The Dos and Don’ts of Self-Publishing A Book…

What a great article, written by Lorna Sixsmith. I found it on The Story Reading Ape’s blog which makes it easier for me to re-blog. It’s very informative and important to me, being a new author and still in the middle of a learning process.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Lorna Sixsmith  on the Write on Track site:

Self-publishing a book is hugely exciting and a great achievement.

While much of it is straightforward, it can be a scary prospect particularly if you are investing in printed copies in significant numbers.

Having just self-published my second book aimed at a farming readership, I found that I am still learning and yes, it is easy to make mistakes.

Here’s my list of things you should do and things you should either avoid or consider very carefully.

Find out more at:

The Dos and Don’ts

View original post

Advertisements

Titles – How Important Are They and How Do You Come Up With Them?

Author Don Massenzio informs us about title and how important they are. Thank you for this great article, Don!

Author Don Massenzio

Many authors who write book series, James Patterson, Janet Evanovich and Sue Grafton, to name a few, have written books that have common words in them. Patterson uses the word ‘Cross’, as in his character, Alex Cross, in such books as Cross My Heart, Cross Country, etc. Interestingly enough, however, he started out titling his Alex Cross books with nursery rhyme references like Along Came a Spider and Jack and Jill. 

Janet Evanovich uses numbers for her Stephanie Plum novels. She started with One for the Money and is about to release Hardcore Twenty Four. Sue Grafton used the more limiting letter scheme for her titles. Starting with A is for Alibi, she is now about to release Y is for Yesterday. Having titles like these for a series is a great marketing idea and, in the case of Evanovich and Grafton, it gives you an idea…

View original post 443 more words

Your Unique Author Picture – Research By A. J. Alexander

Picture courtesy of: http://gregceoblog.com

 

_______________________________________________________________________

 

I have been thinking about Author Pictures lately. I know very well what I have on my Social Media accounts right now isn’t a great thing to do. One of the main reasons for these overexposed profile pictures is the fact that I don’t like it to be on pictures. And from what I heard this can be seen in the picture.

 

No matter how often I’m told the pictures look great, and I’m supposed to be pretty, I don’t believe it. This does, in fact, have a psychological root which was planted in my childhood, but I think this is another subject and doesn’t belong here.

 

Now, since one day I will undoubtedly be published I will sooner or later have to think about my author picture, and that’s why I went for another round of research.

 

One of the first interesting and informative articles I found on Huffington Post where Heather Hummel talks about the relevance of a professional author photo. She not only talks about the quality of the picture but also shows certain problems that can come up and presents the respective solutions. For example, does she mention the expression on the picture, the quality, the background and presents some final thoughts. (Read the entire article here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/heather-hummel/the-relevance-of-a-profes_b_4498575.html)

 

By going on with my research, I found “The Review Review.” Written by Randy Susan Meyers the article “Look Great In Your Author Photo” gives you tips and tricks on colors, clothes, and makeup and also describes what you can do to hide certain flaws and how to choose your photographer. I thought it is a great helpful post who I would recommend reading when someone needs a (new) author photo. (To read the post click here: http://www.thereviewreview.net/publishing-tips/look-great-your-author-photo)

 

On the Author Media website, I found a fantastic post, written by author Thomas Umstattd. He clearly states that his article is not for the author, but for the photographer! And I think he did an amazing job. Even though being an author I learned a lot by reading his article, and I might even be able to show it to my future photographer if necessary, to show him what I need the picture for. The article is enormously useful to us ‘clients’ too! (It can be read here: http://www.authormedia.com/how-to-take-portraits-for-an-author-website/)

 

The last impressive article I found on “Book In A Box,” written by Tucker Max, Chairman & Co-Founder at Book In A Box. He shows what’s good and what’s bad and not just said, some pics are good or bad but also explains the reason in clear, simple words. He provides us with different examples and gives us great advice on what not to do and what he would recommend getting a great picture. I decided to provide you here with a small part of his article:

 

The Author Photo Rule That Rules Them All

Here’s the thing that makes author photos so hard to give advice about: There is not one “right” way to do it. Like I talked about above, the “right” way all depends on what you’re trying to achieve. But there is one overarching rule that you need to sear into your brain when it comes to author photos (or any profile photo):

Know what you want to say to what audience, and make sure you signal it properly.

This is the key to everything. The author photo for a CEO of a Fortune 500 company should be totally different from the author photo for an up-and-coming comedian. Why? Because they are signaling different things to different groups.
Generally speaking, the CEO’s author photo should signal professionalism, effectiveness, reliability, and trust. The comedian’s photo could be wacky, pensive, goofy or even serious, all depending on his comedic style and what he wanted to signal.

To read the full article go to http://bookinabox.com/blog/how-to-take-author-photo/

 

I have to say I learned a lot by reading these four articles, and I’m sure I’ll find a great photographer who helps me. But then, maybe I’ll just hide under a stone and rather provide the world with my stories than my face.

_______________________________________________________________________

Author James Jones
courtesy of: http://www.jamesjonesliterarysociety.org/

Writing a Novel – The Four Steps I Use

Thank you very much, Don Massenzio, for sharing the four steps you use to write a novel. This is very helpful for many of us beginners.

Author Don Massenzio

I am on the verge of publishing novels seven and eight of my writing career. I wouldn’t say that I’m anything close to being an expert, but I decided to use my Hurricane Irma downtime to look back on the books I’ve written and the process that I followed.

1-ideaStep 1 – The Premise

The premise is just a general idea of what a book will be about. I’m going to use my second novel, Let Me Be Frank, as the example for this post.

The premise for this book was simple. I had just binge watched the 1970s television show, Columbo, and I was intrigued by the structure of most of the episodes. The show almost always started with a murder and very often showed the murderer and the method used to do in the victim. It was then up to Lieutenant Columbo to solve the case and…

View original post 1,108 more words

37 Top Book Awards for Authors in 2017

Scott Lorenz, a Book Publicist, informs us about book awards for authors. Thank you very much Scott, this is very helpful.

The Book Publicist

Book Awards for Authors

Enter Book Award Contests and Become an Award Winning Author in 2017!

By Scott Lorenz

Westwind Communications

“Do book awards matter?”  YES!!

As a book publicist I can assure you they absolutely do matter! One client won several awards and was contacted by two movie producers about her Young Adult Sci-Fi Fantasy Fiction novel.  Another one of my clients won the prestigious Los Angeles Book Festival award. That then led to a flurry of media interest, which subsequently led to a major New York agent deciding to represent the book and pitch it to all the major publishing houses. This author, needless to say, was happy he decided to enter.

You win awards you sell more products.  Jeff Bezos, CEO Amazon

Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference (Photo news.techniblogic.com

Recently a business book client won a major award which caused CNN to reach out to request the book.

View original post 1,673 more words

How To Use ‘Press This’ On WordPress #bloggingtips

Hugh from ‘Hugh’s Views And News” shows us a step-by-step guide to use the “Press This” button on WordPress. Thank you so much Hugh. This is very helpful – and user-friendly. I really need to go through this carefully and try it out. It is phenomenal!

Hugh's Views & News

I stopped reblogging blog posts months ago. In fact, I wish I’d never started using the reblog button. Why? Because of the fantastic little feature WordPress call ‘Press This’. But, what is ‘Press This’, where can you find it, and how do you use it?

‘Press This’ is an alternative way to reblogging. It’s like reblogging a post, but you can do so much more with it than you can when using the reblog button. It does take a little more time to set up, but that’s because it’s more than just about pressing a button and then moving on. For quickness, reblogging a post is perfect. However, if like me you have made the most out of reblogging (click here to read the post) then you can easily make up the extra time it takes in setting up a ‘Press This’ share.

The ‘Press This’ button can be found…

View original post 880 more words

September/October 2017 Writing Contests

Thanks to Rachel Poli’s efforts we are updated once again on the upcoming September/October 2017 writing contests. Thank you so much Rachel!

Rachel Poli

September/October 2017 writing contest deadlinesSeptember 2017

Genre: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, or Poetry
Theme: None
Website: Still: The Journal
Deadline: September 9, 2017
Entry Fee: $12
Prize: First – $200

Genre: Essay
Theme: None
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: September 30, 2017
Entry Fee: $10/1 essay or $15/2 essays
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: My Crazy Family
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: September 30, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

October 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: (Early bird) October 2, 2017
Entry Fee: $15
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Popular fiction (romance, YA, thriller, crime, horror, sci-fi)
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: (Early bird) October 16, 2017
Entry Fee: $20
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Fiction
Theme: Short story (new writers only)
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: October 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $18
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Christmas and Holiday
Website: Chicken Soup for the…

View original post 66 more words