2021 Realization

Picture courtesy of Google.com

When I read that quote, I felt like this was the life anchor that held me grounded. It seemed I did a lot of that during my life…

I’m not going into details right now, otherwise, you’re still going to read tomorrow. (And no, just in case you’re asking me that, I won’t write an autobiography). I think, after all, my life was only interesting to me.

I consider myself someone who’s still searching. Searching for somewhere to belong… a place… a heart… a spot… something. At times I walk down a path and then seem to realize I walked in the wrong direction. So, what am I doing? I’m trying to correct that.

I might not have always made the best decisions in my life. But I was never bored. I try to learn from walking in the wrong direction and do better next time. It might work someday, who knows?

Am I asking myself, if that new path I’m about to walk down will be the right one? Yes, of course, I am. On the other hand, as one of my close friends says: “Everything happens for a reason”. Maybe this time I will see what’s at the end of the path… and maybe this time I will find the happiness – and the heart I was looking for…


Picture Goodreads.com

Gregory David Roberts (born Gregory John Peter Smith; 21 June 1952) is an Australian author best known for his novel Shantaram. He is a former heroin addict and convicted bank robber who escaped from Pentridge Prison in 1980 and fled to India, where he lived for ten years.

Roberts reportedly became addicted to heroin after his marriage ended and he lost custody of his young daughter. To finance his drug habit, Roberts turned to crime, becoming known as the “Building Society Bandit” and the “Gentleman Bandit”, because he only robbed institutions with adequate insurance. He wore a three-piece suit, and he always said “please” and “thank you” to the people he robbed.

At the time, Roberts believed that his manner lessened the brutality of his acts but, later in his life, he admitted that people only gave him money because he had made them afraid. He escaped from Pentridge Prison in 1980.

In 1990, Roberts was captured in Frankfurt, trying to smuggle himself into the country. He was extradited to Australia and served a further six years in prison, two of which were spent in solitary confinement. According to Roberts, he escaped prison again during that time, but thought better of it and smuggled himself back into jail. His intention was to serve the rest of his sentence to give himself the chance to be reunited with his family. During his second stay in an Australian prison, he began writing Shantaram. The manuscript was destroyed twice by prison staff while Roberts was writing it.


On my own account:

Just in case you’re asking yourself: Do I think it’s wise, or even ‘cool’, to quote Gregory David Roberts? My answer is no. To be frank, I’m not the biggest fan of the man – but this particular statement is worth quoting.