How Authors Can Grow a Large Audience and Connect With More Readers – Written By Jenn Hanson-DePaula

I read Jenn Hanson-DePaula’s recommendation on how authors can grow a large audience and found the advice quite helpful. I’m sure, I’m not the only one. Thank you, Jenn.


Have you ever looked at your social media outlets or your blog and realize that your friends and family are the only ones liking or commenting on your posts or reading your blog?

It’s a frustrating place to be – especially if you’re trying to grow your audience and reach more people.

I recently received an email from a woman named Lydia and she’s facing this exact situation. This is a question I’ve gotten before and I thought it would be helpful to everyone if I addressed it.

Continue Reading Here

One Thing Authors Can Do to Set Up a Successful Book Launch – Written By Jenn Hanson-DePaula

Jenn Hanson-DePaula published an excellent, very educational book launch blog post on Mixtus-Media. Thank you so much for your interesting article, Jenn. We appreciate your hard work.


I know the entire book marketing process can feel overwhelming and oftentimes confusing – especially when it comes to launching your book.
And with the avalanche of opinions coming your way, I know it can be hard to narrow things down as you try to focus on how to best set up your launch.

In my experience, there is one strategy that I encourage every author to use when getting ready to launch their book. That is creating a pre-order incentive, which is a limited time, exclusive gift that an author offers readers for pre-ordering their book ahead of its release.

Offering a compelling pre-order incentive can help you in several ways:

 

Continue Reading Here

5 Mistakes That Keep Readers From Following Authors on Social Media – Written By Jenn Hanson-DePaula

I found this excellent blog post on the Mixtus Media blog, written by Jenn Hanson-DePaula on why readers won’t follow us authors on social media. Thank you very much for this article, Jenn.


Social media is, hands down, one of the best ways to connect with new people all over the world. And yet, we still struggle with actually making those connections.

Why? Well, I tend to think that it’s because we have tried to make social media fit into marketing. That’s like trying to fit a square peg into a round hole. We use social media to broadcast our marketing message when we actually need to use it as it was designed to be used: as a way for actual human beings to interact with each other.

Social media can be incredibly powerful. I’ve seen and experienced its power first hand. It’s amazing to meet people all over the world and connect with them in a genuine and authentic way.

But if you’ve had a bad experience with social media, chances are there are just a few things that you need to adjust to get everything back on track.

I’ve broken down the top five mistakes that I’ve seen authors make on social media that keep readers from engaging with you.

Continue reading here

What to Share on Social Media Before Your Book Is Written – Written By Jenn Hanson-DePaula

Today I came across another great blog post, written by our wonderful Jenn Hanson-dePaula of Mixtus Media. She informs us about sharing on Social Media before our book is written. Thank you so much, Jenn.


When it comes to growing an audience on social media, every single author faces a time that I refer to as “The Gray Area.”

It’s that time between when you start writing a book and when it is released, and it’s often met with much trepidation from authors. The Gray Area is the time of needing to grow your audience but not knowing how to talk about your book early on in the process without giving too much away.

To see the results you’re looking for on social media, you have to be consistent. If you only post around the time your book comes out, you will probably be disappointed by the response.

If you think about social media as any relationship you have in life, this will make more sense. If you only talked to your friends when you needed something but ignored them the rest of the time, you won’t hear much from them.

Social media wasn’t created for marketing – it was created to build relationships.

And like any relationship, it takes time to establish trust. So as an author, it’s important to start that process as soon as possible. Even before your book is completed.

But how do you do that? How do you start that process before you’ve even started writing your book? Let’s jump in and find out!

Continue reading here

Newsletter – A Writer’s Stepchild – Information Written By Jenn Henson-DePaula

Many authors don’t know how important their newsletter is. I’m still working on that too. I think I made significant progress lately, but I’m still a beginner. On the Mixtus-Media blog I found two phenomenal posts, written by Jenn Henson-DePaula. She helps us with her experience and makes it easier for us to connect with our readers and subscribers. Thank you, Jenn!


How To Easily Create a Year’s Worth of Amazing Newsletter Content

Tell me if this sounds familiar:

I have a blog, so why do I need a newsletter?
No one reads newsletters! Why even bother?
I don’t want to bother people with a newsletter.
I don’t have time to write a newsletter!

I’ve heard it all. And I get it! When we first started Mixtus Media I put off starting a newsletter because I had those same thoughts running through my head.

But here’s the thing: a newsletter is one of the most important assets to incorporate into your book marketing plan.

Continue reading this post here

************************************************

25 Newsletter Incentive Ideas for Fiction Authors

When a reader signs up for your newsletter, they are moving from a mere spectator to a participant – someone who is one step closer to buying your book.
The key to growing a solid and thriving newsletter is to approach the process from the viewpoint of your readers. This will give you more clarity in what to provide for your readers and it will make your newsletter so much more effective.

When you focus on growing your newsletter list, one of the best ways is to provide a hook to make readers want to sign up by offering a free incentive. Offering a well-crafted incentive also ensures that you get the right people signed up for your newsletter – your ideal readers.
But for fiction writers, it can be difficult to think of creative or innovative incentives to drive interest.
The go-to incentive for most authors is the free chapter download. Now don’t get me wrong, this is a fine incentive, but nearly every author out there offers this.
To stand out and to offer great value to your growing audience, it helps to think outside of the box.

Continue reading the blog post here

How to Schedule a Week’s Worth of Social Media Posts in 30 Minutes – Written By Jenn Hanson-dePaula

On the “Mixtus Media” blog I found a great article, written by Jenn Hanson-dePaula. She provides us with advice about saving time working on our Social Media accounts. Thank you very much Jenn!


A big complaint that I hear from authors about social media is how much time it takes. They don’t want to waste what little time they do have on social media when they could be writing.

So imagine their surprise when I tell them that I spend no more than 30 minutes per week posting to social media. And about 5-10 minutes total each day responding to comments, liking posts and engaging with my audience.
Social media is very important to grow your audience, but it doesn’t need to take over your entire day.
I’d like to share my process so you can easily schedule your own social media posts ahead of time and be more productive.
So here’s what I do:

 

Step One: Outline My Buckets

Last week I shared my approach to creating content buckets to make creating content for social media so much easier. Our personal content buckets currently consist of our blog posts, an informational tip, and a quote from another author.
When I first started this process I would take a piece of paper and write out each day of the week and list which content bucket would go for each day. As you’re starting this process, that might be helpful for you to do as well.

To read the entire blog post go to:

https://www.mixtusmedia.com/blog/how-to-schedule-a-weeks-worth-of-social-media-posts-in-30-minutes?

 

20 Book Marketing Ideas That Take 10 Minutes Or Less – Written By Jenn Hanson-DePaula

Jenn Hanson-DePaula of Mixtus Media provides us with 20 book marketing ideas that don’t take too much time. I’m sure I’m not the only one grateful for this information. Thank you Jenn!


If there is one common thread that runs through every author it’s this: we don’t have enough time!

Sometimes when we see a huge task ahead of us, like book marketing, we tend to focus on it as a whole. And that can be overwhelming – which can make many of us put it off for another day, or just give up on it all together.

But when we break it down a bit, there is actually a lot we can get done in just a few minutes a day.

So I thought I would share some tasks that take 10 minutes or less that will vastly improve your book marketing.

These are tasks that can be done quickly during your lunch break, while you’re waiting in line to pick up your kids from school, or even during commercials breaks while watching your favorite show. It helps you get things done – and each task usually takes less time than you thought.

  1. Research hashtags. Think about keywords your ideal reader would use to find your book. For example, #ya, #mysterybooks or #novels. When you search that hashtag, more suggestions will be offered. Keep a running list of those hashtags and start using them in your posts or start liking and commenting on posts that use those hashtags as well. Your engagement and audience will grow! You can get your list started by downloading our free hashtag list.

Continue reading the entire blog post HERE

 

 

70 Conversation Starters for Social Media Engagement

Jenn Hanson-dePaula of Mixtus Media provides us with a great article on conversation started for social media. Thank you Jenn!


Have you ever posted something on social media and nothing happens? You might feel like it’s a waste of time because no one ever responds to what you post. Or maybe you feel like you’re just contributing to the noise online and everyone simply tunes you out.

Social media outlets have hundreds of millions of users worldwide, and each outlet wants their users to see posts that they will find interesting. So to make this possible, they use something called algorithms.

An algorithm is like a filter – it keeps the posts that people aren’t responding to out while letting the popular posts through.

So how do you actually get your posts seen and in your audience’s news feed? One effective and simple way to do that is by asking questions that require a quick and easy answer.

Most people are scrolling through their news feed very quickly. But if something catches their eye and doesn’t require a lot of time or thought, they will most likely respond.

The more likes, comments, shares, retweets, etc., your post gets, the algorithms will see that people are interested and will make your post more visible.

To continue reading this post go to:

70 Conversation Starters for Social Media Engagement

 

Just In Case You’re A Blogger Running Out Of Ideas

Jenn Hanson-dePaula presents us 100 new blogging ideas on ‘Mixtus Media’. Thank you Jenn! We really appreciate your efforts!


One of our most popular blog posts from the past few years was called 50 Blog Topics for Fiction Writers. I had a conversation with a fiction writer who said, “I write fiction – why would I need a blog? What on earth would I write about?”

That conversation inspired the blog post. And from the response that we got, it was a question that many fiction writers were asking as well.

For years I’ve heard from publishers, agents, and authors that they didn’t think blogs were necessary for fiction writers. I 100% disagree.

Blogs provide three important benefits for authors:

1) Value. A blog, podcast, video blog – whatever medium you want to use – is still the best way to show readers (and potential new readers) the author’s writing style, and it provides a long-form medium (relative to social media posts) to develop deeper interest and intrigue into their new book.

2) Traffic. A blog is the best way to drive traffic from social media back to the author’s website, which makes them, their book, and online presence more visible by helping with search engine rankings and social algorithms.

3) Connection. We don’t want readers to stay on social media – we want to drive them to the author’s website. A blog is the best way to deepen the connection between an author and their readers.

The purpose of a blog isn’t for a writer to talk about themselves. The purpose of a blog is to provide content that speaks to their ideal reader.

If you’re a fiction writer and you haven’t seen success with your blog, I would like to pose a question:

Are you using your blog as a means of promotion or to connect with your ideal readers?
If you want your blog, social media, book marketing, and so on to work, you have to come at it from the perspective of your ideal reader.

To read the 100 new topics for fiction writers to get you going, go to:

100 NEW Blog Topics for Fiction Writers

Should Authors #DeleteFacebook? – by Mixtus Media

I wanted to address a situation that might be concerning to you.
Facebook – yikes. There are a lot of questions rolling around.

Is my information safe? Is it going away? Should I delete my account? What the heck is going on?!?

Here’s the deal: there are still a lot of questions that need to be answered, and more information will be coming out over the next few weeks.

So what can you do until then?

If your ideal reader uses Facebook as their main social media outlet, there are ways that you can protect your information moving forward – which I’ll address in a minute.

But here are a few things I would encourage you to consider:

1. If you begin to see a dramatic decrease in engagement and growth of your Facebook Page, consider trying another social media outlet. I would encourage you to ask your audience what social media outlets they are on. Keep a clear line of communication flowing. If you see that they are moving to Instagram, Twitter, or Pinterest, strongly consider focusing more of your time and energy on one of those outlets.

To read the full blog post, go to:

https://www.mixtusmedia.com/blog/should-authors-delete-facebook