The Reason Shame is the Beating Heart of All Great Stories – written by Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb published a phenomenal blog post about her taste and the reason shame is the beating heart of all great stories. I admire her knowledge and her willingness to share it. Thank you, Kirsten!

 

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I read a ridiculous amount of novels and I’m very picky, namely because I have the attention span of a fruit fly with a crack habit. Like most modern readers, it takes a lot to grab then keep my attention.

Most books I end up putting down or returning to Audible for another. There are books I finish then forget. Most are meh. Good way to kill time not much more. But then there are the ones that stick, the stories I never grow tired of reading and rereading and recommending and as you can see, I have very eclectic taste.

Some of my fondest loves are Heart-Shaped Box, Big, Little Lies, American Gods, Prisoner of Hell Gate, The Joy Luck Club, Luckiest Girl Alive, the Harry Bosch series by Michael Connelly, The Lincoln Lawyer, and anything written by Fredik Backman Britt Marie Was Here being my favorite.

Yet what do all these great stories have in common? Why do they make me laugh and cry and cheer? What is so cathartic about these books?

 

To continue reading Kristen Lambs post, please go to her blog by clicking the link below:

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/07/the-reason-shame-is-the-beating-heart-of-all-great-stories/

 

The Truth Behind Popular Copyright Myths – written by Susan Spann

The Story Reading Ape made sure that I read this blog post, written by Susan Spann of “Writer Unboxed”. I found it informative, interesting and very helpful and couldn’t resist making sure that word is spread about this blog post. Thank you, Susan Spann!

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Copyright law can seem confusing, but authors need to know the basics—especially when (and whether) to register a copyright, and what to do when using a pseudonym. As a publishing lawyer, I work with copyright issues (and authors) all the time, and today, I thought I’d take a closer look at some popular myths about copyright law and how it applies to novels and other creative works.*

Myth #1: You have to register copyright in order to own the copyright in your work.

False. Registration with the U.S. Copyright Office is not a legal requirement for copyright ownership. Copyright attaches to “qualifying works**” automatically at the time of their creation. However, copyright registration is generally required in order to file a lawsuit against infringers, and to claim certain benefits under the U.S Copyright Act, so authors should register copyright within three months of a work’s initial publication.

(**Short stories, novellas, novels, anthologies, poetry, and similar fiction and non-fiction works all generally qualify for copyright protection.)

 Myth #2: Authors benefit from copyright registration.

 

To read the entire article, please go to:

http://writerunboxed.com/2017/06/26/the-truth-behind-popular-copyright-myths/

The Creative Benefits Of Being Bored – written by Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb, one of our favorite teachers, provided us with an enormously impressive post about the creative benefits of being bored. I have to admit, I’d recommend it to everyone. Read it, and take out of it what you need. Thank you, Kristen!

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Hey everyone! Remember me? It’s Kristen and I’m back and yes of course I missed all of you dearly. In this blog, I’ve always worked to be transparent with you guys so you knew it was okay to be human. Lately, I’ve been very very human as in seriously exhausted and burned out. Working is easy for me. Resting?

That requires an intervention.

Hey, I’m a work in progress too! 😛

I’m bad about having two speeds, GO and GO HARDER. Three years ago I pushed and pushed until I ended up with a nice case of Shingles that laid me out for months.

Yeah nothing to make a gal feel young and sexy like Shingles.

One would think I learned from that. Sigh. No *hangs head in shame* So I’ve been going going going for months. Launched a debut book, blogging, teaching then went to present at a week-long retreat…where I worked 10-12 hour days. I LOVE my work. Sitting alone in the woods in the quiet? When there are writers I can HELP??????

 

To continue reading the entire blog post, please click:

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/07/the-creative-benefits-of-being-bored/

 

 

July/August 2017 Writing Contests

Thank you very much for all your efforts and work, Rachel Poli. We appreciate it!

Rachel Poli

Writing Contests for July and August 2017

JULY 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: July 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $10/6 poems or $15/10 poems
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Poetry, Fiction
Theme: Fairy Tale
Website: Fairy Tale Review
Deadline: July 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $10
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Fiction
Theme: Flash Fiction
Website: Gigantic Sequins
Deadline: July 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $5
Prize: $100

Genre: Any
Theme: “The End”
Website: Visible Ink
Deadline: July 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $7
Prize: $75

Genre: Flash Fiction
Theme: N/A
Website: The Golden Key
Deadline: July 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $4
Prize: $150

Genre: Fiction (New writers only)
Theme: N/A
Website: The Masters Review
Deadline: July 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $20
Prize: First – $3,000

AUGUST 2017

Genre: Fiction/Non-Fiction
Theme: Self-published ebooks
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: August 1, 2017
Entry Fee: $99
Prize: Grand – $5,000

Genre: Flash Fiction/Non-Fiction/Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Blue Earth Review
Deadline:…

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Language Generator for Fantasy and Sci-Fi

Kristen Twardowski informs us with an exciting blog post about “Vulgar”, a language generator for Sci-Fi and Fantasy writers. Thanks so much Kristen.

Kristen Twardowski

I’ve talked about my fascination with language before, but sometimes writers need a little help creating words that make sense in their nascent worlds. I recently found something that streamlines that process.

Vulgar (pardon the terrible name) is a constructed language generator. The generator creates fully realized languages; if you were truly ambitious you could learn some of them. The program attempts to mimic real languages, so there are patterns to the words that develop. For instance, in 50% of generated languages, the word for “tongue” is the same as the word for “language”, and words often share roots as is the case for:

pson /pʂon/ n. paint; v. paint
psopru /ˈpʂopru/ n. painter

I’ve played around with the generator quite a bit and am highlighting a few sample languages below.

Vulgar Zulia.JPG via Vulgar

Vulgar Nahis.JPG via Vulgar

The above screenshots simply capture the summaries for the languages. The full pages, however…

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A Simple Guide to Book Advances and Royalties

A Writer’s Path’ Ryan Lance has written a very informative and simple guide to book advances and royalties. Thank you very much!

A Writer's Path

by Gary Smailes

When a book publisher offers a book deal to a new author, the contract will talk about ‘advances’ and ‘royalties’. These can be a little confusing to new authors, though a little bit of knowledge will go a long way to helping you fully understand what you are being offered.

In this article, you will learn about royalties and advances, you will discover what is usual for a book publisher to offer and you will find out how the publishing world is changing the way it provides advances and royalties.

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Don’t Advertise With Amazon Until You’ve Read This

Nicholas C. Rossis has provided us with a fantastic blog post about advertising with Amazon. Read this article before you decide to do so. Thank you very much Nicholas!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Yes, this is the long-promised post where I share my experience advertising with Amazon and the things I’ve learned — things that could make or break your campaign.

What I’ve Learned Advertising With Amazon

You may remember my past experiences with Amazon Marketing Services (AMS) and the recent plan I’d set for myself. I started promoting in April with 3 kinds of ads:

Ad #1: Sponsored Products, Manual Keywords

This was the bulk of my promos. I chose up to 1,000 keywords for each book and used them to target potential readers.

How does one come up with so many keywords, you ask? Well, there are two easy ways:

Advertising with Amazon (AMS) | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books1. Choose The Best-Selling Books In Your Genre

The first strategy requires that you find the genres in which your books sells. Amazon does some automatic choosing for you, and you can sometimes see these listed under your book details…

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