How to Write a Novel Synopsis – Written By Jane Friedman

Jane Friedman provides us with information on how to write a novel synopsis. Thank you for this very educational post, Jane!


It’s probably the single most despised document you might be asked to prepare: the synopsis.

The synopsis is sometimes necessary because an agent or publisher wants to see, from beginning to end, what happens in your story. Thus, the synopsis must convey a book’s entire narrative arc. It shows what happens and who changes, and it has to reveal the ending. Synopses may be required when you first query your work, or you may be asked for it later.

Don’t confuse the synopsis with sales copy, or the kind of marketing description that might appear on your back cover or in an Amazon description. You’re not writing a punchy piece for readers that builds excitement. It’s not an editorial about your book. Instead, it’s an industry document that helps an agent or editor quickly assess your story’s appeal and if it’s worth them reading the entire manuscript.

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5 Mistakes When Writing Flashbacks in Memoir (and Fiction) – Written By Sarah Chauncey

This is an interesting and well-written post on Jane Friedman’s blog. Sarah Chauncey wrote about flashbacks in books and how many of us make mistakes when writing them in our story. Thank you very much for your information, Sarah.


Flashbacks are scenes that take place prior to the narrative arc of a story. They can illuminate any number of story elements, from revealing the origins of an unusual habit to new information about a relationship. Flashbacks can give the reader a depth of context not available in the primary narrative.

Alternately, flashbacks can help the reader understand your reaction to an event in the primary timeline. For example, maybe you had a fight with your spouse, and the exchange reminded you of how you used to cower in your closet when your parents fought. While you can tell with that line, showing via a flashback can be more engaging for the reader.

However, flashbacks can be tricky to write. Written unskillfully, flashbacks can leave a reader disoriented and disengaged.

What follows are the five mistakes I see most often in memoir manuscripts, though these principles are also relevant to fiction. If you’re writing fiction, just substitute “your main character” for “you.”

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Public Libraries: How Authors Can Increase Both Discoverability and Earnings – Written By Jane Friedman

Jane Friedman provides us with an excellent informative article about public libraries. Thank you so much, Jane.


When you see headlines discussing the staying power of print and the decline of ebooks, it’s important to remember those headlines are describing only sales of traditionally published books. Such headlines aren’t factoring in other market trends, such as digital subscription services, self-publishing, and—perhaps the most overlooked sector—library lending.

In 2017, OverDrive (the largest digital content catalog supplying libraries and schools) recorded 225 million ebook and audiobook checkouts around the world. To put that in context, consider that—during the same year—US traditional publishers reported 162 million ebooks sold.

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Trying to Make Your Story “Unique”? Beware of These Common Pitfalls – Written By Justin Attas

On the ‘Jane Friedman’ blog, Justin Attas wrote a guest post about three common pitfalls and how to avoid them. I find this an energetic, educational and interesting blog post which I thought I needed to share.


Today’s guest post is by novelist Justin Attas (@justinattas).


Writers always seek to produce a unique story, hoping readers will choose their book from the increasing pool of what’s available. But this can lead to creating a character or story that is “different” sheerly for the sake of, well, being different.

I’ve found three dangerous pitfalls for writers struggling to stand out:

  • “Strong” female characters
  • enemies-to-lovers storylines
  • Leading characters who are damaging, not damaged

Luckily for anyone struggling with one of these tempting story blackholes, there are ways out of all three.

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Changes to Amazon Advertising: What Authors Need to Know – by Dave Chesson

Dave Chesson informs us on ‘Jane Friedman’ what we authors need to know about the changes to Amazon Advertising. Thank you Dave!


Amazon is always looking for better ways to crank out a higher profit margin.

While some of their updates have been much to the chagrin of authors, recent changes to their book advertising system should help authors make better decisions about their ads and target their markets more precisely.

But it’s not all good. I’m leery of some aspects I think might be problematic.

To read the entire blog post, click here:

https://www.janefriedman.com/amazon-ads-changing/

How to Grow an Email Newsletter Starting from Zero – Written By Christina McDonald

On the Jane Friedman blog I found a great article on how to grow an email newsletter starting from zero – written by Christina McDonald. Thank you very much for the detailed descriptions and great ideas, Christina!


An email list is your secret weapon for selling books—it is a direct connection to your reader. But when I got my first book deal, I had no audience, no author Facebook page, and no email list. I knew I needed to build awareness to give my book the best chance to succeed. Here is my step-by-step guide to how I built my email list to 6,000 subscribers in one year.

1. Draft a plan

The first thing I did when I got my book deal was sit down and come up with a plan to build an email list. Coming from a digital copywriting background, I knew that social media sites like Facebook and Twitter were good for brand building, but not for getting people to buy. Buying happens through an email list. I also knew I would need to provide people with a benefit to get them to sign up. Here’s what I decided to provide:

  • Quarterly newsletters
  • Interviews with authors
  • Free book giveaways

To read the entire blog post go to:

https://www.janefriedman.com/email-newsletter-growth/

 

10 Instagram Tips for Writers – Written by Annie Sullivan

 

The other day, a high school freshman walked up to my book signing. When I asked if she had a Facebook account, she said, “No, Instagram.”

I should’ve known. For a while now, I’ve heard that Instagram is the new social media place for writers, but it felt confirmed in that moment. Younger generations (and even some older ones!) flock to Instagram for its feed of beautiful pictures.

So how can writers use Instagram to their benefit? Here are some easy things to keep in mind to find and engage your target readership on Instagram.

Continue reading the entire article here:

https://www.janefriedman.com/10-instagram-tips-for-writers/