Language Generator for Fantasy and Sci-Fi

Kristen Twardowski informs us with an exciting blog post about “Vulgar”, a language generator for Sci-Fi and Fantasy writers. Thanks so much Kristen.

Kristen Twardowski

I’ve talked about my fascination with language before, but sometimes writers need a little help creating words that make sense in their nascent worlds. I recently found something that streamlines that process.

Vulgar (pardon the terrible name) is a constructed language generator. The generator creates fully realized languages; if you were truly ambitious you could learn some of them. The program attempts to mimic real languages, so there are patterns to the words that develop. For instance, in 50% of generated languages, the word for “tongue” is the same as the word for “language”, and words often share roots as is the case for:

pson /pʂon/ n. paint; v. paint
psopru /ˈpʂopru/ n. painter

I’ve played around with the generator quite a bit and am highlighting a few sample languages below.

Vulgar Zulia.JPG via Vulgar

Vulgar Nahis.JPG via Vulgar

The above screenshots simply capture the summaries for the languages. The full pages, however…

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A Simple Guide to Book Advances and Royalties

A Writer’s Path’ Ryan Lance has written a very informative and simple guide to book advances and royalties. Thank you very much!

A Writer's Path

by Gary Smailes

When a book publisher offers a book deal to a new author, the contract will talk about ‘advances’ and ‘royalties’. These can be a little confusing to new authors, though a little bit of knowledge will go a long way to helping you fully understand what you are being offered.

In this article, you will learn about royalties and advances, you will discover what is usual for a book publisher to offer and you will find out how the publishing world is changing the way it provides advances and royalties.

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Don’t Advertise With Amazon Until You’ve Read This

Nicholas C. Rossis has provided us with a fantastic blog post about advertising with Amazon. Read this article before you decide to do so. Thank you very much Nicholas!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Yes, this is the long-promised post where I share my experience advertising with Amazon and the things I’ve learned — things that could make or break your campaign.

What I’ve Learned Advertising With Amazon

You may remember my past experiences with Amazon Marketing Services (AMS) and the recent plan I’d set for myself. I started promoting in April with 3 kinds of ads:

Ad #1: Sponsored Products, Manual Keywords

This was the bulk of my promos. I chose up to 1,000 keywords for each book and used them to target potential readers.

How does one come up with so many keywords, you ask? Well, there are two easy ways:

Advertising with Amazon (AMS) | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books1. Choose The Best-Selling Books In Your Genre

The first strategy requires that you find the genres in which your books sells. Amazon does some automatic choosing for you, and you can sometimes see these listed under your book details…

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More Indie Publishing Tips

Don Massenzio is not only a great author; he’s an excellent advisor too! Thank you, for your very helpful and informative tips on indie publishing, Don!

Don Massenzio's Blog

TandEFor me, indie publishing has consisted of a lot of trial-and-error to determine what things work and what things do not. Unlike other types of sales and marketing, as an author it is not only about selling books, but, to some degree, you are selling yourself. This is something I’m extremely uncomfortable with, but I’ve found some ways to adjust my approach to make it more tolerable.

This list consists of some of the things I’ve tried that have worked for me. Your mileage may vary.

Hard sell concept.

  • Blatantly asking people to buy your books doesn’t work. Instead, I’ve tried to use my blog, Facebook, and other social media to try to convince people that my work might be worth checking out. I do this by trying to entertain or teach with the material I post.

wordofmouth

  • Word of mouth is extremely important. Your existing readers are your best salespeople. I like interacting with them…

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Throwback Thursday: How to Get Your Novel Made Into a Film

Ryan Lanz provides us with great information about what’s happening when our novel will get made into a film. Thank you Ryan.

A Writer's Path

Throwback Thursday is a series where we take a look back at some of AWP’s most popular posts. Enjoy!

by Gary Smailes

In this article you will discover the steps a novel must go through in order to be made into a film; you’ll gain a deeper understanding of the process and discover the elements that you, as an author, can control to have a positive impact on the chances of seeing your book on the big screen.

This article will focus on the period of time before filming begins, since this is when an author has the most impact on the project. Once the cameras start rolling, the author’s role lessens greatly.

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June/July 2017 Writing Contests

Thank you very much, Rachel Poli, for doing all the work and providing us with the writing contests for June and July 2017!

Rachel Poli

June/July 2017 Writing Contest DeadlinesJUNE 2017

Genre: Short Story Fiction (Unpublished writers only!)
Theme: N/A
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: June 30, 2017
Entry Fee: $18
Prize: First place – $2,500

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: My Crazy Family
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: June 30, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Short short fiction
Theme: N/A
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: June 30, 2017
Entry Fee: $10 (for up to 3 shorts)
Prize: First – $500

JULY 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Comstock Review
Deadline: July 1, 2017
Entry Fee: $5 (mail) | $25 (online)
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Poetry, Fiction, or Nonfiction
Theme: Mental health, the mind, the body, illness, etc.
Website: Bellevue Literary Review
Deadline: July 1, 2017
Entry Fee: $20
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: July 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $10/6 poems or $15/10 poems
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Poetry, Fiction

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Running YOUR Race—Be Content Yet Stay HUNGRY (by Kristen Lamb)

I re-blogged part of Kristen Lamb’s blog post here. She writes about allies and enemies. An aspect of our writer’s life, all of us, should be aware of.

Thank you, Kristen!!

 

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My goal for this blog has always, always, always been to be honest with you guys, to offer tough love and guidance and support. Because the world has three kinds of people, but two are the most common. Two are not exactly helpful and can be downright toxic. We will start with these folks, then move on to how to win that race!

The Discourager (Enemy)

This is the person who’s going to tell you what you’re unable to do. That it’s too hard, that you’re stupid for even trying.
You want to be a successful author? Seriously? Everyone can be published. It means nothing. Do you have any idea the competition that’s out there? You need a mega-marketing budget and even then you’ll probably fail.
Okay I need to stop there because I’m depressing myself.

 

TO CONTINUE READ HERE:

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/05/running-your-race-be-content-yet-stay-hungry/#respond