Self-Publishing and Formatting Quick Tips

Jo Robinson provides us with a fantastic article about self publishing and formatting. Thank you so much Jo. I’m more than convinced these are a gift to us Newbies. (Even though I personally think you might hear from me, once I’m there).

Lit World Interviews

One of the biggest challenges to Indies is getting a professionally published looking book when up against the costs of editing, proofreading, formatting and cover designs. If you can afford these services then foregoing them is not a good idea, but when you really can’t afford them they can mean the death of some really great literature. There are a couple of things that can help though.

Editing or Proofreading Swopsies

Rather than simply asking for Beta readers, offer to swop proofreading services. Writers have a different kind of eyeball when reading. I’ve just finished a Joanna Trollope book, professionally published by one of the big houses, professionally edited and put together, but so far I’ve found a couple of typos and instances of poorly strung together sentences. As far as the cover design is concerned, if it wasn’t for the fact that I was specifically looking for and wanting…

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Give Your eBook as Much Love as Your Paperback

Jo Robinson from “Lit World Interviews” wrote an excellent article about e-book formatting on Createspace. Thank you so much Jo!

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Lit World Interviews

WHEN formatting your paperback manuscript for CreateSpace you can get away with a fair amount of fancy formatting. Fancy fonts, dropcaps, inserted widgets, bullets, tables, and all sorts of other things can be used. Pretty much if it’s locked into your PDF it will appear in your book. If you can’t lock it into your PDF then it won’t appear in your paperback. A Kindle eBook on the other hand should be rather thought of as an HTML page – just like a web page. The same way that when you set up a post on your WordPress blog various HTML codes are used for different things, when your eBook gets translated into HTML for publishing it will take anything that would normally be written as code and try to use that, often with disastrous results – rather than the gorgeous bullet list or laboriously tabbed lists that took you…

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Should You Buy Your Own ISBN Numbers?

Jo Robinson of Lit World Interview published an interesting, informative and very useful post about ISBN numbers. Thank you for your great guidance, Jo!

Books

Lit World Interviews

Your book’s ISBN (International Standard Book Number) is the 10 or 13 digit number assigned to every published book, and identifies things like edition, publisher and physical properties. Each particular edition of any published book has to have its own unique number, so you can’t use the same number if you choose to republish an already published book. The new book must have its own new number. I have seen writers on various forums claim that they’ve used the same ISBN number for both their paperback and their eBook versions, but if they did indeed get away with that they shouldn’t have. A quick squiz at Bowker’s rules (internationally applicable) will show quite clearly that a separate ISBN number is required for each format as well. eBook, audiobook, paperback and hardback. Getting even more picky, you could have MOBI and ePub versions published on different platforms. You could end up…

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How to Add a Bullet List to Your Kindle Book

Jo Robinson of Lit World Interviews provides us kindly with a very helpful article about how to add a bullet list to the kindle book. Thank you Jo!

 

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Lit World Interviews

Here’s a short tip for you Indie writers this week. With a couple of non-fiction books in the pipeline I spent some time a while ago researching how to put bulleted lists in a Kindle book, but came up with the take home that they are a no-no. I know that use of any type of Word auto formatting in an eBook can cause havoc in the end result. It is possible to create a really good looking bulleted list in my paint software and import it as an image without anyone being the wiser, but it is extra work that I’ve just now discovered doesn’t need to be done. The secret is to avoid the auto formatting.

You could have at a bit of HTML coding if you’re so inclined, as per the example below, but I really am not so inclined right now, so I kept looking. Some…

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Publisher Shopping

Angela Kays Books published an interesting, informative and wonderfully emotional article about her experience with deciding which way to go with her writing. Thank you so much for this blog post! I will get there too soon enough and I appreciate everything I can find.

Lit World Interviews

With my first manuscript finished, it’s time for me to start shopping around for ways to get my novel published. Originally, I wanted to go the way of an agent. I thought it’d bImage result for shoppinge so cool to actually have an agent to want to represent me. I still think so. However, I’ve slowly realized, even before published authors told me, that the publishing world changed drastically from ten, or even five, years ago.

The worse part of it all is that it always depend first on who you know, then it depends on whether you’ve published anything already. It’s a disheartening process. I’ve thought many times that I need to figure out a new direction for my life. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: the only problem with that is I’m 33 years old, and the only thing I feel I know to do is write…

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What do you like about Mysteries? – Reader Survey!

Ronovan Hester has published a new review. Please take a moment to share your opinion and make the review a success! Thank you!

 

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Lit World Interviews

Here we are on LitWorldInterviews with our first of many Genre oriented surveys. The success of our previous survey “Why do people stop reading a book?” and the response in the comments prompted a more detailed evaluation of the topic.

Please reblog and sharethis with as many people as you can so we have a lot of responses to make the data we share as accurate as can be expected. We need plenty of responses or there’s no reason to do the results.

This month’s survey is the genre of Mystery.

Thank you to the following 19 bloggers for making our previous survey such a success by reblogging the survey:

James Glenora

Aurora Jean Alexander

Juliette King

Stevie Turner

Linda G. Hill

Vanderso

Wendy Anne Darling

Adele Marie Park

Woebegone but Hopeful

Lori Carlson

Colleen Chesebro

E.S. Tyree

Ravenhawks’ Magazine

Sally G. Cronin

Gipsika

Tricia Drammeh

Susan Gutterman

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Pretty Paragraphs – Inserting Drop Caps

Jo Robinson of Lit World Interviews published a blog post about “Inserting Drop Caps” which I find worth re-blogging. It’s a great help for newbies like me; and maybe a few pro’s too. 🙂

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Lit World Interviews

The best place to look for information on how to publish your book for paper with CreateSpace is actually in your collection of traditionally published fiction and non-fiction. In their eBook, Building Your Book for Kindle, Amazon suggests both indenting the first sentence of paragraphs and also inserting empty space between paragraphs. A lot of Indies, myself included, made the mistake of using the same system for our paper books.

It’s not the end of the world, and doesn’t look terrible, but the way it’s usually done is either using indents with no spaces between paragraphs – apart from the first paragraphs of every chapter, which are not indented, or having the spaces between, but not indenting any of the paragraphs. Amazon recommend paragraph indents of 0.5” in Kindle books, and again, a lot of us carried that figure over when we formatted for our paper books. It also doesn’t…

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Survey Question-Why do you put that book down?

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Lit World Interviews has published a Survey to better writing and reading, to answer of course by as many people as possible. Please swing by and leave your reply!! This will help us all.

Lit World Interviews

Here is the first of our LWI Survey Questions. Never a list, just the one. Yes, I know there are two but the second is clarifying the first. The results will be shared, minus names provided.

Make sure to share this post around through social media and reblogging.

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A new #tool to promote (your posts, tweets, videos) Co-Promote

Olga Núñez Miret wrote a useful and interesting post about “CoPromote”, a new tool to spread words about our posts, tweets, videos, and so on.
I think this is excellent and I doubt I can resist too long to use it. 🙂 Thank you Olga.

Lit World Interviews

Thanks to Unspalsh for another great image Thanks to Unspalsh for another great image

Hi all:

A quick post just to make you aware of a new tool an author shared in one the Facebook groups I belong to.

It’s called CoPromote and you can find it here.

I haven’t been using it very long, so I’m learning as I go along, but I thought you might find it interesting. You can sign with Twitter, Facebook…. (the usual suspects). Once you’ve signed, the site gives  you the opportunity to promote (boost they call it) one of your Tweets, Tumblr posts or one of your videos in You Tube or Vine (or the four of them). You’ll have to connect your accounts in those platforms, if you have them, but then if you choose to boost a Tweet, for instance, the site brings up your Twitter feed and you can choose one of them…

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Is Kindle Unlimited Hurting New Indies?

I think this is an interesting and informative post, published by “Lit World Interviews”. I therefore decided to re-blog it.

Lit World Interviews

I was planning on posting the new TOC how to using Calibre this week, but I’m afraid that I haven’t been able to get to my computer to get the screenshots together this week – so next week it will be – promise. Getting back here today though, it seems that the whole writing world is up in arms about Amazon’s announcement that authors will earn by the page read, rather than by the percentage of a book read when a book is borrowed with Kindle Unlimited. Having vivid memories of starting out as a newbie to self-publishing of how easy it was to get totally confused and thrown off course by announcements from some established authors, I’m really glad that this didn’t happen back then.

It’s a fact that any Indie author out there right now with one, or maybe two books published, is not going to be laughing…

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