How To Use LinkedIn ProFinder

I am getting ready. Step by slow step I’m getting ready to be published. (And please, remember the word ‘slowly.’)

I have a cover for the first book, even though it’s still not completely edited. But I hope that will soon be done too. Now I know I need help for the next step. After not getting along anymore with my once hired copyright lawyer, I decided to pick a new, trustworthy copyright lawyer who can help me with his knowledge. Easier said than done. Where do I find one? And believe me, I didn’t feel like going through the phone book.

That was when I remembered that I have one of the worldwide most used professional networks available. I was sure it could help me… And it was so easy!

First I used the ‘search’ function on LinkedIn and entered “Copyright lawyer”:

 

LinkedIn showed me two lawyers AND on top, the hint to ProFinder with the button “Get free proposals”. I wasn’t happy with neither one of the shown lawyers and decided to click the ‘free proposals’-button.

 

It took me right to


 

Of course I had to answer a few questions, which I did:

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At the very end, all I had to do was clicking the “Get free proposals” and wait. It didn’t take too long I got a reply from a copyright lawyer in my neighborhood who I contacted back. We chatted, then talked for a bit on the phone – and I’ll visit him soon to complete the documents and agreement between lawyer and client.

I got what I needed. And I’m sure I’ll be using ProFinder again. It’s very easy.

 

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The Origins Of English

Nicholas C. Rossis published a phenomenal article about the origins of English. Thanks so much, Nicholas. This is exciting!

Nicholas C. Rossis

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators. Educator Claire Bowern and Director Patrick Smith have produced a great little film that explains the origins of English. As they explain, when we talk about ‘English’, we often think of it as a single language. But what do the dialects spoken in dozens of countries around the world have in common with each other, or with the writings of Chaucer? The Origins Of English traces the language from the present day back to its ancient roots, showing how English has evolved through generations of speakers.

Going Further Back

However, illustrator Minna Sundberg went even further back. She has captured in an elegant infographic a linguistic tree which reveals some fascinating links between different tongues, illustrating how most of the different languages we speak today can actually be placed in only a couple of groups by their…

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Different Types of Closure

Charles Yallowitz provides us with a post on his blog “Legends of Windermere”, describing different types of closure. I love the article. Thank you, Charles.

Legends of Windemere

Yahoo Image Search

I’ve said in previous posts that one of the most important parts of concluding a series is creating closure. You need to bring things to an end, which isn’t as easy as some people think.  In fact, one of the reasons it can be so tough is because you have a variety of closure types to choose from.  It depends a lot on what you’re going for, but even planning doesn’t alleviate all the pressure.  So, what are the types?

  1. Classic Good Ending– All of the good guys get what they wanted and all of the bad guys got what they deserved.  It’s the oldest type of closure in the book.  Nothing messy and no risk of people feeling it’s a downer.  Though, you might get called out for being weak and unoriginal.
  2. Classic Bad Ending– I’m not sure how long it took for someone…

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Blogger Tip 02 – How to Reduce the Number of Images Required in Your WordPress Media and SAVE STORAGE SPACE…

Need to save more storage? See what else you can do to limit the space used up by your images. Thanks so much for the tips, Chris, The Story Reading Ape!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

WP TIP 1

If you use more than one image in your posts, then use WordPress Publicize to automatically upload your post to Twitter, Facebook, etc, or, manually upload them, the image last inserted into your post, is the one that will be displayed on your media.

To avoid the wrong image being displayed, either:

Insert it LAST

OR

Select it as your ‘Featured Image’

Authors especially would probably prefer their Book Cover being displayed, rather than some other, random, image.

WP TIP 2

If you opt for using a Featured image, or, have the same image appear more than once in your post (as I’ve done on this post):

You DO NOT NEED to upload the same image for each separate appearance!

Select the same image to be inserted wherever you want it to be shown in the post.

This will save taking up unnecessary space in your media…

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Blogger Tip 01 – How to Resize Images inside your WordPress Media and SAVE STORAGE SPACE..

Phenomenal! On The Story Reading Ape’s blog I found blogger tip #1 to save storage space when it comes to our pictures. It’s a really important post to read for our very busy bloggers. Thank you, Chris!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Have you been using images that are VERY LARGE, and/or, PNG Format?

Have you been reblogging and noticed how LARGE, some folks make their images?

Result

Running out of space in your WordPress Media Storage and thinking about paying for more?

Unless you are displaying your own images / photos, and WANT to have them full size

Before you spend any money, go through your Media Storage images and reduce their sizes

You might be shocked at how much longer you can work with the storage space you save.

Step 1:

Select an image and click on it to see it’s size (width x height in pixels)

and

how much it ‘weighs’ (i.e., how many KB or MB it is):

Step 2

My example has already been adjusted, but you can see it’s size and weight

To reduce them, click on the Edit Image button shown under the image:

Step…

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Chapters Indigo Announce That They Plan to Enter the US Market!

I found this article, written by Amy Collins, over at The Story Reading Ape’s blog. This is amazing news!
Thank you Chris and Amy for spreading word about this.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Amy Collins  in The Book Designer Magazine 

This is big guys….

While Barnes & Noble, the largest chain bookstore in the United States, has been struggling, Canada’s largest bookseller, Indigo Books & Music, announced plans to expand into the United States for the first time, starting with the Mall at Short Hills in New Jersey, in the summer of 2018.

Currently, Indigo runs 89 superstores under the names Indigo and Chapters, plus 122 smaller stores under the names Coles, Indigospirit, SmithBooks, and The Book Company.

Unlike B&N, Indigo’s online sales grew 15 percent last year, and in the Canadian ebook market, Kobo outsells Amazon.

See the Indigo Q2 Report HERE

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How to Tailor Your Resume — Tips for Writers

Nicholas Rossis with an interesting and helpful post about writer’s resumes. Thank you, Nicholas!

 

Nicholas C. Rossis

Victoria Sawtelle | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book

This is the second part of a 3-part series dealing with alternative ways of making a living through writing. Victoria Sawtelle is a community manager at Uptowork – a career blog with +1.5 million monthly readers. I agreed to share this guest post because they have created an amazingly detailed guide on how to make a writer’s resume, with over 30 examples and detailed, step-by-step instructions. Uptowork has kindly agreed to offer my readers free access to their resume builder, so if anyone’s interested, use the free trial code ZgyI50xW.

How to Tailor Your Resume — Tips for Writers

Ghostwriting | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Image: rainbowriting.com

You’re a writer.

You’ve written copy for newsletters, popular guides for blogs, and insightful articles for news outlets.

You’ve rewritten more buzzword-loving execs you care to count.

Ghostwriting? Been there, done that.

Plus, there’s that novel you’re working on.

You can write it all—

But for an…

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