4th Halloween Poem Contest – Start!

Picture courtesy of: http://preventioncdnndg.org/

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It’s

October 10, 2018

1st Day of the 4th Halloween Poem Contest, here on ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest’.

It has started!

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Every author and poet are invited to participate and deliver a “Halloween-Poem” to my email address: aurorajean.alexander@aol.com, together with their picture and a link to their website and/or blog.

There are a few rules to follow:

  1. Your poem needs a Halloween theme.
  2. Your poem needs a minimum of 99 words.
  3. Your poem has to be delivered to my email address between October 10 and Halloween, October 31, 2018, 9 pm Central Standard Time.
  4. Your poem has to be delivered together with your picture and a link to your blog/page.
  5. Please avoid violence, bad language, and sexual content within the poems. It would be disqualified.

Every poem that meets the rules and is delivered within the deadline will be published here on “Writer’s Treasure Chest” together with the provided picture and link.

The contest starts October 10, 2018 06.00 am and ends October 31, 2018 09.00 pm Central Standard Time!!

Please, deliver your poem and your picture to my email address within this time frame, neither earlier, nor later. Poems arriving outside these 3 weeks will be disqualified.

aurorajean.alexander@aol.com

We’re looking forward to your poems! Write away, ladies and gentlemen, we are ready!

A. J. Alexander

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International Spine-chilling short story competition

Feel like writing a spine chilling short story? Author Bridget Whelan has provided us with a short story competition you could participate. Good Luck!

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

The Creative Competitor – an author service organisation – have been running writing competitions for over five years. This month they want something scary in 1000 words or less (and that includes the title).

1st Prize: £500
2nd Prize: £300
3rd Prize: £200
4th Prize: £100

Closing date: 31st October 2016
Entry fee: £3.50

spooky-pictureYou can use the above photo for inspiration but The Creative Competitior say they welcome imaginative interpretations of the theme. 

So here is another picture to chill your imagination.

hand-and-skeleton

Rules:

You must be aged 18 or over
Open to writers worldwide

Maximum word count is 1000 including the title
Submissions must be original and previously unpublished
You may include reference to the above photo
You may enter multiple submissions providing the correct fees are paid
Submissions must be written in English

Submissions must be pasted into the body of the email (unless otherwise specified) and sent…

View original post 95 more words

BOAW – Blog Fest 2016: Beauty changes during the time


Waterolor beautiful girl. Vector illustration of woman beauty salon
Waterolor beautiful girl. Vector illustration of woman beauty salon

 

This year I signed up to participate in the “Beauty of a Woman Blog Fest”, organized by August McLaughlin. Please enjoy the entire Blog Fest by clicking the link.

It is with great pleasure I am able to present my blog participation with the following post:

 


 

Beauty changes during the time:

In the 50s and 60s, the ultimate beautiful woman had a so-called “hourglass” figure. A chest, a butt and a small waist. Let’s travel back in time: in all big “fashion houses” the dresses and clothes were presented to the potential customers. The presenters weren’t window dummies – but real life “Mannequins”. We would call them the predecessors of the Models and Top-Models.

 

They were women – chest, hips and a small waist were their trademark. Even the most beautiful actresses and female stars of this time were fuller-figured women with the same measurements. Female beauty ideal back then was curvy, beautiful, feminine, showing their amenities and being proud of them.

 

Sophia Loren (Picture courtesy of www.google.com)
Sophia Loren (Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)
Marilyn Monroe (Picture courtesy of www.google.com)
Marilyn Monroe (Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)
Ursula Andress (Picture courtesy of www.google.com)
Ursula Andress (Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 70s and 80s show women, who remarkably slimmed down, their curves are still there, but not as explicitly distinct anymore.

I don’t dare to talk too much about the hairstyle and makeup which in my opinion, used to make women of these times look a little bit like extra-terrestrial clowns… but in many ways, their styles showed how much they enjoyed being women.

 

Michelle Pfeiffer (Picture curtesy of www.google.com)
Michelle Pfeiffer (Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)
Kim Basinger (picture curtesy of www.google.com)
Kim Basinger (picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The late 80s and 90s brought us breathtaking women, even slimmer, their features often gentle, almost delicate, their curves about to disappear. 

 

Audrey and Judy Landers (Picture curtesy of www.google.com)
Audrey and Judy Landers (Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)
Heather Locklear (picture curtesy of www.google.com)
Heather Locklear (picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then, with the entrance into the new millennium the female beauty ideal quickly went into the “nothing”… just skin and bones, no hips, no breasts, nothing: walking skeletons on wobbly legs.

Is this really how we women should be, or how we want to be?

When I was talking about this to a group of people a few years ago, a wise man told me: “Don’t starve yourself to this kind of figure, girl. You are right, the way you are. Skeletons aren’t sexy.”

I still love him for this sentence.

 

skinny-modelss_2000s
(Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)

 

 

Or: we got this kind of new, plastic surgical ‘beauty’:

 

(Picture curtesy of www.google.com)
(Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)
(Picture curtesy of www.google.com)
(Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Do I have to say something about it? Really?

 

Maybe a few might be curious why I was going through all these changes and travelling back in time: What made me? – How do I look then? What is my figure like?

 

I’m not saying too much. Except:

 

hour-glass
(Picture courtesy of: http://cliparts.co/clipart/3550410)

 

 

I have always been a little on the “more”-side and the criticism I had to take for this from all sides have hurt me deeply. During the years, when I had found out that my figure was very fashionable and once a beauty ideal all women wanted to have, I found this fact amusing – but not more. How was this useful for me? I wanted to be fashionable now. With my figure, I was born about 30 years too late. 

 

Am I ever going to be most beautiful to someone who I’d like to welcome into my life? Someone who loves me, just the way I am? With my soft heart, all the love I have to give and my hips, breasts and hourglass figure? 

Now I’m curious… Have you ever had experience with criticism on your figure? Are you happy with yours? Let us hear your experience. 

Thanks for your visit.