written. But as a writer, it’s helpful to know where things started for your characters. It’s important to know what happened before the events of the first chapter. This way, you know what to include and what to omit. It also enables you to add depth to your characters, as undoubtedly their past has shaped them.
Untitled design (45)

Avoiding plot holes
A number of things can cause plot holes, and time is definitely one of them. If your characters and their story are to be believable, then time must move in the way it should. Even if your fictional world has it’s own concept of time, you should adhere to the rules you set for it. Savvy readers are likely to pick up on things that don’t flow naturally.

CONTINUE READING HERE

How to create an EPUB or MOBI file in seconds. Ebook publishing for beginner writers – Written By Louise Harnby

For those of us who do have difficulties with the conversion of our stories into EPUB or MOBI files. Thank you very much for your informative post, Louise!


Here’s how to convert a Word document into EPUB or MOBI file format. This option certainly won’t be for everyone, but if it suits you, you can master it in seconds … and for free.

Many authors create their books directly in Microsoft Word because of its excellent suite of onboard styling tools and its compatibility with a range of plug-ins and add-ins (including macros). Pro editors love it for the same reasons.

​Once the writing, drafting, editing, and final revisions are complete, it’s time to publish. Is a Word file good enough for epublication? How about a DIY conversion to EPUB or MOBI? It depends on several factors:

  • Your freebie plans
  • Your budget
  • Your sales and distribution platform
  • The complexity of your interior design

Continue reading HERE

Unforced Errors—5 Ways Writers Stand Between Themselves And Success – Written By Ruth Harris…

Ruth Harris published a guest post on Anne R. Allen’s blog about how writers stand between themselves and success. Thank you for your very educational blog post, Ruth.


on Anne R. Allen:

A term used in scoring tennis, “unforced errors” are not caused by the actions of the player’s opponent, but they’re the responsibility of the player him/herself. S/he is caught wrong-footed, out of balance, unable to return the serve, incapable of making the winning shot.

The concept of unforced errors can also be usefully applied to writers. Unforced errors are the self-inflicted harm we do to ourselves.

Continue reading HERE

Everything you need to know about Social Media Tagging in 2020 – Written By Janice Wald

Social Media tagging gets more and more important, and we writers better get used to using it to our advantage. Thank you for your help, Janice Wald!


Did you realize tagging on social media was complex?

Why is social media tagging helpful for us?

Tagging on social media is a powerful practice.

Social media tagging has many benefits for you.

When you tag, you get the attention of influencers who

  • Might link to you and improve your SEO
  • Might let you guest post and increase your subscribers
  • Might reshare your posts and extend your reach
  • Make you look good and boost your credibility

According to the UK Domain blog, in 2019, tagging on social media resulted in a 56% boost in engagement. Those figures should be even higher now.

This post will explain how tags work on 5 social media sites: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Quora, and LinkedIn.

Continue reading HERE

 

The First Thing You Do Is Draw A Map – Guest Post On TSRA’s Blog – Written By Jaq D Hawkins

I found this fantastic blog post about building worlds and drawing maps on The Story Reading Ape’s blog. It’s a guest post, written by Jaq D Hawkins. What a very informative post. Thank you, Jaq.


I’ve been a Fantasy reader pretty much all of my life, but I’ve never been enamoured of maps. It isn’t that I have trouble reading them; I’ve travelled many real places relying on the navigation of accurate maps and find them very useful. However, a map of an imaginary place in the beginning of a new book is fairly meaningless to me until I’m well immersed in the story and the occasional glimpse back at the map at the front can provide perspective on where places relate to one another.

Even then, I’ve often held the opinion that lazy writing is what makes the image necessary, even though maps characterise the epic tales from such luminaries as J.R.R. Tolkien and George R.R. Martin.

CONTINUE READING HERE

The Legends Of Windemere – Charles Yallowitz – Physical Description Posts

Charles Yallowitz published two blog posts about the difficulties of physical descriptions on his ‘The Legends of Windemere’ blog. I decided both are worth sharing. And here they are. Thank you very much, Charles!


The Physical Description: A Necessary & Surprisingly Difficult Piece

I think we can take this for granted.  Physical descriptions come off a little like a ‘duh’ concept.  We need to know what our characters look like to some extent.  Otherwise, every reader gets their own visual with no similarities.  Not necessarily a bad thing until people begin fighting over it.  You also lose a dimension if you avoid it entirely.  Yes, we have a personality, actions, and words, but there can be a sense of lacking if we don’t have even a basic appearance.  This goes for places too, but we’re going to focus on characters for this week.  So, why is this?

Readers have these things called the five senses . . . Oh, that’s going too far back into the details.  We all know this.  We also know that an author should try very hard to hit as many of them as possible.  This is much easier…

CONTINUE READING HERE


Questions 3: How Do You Describe the Physical?

It’s been a week with a topic that was more difficult than I expected.  You would think doing a physical description is basic and easy.  It’s part of a foundation for a character and a story when your goal is to create an image in the reader’s head.  Everyone has their own opinion and strategy.  So, let’s not beat around the bush and end the week by opening the floor:

  1. How important is physical description to you as an author?
  2. What tip would you have for a new author struggling with this?
  3. What is the funniest thing you’ve done with a physical description?  (This can be accidental or on purpose. For me, it would be the switching eye color on Luke Callindor.)

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

5 Essential Book Promotion Tools For Every Author – Written By Derek Haines…

Derek Haines informs us about five essential book promotion tools for authors. Thank you so much for your helpful blog post, Derek!


on Just Publishing Advice:

For self-published authors, book promotion is always a challenge.

It takes time to plan your book marketing ideas before your book launch. Then you need to keep the buzz going after you publish a book.

There are many ways to market a book, yet for an indie author, the most critical factor is your time.

You want to get your book noticed by potential readers, but you don’t want to spend all your waking hours trying to sell your book.

In This Article

Time-saving book promotion tools

1. Publisher Rocket
2. Canva
3. SNAP Auto Poster
4. MailChimp
5. Kindlepreneur Book Description Generator

Continue reading HERE

 

5 tips for writing about physical pain in fiction – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby published a blog post that provides us with tips for writing about physical pain in fiction. I find this a very helpful post and decided to share it. Thank you, Louise!


 

Writing about pain is hard, but there’s no shame in that struggle; it’s difficult to articulate even when we’re experiencing it.

This post featured in Joel Friedlander’s
​Self-Publishing: The Carnival of the Indies #85

​​‘Pain is […] the kind of subjective and poorly delineated experience that is difficult to express satisfactorily in language […] Indeed, pain shares some of the characteristics of target domains that have received considerable attention in the cognitive linguistic literature. Like LOVE, for example, it is private, subjective […] cannot be directly observed,’ says linguist Elena Semino.

When researching this article, I was surprised by how little has been written about the art of depicting physical pain in fiction. And, yet, the act of hurting is prevalent in most genres; it deserves as much attention as emotional distress.

Continue reading HERE