Life And Weather

Picture courtesy of Google.com

When I read that quote it didn’t go out of my head for quite some time. The quote made me realize that currently I am forced to dance in the rain. I could imagine to many people this quote means many things. To me, currently, it means to live one of my strengths: resilience. I have to adjust to the difficulties that life challenges us with at times.

What, if we were spoiled at all times, never challenged, nothing ever changes? Besides being bored, wouldn’t we forget how to be grateful for what we have; for the comfortability in our life? I think, sometimes we need a ‘rainy day’, or overcast, otherwise we couldn’t appreciate the sunshine anymore.

Going through rough times doesn’t mean ‘giving up’, or being forced to give up. It means, fighting for what we had, what we want, what we desire to have, or have back. Sure, I could have sat there and hoped the ‘storm would pass’. But I didn’t know what would be after the storm: would the sunshine be back? Or would there be a flood, and I’d be forced to swim, after having lost everything?

After everything that floated into my direction, I found it made more sense to learn how to dance in the rain. And that’s when I decided to read the ‘signs’ life showed me… the bad weather forecast, so to speak, and start swimming into a new direction… I am going to dance in the rain for a while, and then I will see, where the sunshine is going to lead me, and what miracles and wonders it will show me in the future.

I look forward to meeting you by the one or other puddle, or, maybe, somewhere soon, when I will see the sunbeams.


Picture courtesy of Google.com

Vivian Greene is a visionary, artist, author and entrepreneur who spreads her messages of greater love and awareness to everyone on the planet.

Her intrinsic values are recognized by business moguls who seek her advice and major corporations who are encouraged to balance the highest good with the bottom line.

Vivian also enables artists, authors, photographers, speakers and visionaries to serve others and prosper by turning their works into inspiring products. This is your chance to dance in the rain with her and see this world be the best it can be: http://www.viviangreene.com

The Occasional Bad Day – And Taking It With Humor


I knew today wouldn’t be my best day ever. I had to face a few quite hard facts. I was behind everything, but in particular, I was delayed on a few things I had to do – and should have done quite a while ago.

After waking up with a hammering headache, the prospect of getting something done that I had secretly postponed day-by-day-by-week wasn’t compelling. However, I knew it was time to get it done and over with. I was still within ‘the deadline’, but I was definitely on the ‘late’ side, which I don’t like. But so far, everything else has seemed to be more intriguing than sitting down and getting that stuff done.

But a deadline is a deadline is a deadline. And yes, Douglas Adams has something to say about deadlines:

“I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.” ~Douglas Adams

I knew I couldn’t wait until that deadline flew by and moved over to my office. On the way, I stumbled over Charlet, my black tabby cat, who decided to cross my path just as I surrounded the corner from the living room to the office.

Thank God I could catch myself and didn’t fall, but in my haste to see myself, I hit two fingers on my desk, and one of my fingernails folded over – backward. Now, if you have nails as hard as mine, that hurts! I howled like a hungry wolf on a full moon. But that was no reason to delay. However, it was a reason to go back to the kitchen, get me a glass of buttermilk and wait until the pain had lessened a bit. Unfortunately, from yesterday to today, the buttermilk in question has gone sour.

Well, I got myself apple juice and shuffled back to the office.

Then I sat down and worked intensely for five hours to get my task done. That worked fine… until I found out that this wasn’t the only task I had. I promised to record something and send it out – which I did too. Two jobs are done. And I had to write a blog post for tomorrow, which I am doing right now, three tasks done.

I had to go to the bathroom in between, which I didn’t bother to slip into my house shoes, and stepped with my bare feet into a cat hairball… what a mess!

When I returned, I found out I had not finished the September Newsletter yet, which means, instead of getting ready for bed, I’ll get ready to get that done as well.

After all, it wasn’t a perfect day for me today. When I surfed through some quotes for this post, I found that quote from English author Douglas Adams and laughed loudly.

I know precisely, my day could have been much worse! There are people with horrible problems! (Even though I do have a few things that cause me stress and anxiety…)  But this quote made me laugh, and only the laughter made me feel better!

And I remember that very often, laughter can help. Look for something to giggle, for something to laugh about, look for a movie, a quote, a memory, or a couple of kitties, that tickly your humor center – and you will survive!

And with that, I’ll let you read a few more giggles from Douglas Adams. Giggle – and feel good about it!


Douglas Noel Adams was born on the 11th of March 1952 in Cambridge. He was an English writer and dramatist. Adams went to Brentwood School in Essex from 1959 to 1970. Until then his interest lied more towards Science rather than Arts. It was not until the age of ten when after achieving a full score in an essay, his teacher Frank Halford, encouraged him to follow a career in writing. While Adams was studying in Cambridge he hitchhiked from Europe to Istanbul, working various jobs to generate funds for it. After he left school in 1970 to follow his career as a writer, Adams was certain that success was eminent. However, the truth was far from this. After being discovered by Graham Chapman and John Lloyd he also made brief experiences in the series ‘Monty Pythons Flying Circus’. But Adams writings were not aligned with the style of radio or television of that time which proved to be a great hindrance in his success.

To make a living Adams tried several jobs including hospital porter, barn builder, bodyguard and chicken shed cleaner. Nevertheless Adams continued his efforts, though few of his works were accepted. In 1976, however, his career escalated a little when he wrote and performed ‘Unpleasantness at Brodie’s Close’ in a festival. But by the end of the year, he was in strife again. This left Adams with great depression and low self esteem. Slowly he learned to cope with his situation and decided to keep working hard for success.

His early works include ‘The Burkiss Way’ (1977) and ‘The News Huddlines’. In the same year later he worked once again with Graham Chappal to write an episode of ‘Doctor on the Go’. Adams most notable work is ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ which reached immense heights of success with the book being the number one seller in UK. He also became the youngest author to have received the Golden Pen Award for his book. ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ moved on to become a television series, a record album, a computer game and also theatrical plays. In 1980 he wrote another successful book ‘The Restaurant at the End of the Universe’ followed by ‘The Universe and Everything’ in 1982 and ‘So Long and Thanks for All the Fish’ in 1984 and ‘Mostly Harmless’ in 2002. Douglas Adams sold more than fifteen million books in United Kingdom, The United States and Australia and was a best seller in many languages including German and Swedish.

His works received many awards some of which are the ‘Imperial Tobacco Award’ (1978), Sony Award (1979) and ‘Best Program for Young People’ Society of Authors/Pye Awards for Radio (1980). In 1982, three of Adams books made it to the New York Times bestseller list and the Publishers’ Weekly bestseller list making him the first British author to achieve this target after Ian Fleming. His phenomenal book ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy’ was at the 24th number in the Waterstone’s Books and Channel list of the 100 greatest books of the century.

Douglas Adams died in Santa Barbara, California in May 2001.


All pictures in this post are courtesy of Google.com

Inspiration – Fellow Writers, Where Do You Find Yours? – Written By Don Massenzio

On Don Massenzio’s blog, I found an extended and very interesting post about inspiration. I’m generally fascinated to hear where experienced writers like Don Massenzio, author of the Frank Rozzani-series, got their inspiration from. In this article, Don informs us about different ways inspiration came to him. Thank you very much, Don!


It is a great day to start something big – motivational handwriting on a napkin with a cup of coffee

 

2020 – The Year Without Writing Inspiration

2021 is a year full of possibilities. I keep telling myself this over and over.

The pandemic caused me to pause my creative writing for a number of months. The reasons for the lull in my literary creativity are many, but I’d like to believe that most of them are under control or behind me at this point.

As I look for inspiration to jumpstart my writing and to ignite the fire to finish my next book, I decided to go back to those things that inspired me in the past.

I thought I would share these inspirational elements with you to help you find inspiration and invite you to share those things that inspire you to write when you have a lull in your creativity.

Here are the things that have worked for me:

CONTINUE READING HERE

Writing Is Magic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When I was looking for inspirational quotes for writers,  I did not start searching for ‘Stephen King’ quotes in the first place. Of course, he is an amazing writer. I love some of his books. Later on in my life, I quit reading horror books. I loved each book of him that I read. But I admit, looking for a calm, inspirational ‘soft’ quote, and finding one that is almost ‘romantic’ from Stephen King, made me realize I ‘horribly’ underestimated him, pun intended.

And here it was, ‘speaking’ to me! You can, You should, and if You’re brave enough to start, You will. Writing is Magic.

I know I’m a wimp, but these three words almost made me cry. Yes, writing is magic! Or at least it is for me! I’m not necessarily talking about the fact that I write fantasy. I’m talking about the process of writing. When I take my pen and set it on the paper to watch the words flowing out of it, watch the ink forming the words that become a story, then I feel like I’m in a magical land, where I can hide. And yes, there is a lot to hide from. The current times, the situation, certain problems… whatever is happening… when I write, it is forgotten, for a certain time. When I write, I drink the water of life, as King describes it… and I’m happy.

Writing is art, writing is creative, writing is a place I can go where the magic happens. And the result is characters, places, stories, and books. That’s the place I want to be.

Thank you, Stephen King, for this wonderful emotional inspiration!


 

I don’t think Stephen King needs much of an introduction on a writer’s blog. He is, who he is, an inspiration to many of us! I, therefore, just picked a short description of who he is. Please click the ‘source’ link below if you would like to read more about him.

Picture courtesy of Google.com

Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of horrorsupernatural fiction, suspense, crime, science-fiction, and fantasy novels. His books have sold more than 350 million copies,[2] and many have been adapted into films, television series, miniseries, and comic books. King has published 61 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman, and five non-fiction books.[3] He has also written approximately 200 short stories, most of which have been published in book collections.[4][5]

King has received Bram Stoker AwardsWorld Fantasy Awards, and British Fantasy Society Awards. In 2003, the National Book Foundation awarded him the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.[6] He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his entire bibliography, such as the 2004 World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement and the 2007 Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America.[7] In 2015, he was awarded with a National Medal of Arts from the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts for his contributions to literature.[8] He has been described as the “King of Horror”, a play on his surname and a reference to his high standing in pop culture.[9]

(Source: Stephen King – Wikipedia)

Writers And Painters Are Not That Different


When I read this quote, I felt a little sting inside of me. So far, writing, to me, was something I love doing, but still, it is hard work. Therefore, I considered myself a ‘hard worker’, with some natural creativity, and, hopefully, some God-given talent.

I did not, whatsoever, combine my writing and the world ‘artist’ in the same sentence. And to me, a painter is clearly defined as an artist.

The moment I read that, I tried to find out who said it, and when I read ‘Voltaire’, I was surprised, and a tiny bit proud, too.

Voltaire is considered one of the best writers ever, busy as a bee, and in many ways controversial for the past times. His entire thinking was far ahead of his time. The fact that it was Voltaire, telling me that what I do is ‘painting’, just with words, instead of brushes, made me, for the first time, feel like being an artist.

Yes, I write, yes, I paint, I just paint with words… I paint wonderful pictures for the ones who take the time to stand still and ‘look’ at these pictures; take them in, enjoy them… read them, and imagine them… take my tools and use them to show your own picture in your head, in your dreams, in your imagination.

At this moment I consider this a wonderful Christmas present.

Thank you, Voltaire.


Voltaire Biography

Historian (1694–1778)
Author of the satirical novella ‘Candide,’ Voltaire is widely considered one of France’s greatest Enlightenment writers.
Who Was Voltaire?

Voltaire established himself as one of the leading writers of the Enlightenment. His famed works include the tragic play Zaïre, the historical study The Age of Louis XIV, and the satirical novella Candide. Often at odds with French authorities over his politically and religiously charged works, he was twice imprisoned and spent many years in exile. He died shortly after returning to Paris in 1778.

Early Life

Voltaire was born François-Marie Arouet to a prosperous family on November 21, 1694, in Paris, France. He was the youngest of five children born to François Arouet and Marie Marguerite d’Aumart. When Voltaire was just seven years old, his mother passed away. Following her death, he grew closer to his free-thinking godfather.

In 1704, Voltaire was enrolled at the Collége Louis-le-Grand, a Jesuit secondary school in Paris, where he received a classical education and began showing promise as a writer.

Beliefs and Philosophy

Embracing Enlightenment philosophers such as Isaac NewtonJohn Locke and Francis Bacon, Voltaire found inspiration in their ideals of a free and liberal society, along with freedom of religion and free commerce.

As a vegetarian and an advocate of animal rights, however, Voltaire praised Hinduism, stating Hindus were “[a] peaceful and innocent people, equally incapable of hurting others or of defending themselves.”

Major Works

Voltaire wrote poetry and plays, as well as historical and philosophical works. His most well-known poetry includes The Henriade (1723) and The Maid of Orleans, which he started writing in 1730 but never fully completed.

Among the earliest of Voltaire’s best-known plays is his adaptation of Sophocles’ tragedy Oedipus, which was first performed in 1718. Voltaire followed with a string of dramatic tragedies, including Mariamne (1724). His Zaïre (1732), written in verse, was something of a departure from previous works: Until that point, Voltaire’s tragedies had centered on a fatal flaw in the protagonist’s character; however, the tragedy in Zaïre was the result of circumstance. Following Zaïre, Voltaire continued to write tragic plays, including Mahomet (1736) and Nanine (1749).

Do You Dream About Your Story?


When I saw this quote, I immediately felt affected. It was like Neil Gaiman ‘read my mind.’ There are times I have a hard time thinking about something else than my current story. I write in the morning, in the afternoon, and sometimes at night… means, shortly, before I go to sleep. In such a case, I may dream of my story…

Don’t expect too much of my dreams, please. I don’t remember I ever was ‘part’ of my story or found myself to be one of the protagonists. It was more like I watched a scene that I wrote before. I admit, the one or other time I had to correct some view after I woke up – but if I dream of my story (and that doesn’t happen every night), mostly, things might be a bit hazy.

My dreams are not generally the place where I get my ideas from. I think they’re more a reflection of my writing than anything else. But they also inspire me and softly ‘push’ me forward to go to my story and continue writing because that is, what I do, and that is what I want to do.

Of course, I know that Neil Gaiman did not talk about literal dreams… but the book that is in my head, is a story I’m responsible for, a story I can build, a book that can come true, that others can read; a book that may bring joy and smiles to people… and all this is in my hands. I am responsible for.

I love that thought, and that’s why I picked this quote. I think it is a unique, positive thought I would like to hold on and share with you, with readers, with other authors, with friends.

What are your thoughts about this quote? Please share them in the comments.


 

Neil Richard MacKinnon Gaiman, (born Neil Richard Gaiman 10 November 1960) is an English author of short fiction, novels, comic books, graphic novels, audio theatre, and films.

His notable works include the comic book series The Sandman and novels Stardust, American Gods, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. He has won numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards, as well as the Newbery and Carnegie medals.

He is the first author to win both the Newbery and the Carnegie medals for the same work, The Graveyard Book (2008). In 2013, The Ocean at the End of the Lane was voted Book of the Year in the British National Book Awards. (Source: Wikipedia)


 

When Someone Has Already Written Your Book

Evie Gaughan writes about story ideas and that they might already have been written. Thank you for your very interesting and informative post, Evie!

Evie Gaughan

book_of_rose_flower_pink_soft_nature_hd-wallpaper-1562660‘There is no such thing as a new idea’, Mark Twain once wrote. Which is bad news for anyone trying to be original! But as he goes on to say, we can create new and endless numbers of new combinations. Still, what if you find that you keep coming up with ideas that have already been done? I’m reading a charming little book at the moment, ‘How To Fall In Love With A Man Who Lives In A Bush’, (quite easily, it seems, apparently Austrian men aren’t up to much) where the protagonist dreams of becoming an author. The only problem is that every story she comes up with has already been written …. by Charlotte Bronte or Stephen King!

It’s something of an occupational hazard for storytellers – even when it comes to choosing a title for your book. A quick search on Google will reveal that your…

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Ain’t That The Truth?

 

Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com


When I read this quote, I thought back to my life and was surprised I found nearly everything I thought “happened to me” that was painful, devastating, hard to take or heartbreaking (at least when it came to relationships) I had to go through all this to walk on a different path.
Most situations I was in, which I thought made me happy, were only a short illusion and neither one of them was good.

Now, each one of us, I think, has a different way to think “who” did change my/his/her situation. Some might think, it was ‘Karma,’ some may think it was, what it was, some may think, our life follows a certain path, and some others, including me, might think, God decided to show me a better direction.

One of my best friends once told me several times already: “God might have other plans with you.” And I think she’s right. However, it seems He’s quite busy keeping me on the path He has designed for me. My sense of orientation must be extremely lousy when He had to lead me back to the road ever so often.

I’m curious when I need to be saved the next time. But how do I know I’m going in the wrong direction, or I’m walking off the path that was created for me? Is this the ‘sense of life’ everybody speaks about? To know when to walk in the right direction, the one that takes you where you need to go? The one path that takes you directly to the Stairway to Heaven?

I sometimes wonder, what the future holds for me. But then: If we knew it ahead: Wouldn’t life be boring?


Picture courtesy of: https://www.insightforliving.ca/about/chuck-swindoll

Charles Rozell “Chuck” Swindoll (born October 18, 1934) is an evangelical Christian pastor, author, educator, and radio preacher. He founded Insight for Living, headquartered in Frisco, Texas, which airs a radio program of the same name on more than 2,000 stations around the world in 15 languages. He is currently senior pastor at Stonebriar Community Church, in Frisco, Texas.  (source: Wikipedia.com)

Discipline & Accomplishment

Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com


Reading the above quote, I was immediately thinking about how disciplined I am; and how disciplined I would like to be.

Me working in a full-time job, of course, I would love to have more time to write. Not that I never take time to. It often seems to me that I barely do anything else in my time outside the office, except working on one of my books. Either I write, or I type one of my drafts into the computer, or I edit, or I work on a copyright, a cover, or anything else that has to do with either writing or blogging.

There were so many days (and nights) I found myself in front of my computer at 2 am and realizing that I should have gone to bed three hours ago considering I have to get up and go to work sometime between 7 and 8 am.

Of course, when I get home, I have to provide myself and the cats with dinner, play with them, maybe have to clean at home, do laundry or get something else done that needs to be done in my daily life.

Occasionally there is just simply no time to do any writing or blogging. On a day like this, I find myself in bed, feeling guilty about neglecting my writing, pushing my passion and obsession to the very end of my ‘to-do’-list.

These are the days I feel I’m not disciplined enough to follow up and do whatever I can to reach my goal.

To this day I have no idea what more I can do to be more disciplined. A plan? A different ‘to-do’-list? I’ve tried it all. In the end, I just had to see: my priorities are set right. But once in a while, daily life needs more attention than expected. And no matter how much I love being a writer. I still need to have a home, pay my bills and get food on the table.

Sometimes I’m asking myself, what more can I do? And I wish I’d be wiser…


When I lately read this quote, I expected this quote to root in the wisdom of a successful and experienced man. And I was right. That’s why I tried to find out more about this man’s life.

Picture courtesy of Wikipedia.com

Emanuel James “Jim” Rohn (September 17, 1930 – December 5, 2009) was an American entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker.

Emanuel James “Jim” Rohn was born in Yakima, Washington, to Emanuel and Clara Rohn. The Rohns owned and worked a farm in Caldwell, Idaho, where Jim grew up as an only child.

Rohn left college after just one year and started his professional life by working as a human resource manager for department store Sears. From there he worked through different industries until the early 1960s when Rohn was invited to speak at a meeting of his Rotary Club. He accepted and, soon, others began asking him to speak at various luncheons and other events. In 1963 at the Beverly Hills Hotel, he gave his first public seminar. He then began presenting seminars all over the country, telling his story and teaching his personal development philosophy.

He presented seminars worldwide for more than 40 years. Rohn also coauthored the novel Twelve Pillars with Chris Widener.

Rohn was the recipient of the 1985 National Speakers Association CPAE Award for excellence in speaking. He is also the author of 17 different written, audio, and video media.

Jim Rohn died of pulmonary fibrosis on December 5, 2009. He is buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California. (Source: Wikipedia.com)

Characters and what or who inspires them – by Aurora Jean Alexander…

Today, our furry friend, The Story Reading Ape, published one of my gest posts. I’m very honored and flattered. Thank you so much for publishing it on your blog, Chris! ❤

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

When I start developing a character sometimes, I construct the person in my head; then I start writing down how she/he is going to be. First the ‘shell,’ then the inside. I very rarely ‘use’ someone I already know… someone I have met or is familiar to me.

It’s more that sometimes I recognize later, after the first draft, when I’m typing the book into the computer, that I find similarities with people I know.

This one time it’s a bit different.

A couple of months back I met a new co-worker of mine. She’s simply beautiful with her shiny black hair, blue ocean deep eyes, and her open, symmetrical heart-shaped face.

We talked about her descants and found out; she’s Irish. After talking to her and listening to her wonderful Irish accent, I decided I would love to use her as one of my main characters in one of…

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