4 UK Agents Seeking Crime Fiction, Nonfiction, SFF, Literary Fiction, Memoir and more – Written By Erica Verrillo

Erica Verillo, thank you for providing us with the names and information of four UK agents seeking our work! We really appreciate it!

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on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are four UK agents expanding their client lists.

Mark “Stan” Stanton is always on the lookout for new crime writers. He is actively searching for new novelists and non-fiction projects.

Jamie Cowen is looking for genre fiction of all kinds, including crime, thrillers, SF, fantasy and horror, and all fiction for young adults. He is also looking for sport-related non-fiction, and commercial narrative non-fiction, and is keen to see submissions of all genres from BAME and LGBTQ writers.

Julian Alexander represents fiction and nonfiction of all kinds, from history and medicine, heartwarming memoir, to illustrated books, to edgy detective novels and fast paced thrillers.

John Ash is seeking literary fiction, ambitious fantasy, and anything with a dark vein of humour running through it. On the non-fiction side, he loves to read literary and unusual narrative non-fiction and memoir, and is especially interested in writing on music, cultural history, nature and art.

Always check the agency website and agent bio before submitting. Agents can switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change.

Get Full Details HERE

7 Misconceptions About Being a Writer – Written By K.M. Weiland…

K. M. Weiland provides us with a blog post describing misconceptions about being a writer. Thank you very much, K. M. Weiland!

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on Helping Writers become Authors:

Like any good story, the writing life is a tale of deceptive depth.

At first glance, it offers up a shiny, artsy, fun cover. Become a Writer! its title beckons, and its first chapters lure us in by fulfilling all these initial promises.

But the deeper we get, the further we go, the more we realize there’s more to this story than meets the eye.

There’s more adventure, more conflict, more drama, and more comedy than we could ever have realized.

In short, there are many different misconceptions about being a writer.

Continue reading HERE

What to write when you can’t “write what you know.” – Written By AdminBD…

AdminBD provides us with a few good tips and hints on Anne R. Allen’s blog. Thank you very much for this great article.

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on Anne R. Allen:

One of the primo, Number One “rules” for writers is write what you know.

Writing what you know is generally excellent advice for writers who are in the early stages of their careers. Knowing your setting — whether it’s geographical, professional,  familial, is one less issue you’ll have to face when you’re still not yet completely comfortable with fiction’s basic craft elements — narrative, backstory, plot, dialogue, character.

But—

What if you can’t — or don’t want to — write what you know?

Because —

Continue reading HERE

How To Republish A Book For Self-Published Authors – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines informs us in his article about how to republish a book for self-published authors. Thank you so very much for all your hard work, Derek!

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on Just Publishing Advice:

Can a self-published book be republished?

Yes, if you have self-published a book, you can update it at any time and as often as you like.

You can change, modify, merge, or improve your book for both ebook and print versions.

You can update the cover design, change your genre and category listings and fine-tune, or find new keyword listings.

In This Article

How to republish a book
The big advantage of self-publishing
It’s always possible to improve a book
Add images
Add links to an ebook
Check your formatting
Choose better categories and keywords
There is always room for improvement
Unpublish and republish
Summary

Continue reading HERE

How to show the emotions of non-viewpoint characters – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby published a fascinating article about the emotions of non-viewpoint characters and how to show them without screwing up. Thank you, Louise!

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Non-viewpoint characters have emotions too.

But how do we show them without head-hopping?

The answer lies in mastering observable behaviour.

Continue reading HERE

 

5 Ways A Timeline Helps You Write Your Novel – Written By M. L. Davis

M. L. Davis provides us with an excellent article about how a timeline helps us write our novel. We can find the post published on the ‘Uninspired Writers’ blog. Thank you, M. L. Davis

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Some writers are plotters. Others are pantsers. There’s no right way to do it. There are pros and cons to plotting, and it’s up to you to decide what works best. Personally, I’m a plotter. Typically, my plotting consists of a basic outline and little else. It worked for two novels. But on my third, I was struggling. I spent ages trying to figure out why my story wouldn’t work before it hit me. I’d not sussed out the timeline, not properly. And once I had, it changed everything. As such, I’m sharing 5 ways that a timeline helps you write your novel.

Figuring out backstory
Not all backstory needs to be written. I would even go as far as to say most backstory doesn’t need to be written. But as a writer, it’s helpful to know where things started for your characters. It’s important to know what happened before the events of the first chapter. This way, you know what to include and what to omit. It also enables you to add depth to your characters, as undoubtedly their past has shaped them.
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Avoiding plot holes
A number of things can cause plot holes, and time is definitely one of them. If your characters and their story are to be believable, then time must move in the way it should. Even if your fictional world has it’s own concept of time, you should adhere to the rules you set for it. Savvy readers are likely to pick up on things that don’t flow naturally.

CONTINUE READING HERE

How to create an EPUB or MOBI file in seconds. Ebook publishing for beginner writers – Written By Louise Harnby

For those of us who do have difficulties with the conversion of our stories into EPUB or MOBI files. Thank you very much for your informative post, Louise!


Here’s how to convert a Word document into EPUB or MOBI file format. This option certainly won’t be for everyone, but if it suits you, you can master it in seconds … and for free.

Many authors create their books directly in Microsoft Word because of its excellent suite of onboard styling tools and its compatibility with a range of plug-ins and add-ins (including macros). Pro editors love it for the same reasons.

​Once the writing, drafting, editing, and final revisions are complete, it’s time to publish. Is a Word file good enough for epublication? How about a DIY conversion to EPUB or MOBI? It depends on several factors:

  • Your freebie plans
  • Your budget
  • Your sales and distribution platform
  • The complexity of your interior design

Continue reading HERE

Unforced Errors—5 Ways Writers Stand Between Themselves And Success – Written By Ruth Harris…

Ruth Harris published a guest post on Anne R. Allen’s blog about how writers stand between themselves and success. Thank you for your very educational blog post, Ruth.


on Anne R. Allen:

A term used in scoring tennis, “unforced errors” are not caused by the actions of the player’s opponent, but they’re the responsibility of the player him/herself. S/he is caught wrong-footed, out of balance, unable to return the serve, incapable of making the winning shot.

The concept of unforced errors can also be usefully applied to writers. Unforced errors are the self-inflicted harm we do to ourselves.

Continue reading HERE

Everything you need to know about Social Media Tagging in 2020 – Written By Janice Wald

Social Media tagging gets more and more important, and we writers better get used to using it to our advantage. Thank you for your help, Janice Wald!


Did you realize tagging on social media was complex?

Why is social media tagging helpful for us?

Tagging on social media is a powerful practice.

Social media tagging has many benefits for you.

When you tag, you get the attention of influencers who

  • Might link to you and improve your SEO
  • Might let you guest post and increase your subscribers
  • Might reshare your posts and extend your reach
  • Make you look good and boost your credibility

According to the UK Domain blog, in 2019, tagging on social media resulted in a 56% boost in engagement. Those figures should be even higher now.

This post will explain how tags work on 5 social media sites: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Quora, and LinkedIn.

Continue reading HERE

 

The First Thing You Do Is Draw A Map – Guest Post On TSRA’s Blog – Written By Jaq D Hawkins

I found this fantastic blog post about building worlds and drawing maps on The Story Reading Ape’s blog. It’s a guest post, written by Jaq D Hawkins. What a very informative post. Thank you, Jaq.


I’ve been a Fantasy reader pretty much all of my life, but I’ve never been enamoured of maps. It isn’t that I have trouble reading them; I’ve travelled many real places relying on the navigation of accurate maps and find them very useful. However, a map of an imaginary place in the beginning of a new book is fairly meaningless to me until I’m well immersed in the story and the occasional glimpse back at the map at the front can provide perspective on where places relate to one another.

Even then, I’ve often held the opinion that lazy writing is what makes the image necessary, even though maps characterise the epic tales from such luminaries as J.R.R. Tolkien and George R.R. Martin.

CONTINUE READING HERE