My Favorite 10 Books Of All Times III

Picture courtesy of unsplash.com

Continued…

I once owned many, many books – shelves full of books. But lately, things have changed for me. I moved – and if I had taken everything with me, only my loads and loads of books would probably have filled an entire shipping container. I, therefore, decided on a handful of my favorites, and I donated the rest of them. (that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re lost, after all, I have most of them electronically on my e-reader).
But a few books had to travel with me – books that are antiques – books that would have been lost if I hadn’t taken them… favorite books – MY favorite books, to be precise. Let me tell you what books I’m talking about – and why…

Death on the Nile – Agatha Christie

Blurb

Beloved detective Hercule Poirot embarks on a journey to Egypt in one of Agatha Christies most famous mysteries, Death on the Nile. The tranquility of a cruise along the Nile was shattered by the discovery that Linnet Ridgeway had been shot through the head. She was young, stylish, and beautiful. A girl who had everything . . . until she lost her life. Hercule Poirot recalled an earlier outburst by a fellow passenger: I’d like to put my dear little pistol against her head and just press the trigger. Yet in this exotic setting, nothing is ever quite what it seems.

My opinion

I admit I cut a little bit away from the blurb because I thought it doesn’t belong into a book blurb, to mention that it will be turned in a movie, following the ‘Orient-Express’ movie that was so successful, ect. etc. etc. If I think about Hercule Poirot, there is only one actor I always see right in front of my eyes: The great Peter Ustinov! But that isn’t what I wanted to say. To me, Death On The Nile is a wonderful example of many surprising and amazing detective stories Agatha Christie wrote. And still, this single adventure is apart, unique and maybe to me, it’s the tropical places in the story, the obvious killer who isn’t the murderer and the possibilities because, theoretically everybody on the ship could have done it – and had a reason… I’m usually convinced Agatha Christie is such a beloved author that the entire world knows who the murderer actually is – but I’ll be nice and won’t tell it here – just in case…


The Name of the Rose – Umberto Eco

Blurb

The year is 1327. Benedictines in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate. When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns detective. His tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon—all sharpened to a glistening edge by wry humor and a ferocious curiosity. He collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey, where “the most interesting things happen at night.”

My opinion

I had difficulties to read the book, even though I heard so much about it and was fascinated by the place and time of the book. It took me about three or four times until I finally got into the story. But then, once really starting, I fell in love with the little vanities of William of Baskerville, and of course, the dark secrets, the political intrigues, and of course, the past of some of the monks. How did they get there? What made them their calling? And I realized, back then, it wasn’t a calling to become a monk and a priest… it often was the family’s decision – or just the necessity to have a roof over the head and something to eat. Also, some of them liked the respect they earned as a man of God. And still, these men were not free of sin – as can be read in that book. The darkness of and secrets in the monastery is intimidating and, at times, unsettling. The author uses clear words and doesn’t spare us with blood and murder. William of Baskerville seems a strong and calm pillar within the sinful world of these monks… and then came the inquisition… The name of the Rose is a phenomenal book written by a great author.


Cheaper By The Dozen And Bells On their Toes – Frank B. Gilbreth Jr. & Ernestine Gilbreth-Carey

Blurb

Cheaper by the Dozen: Made into two classic movies—one starring Clifton Webb and the other starring Steve Martin—and translated into more than fifty languages, Cheaper by the Dozen is an amusing, endearing, and unforgettable memoir of the Gilbreth clan as told by siblings Frank Jr. and Ernestine Gilbreth.

Mother and Dad are world-renowned efficiency experts, helping factories fine-tune their assembly lines for maximum output at minimum cost. At home, the Gilbreths themselves have cranked out twelve kids, and Dad is out to prove that efficiency principles can apply to family as well as the workplace—with riotous results.

“A touching family portrait that also happens to be very, very funny.” —Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post

Belles on Their Toes: With twelve kids, life at the Gilbreth house has always been a big project. But after their father passes away, there are more challenges than ever. As their resourceful mother works to keep the family business running, the kids tackle the adventures of raising themselves and running a household.

With the irrepressible blend of humor and good cheer characteristic of one of the most beloved families in America, the Gilbreths rise to every occasion and find a way to keep it all together. Belles on Their Toes was also made into a movie with Myrna Loy and Jeanne Crain reprising their roles.

“There is a sincere and heartwarming atmosphere in this second volume that makes it almost better reading, if possible, than the first.” —Library Journal

My opinion

I got this book as a birthday present when I was about twelve years old. I started reading – and was immediately hooked. The book made me laugh, cry, and feel! I was connected to that family, like probably thousands of readers before me. Ernestine Gilbreth Carey and Frank B. Gilbreth Jr. touched millions of hearts by telling their childhood stories touchingly and humorously.

Lilian Moller Gilbreth and Frank Gilbreth sr. Planned an extended family, right after they got married – six boys and six girls. After seventeen years, they finally reached their goal. The two family members describe their life within the family so entertaining and humorous, it’s fun to read the book. I keep reading it about once a year, and it never gets boring.

However, there are a few little things I had to query. I realized that Mary, the second child, after Anne, was only mentioned one single time and never again in the entire book. What happened to her? The first boy, Frank B. (one of the authors), was born as the fifth child, after Anne, Mary, Ernestine, and Martha, but we don’t read anything else about Mary after that information. I had to do intense research to find out more. (Jane Lancaster who wrote a biography about the career woman Lilian Moller-Gilbreth) According to Jane Lancaster, Mary died from diphtheria. I wondered why the authors of the family books never mentioned it. I can only guess that they didn’t want to add too much sadness to this very humorous and cheerful family story. Also, they concealed another fact: apparently, their mother conceived another child but lost it. It appears that the family could not, as described in the book, stay together after the passing of the father, Frank B. Gilbreth sr. According to Jane Lancaster, at least one of the children was sent to the grandparents to California to grow up.

Maybe I shouldn’t be so very fussy about these details… maybe including these facts, the book would not have become what it did. It is a bewitching classic book, full of life, emotions, and laughter, something everyone needs once in a while!

My Favorite 10 Books Of All Times II

Picture courtesy of unsplash.com

Continued…

I once owned many, many books – shelves full of books. But lately, things have changed for me. I moved – and if I had taken everything with me, only my loads and loads of books would probably have filled an entire shipping container. I, therefore, decided on a handful of my favorites and I donated the rest of them. (that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re lost, after all, I have most of them electronically on my e-reader).
But a few books had to travel with me – books that are antiques – books that would have been lost if I hadn’t taken them… favorite books – MY favorite books, to be precise. Let me tell you what books I’m talking about – and why…

Lord of The Rings – J. R. R. Tolkien

Blurb

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them

In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth, it remained lost to him. After many ages it fell by chance into the hands of the hobbit Bilbo Baggins.

From Sauron’s fastness in the Dark Tower of Mordor, his power spread far and wide. Sauron gathered all the Great Rings to him, but always he searched for the One Ring that would complete his dominion.

When Bilbo reached his eleventy-first birthday he disappeared, bequeathing to his young cousin Frodo the Ruling Ring and a perilous quest: to journey across Middle-earth, deep into the shadow of the Dark Lord, and destroy the Ring by casting it into the Cracks of Doom.

The Lord of the Rings tells of the great quest undertaken by Frodo and the Fellowship of the Ring: Gandalf the Wizard; the hobbits Merry, Pippin, and Sam; Gimli the Dwarf; Legolas the Elf; Boromir of Gondor; and a tall, mysterious stranger called Strider.

This new edition includes the fiftieth-anniversary fully corrected text setting and, for the first time, an extensive new index.

J.R.R. Tolkien (1892-1973), beloved throughout the world as the creator of The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion, was a professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford, a fellow of Pembroke College, and a fellow of Merton College until his retirement in 1959. His chief interest was the linguistic aspects of the early English written tradition, but while he studied classic works of the past, he was creating a set of his own.

My opinion

Like everybody else who adores the J. R. R. Tolkien books, I’m a big fan of this huge fantasy epos. I read the three old books, The Fellowship Of The Ring, The Two Towers and The Return Of The King and loved them. This book includes all three of them. I had never thought these books could be made into a film – and Peter Jackson surprised me to no end. I love the films too.

I admit, I love the Lord Of The Rings more than the Hobbit-books – but that’s only me. I heard other Tolkien-fans loving all of them or preferring the Hobbit books… However, we do have an excellent author with a never-again reached fantasy book series, unique worldwide. No wonder these books belong to my personal favorites of all time.


Phantom – Susan Kay

Blurb

Phantom of the Opera fans no longer need to ponder what was in Erik’s past, as Kay has created one for him in this deeply moving, poignant story. . . This sad, but beautiful, novel will be especially popular with [those] who have enjoyed the current musical . . . ” – School Library Journal “A MUST READ! Haunting and riveting.”– Rave Reviews “Do we really need another spin-off of Gaston Leroux’s horror tale, The Phantom of the Opera? IF IT’S AS GOOD AS SUSAN KAY’S PHANTOM, YOU BET WE DO! – The Times Picayune “A VICTORY! STAYS WITH YOU AFTER THE LAST PAGE IS TURNED . . .” – Palm Beach Post Phantom From birth, Erik is disfigured, at once blessed and cursed. Inborn genius lifts him to the heights of the mind, but a horrible deformity denies him both his mother’s love and any chance at recognition. He escapes imprisonment to live a life on the run; he kills to be free. Finally, at the Paris Opera House, he encounters beautiful, talented Christine and defies the world and himself in a desperate attempt to love and be loved.

My opinion

I’m very tempted to admit what I had thought when I got this book as a present once. I looked at it and thought: ‘Oh Shit – not fanfiction again’… I know now that I thought the worst thing possible – and I was wrong. I had read Gaston Leroux’ Phantom of the Opera and I had seen the musical. I loved them dearly. Did I spend more than a fleeting thought on Erik’s past? Yes, I did. I wondered why he was hiding and what had happened to him that he apparently was as hurt, distrustful and dangerous as he was… But then I forgot to think about him. Until I got Susan Kay’s book. I thought I’d do my friend a favor. After all, she knows I’m an avid reader and I expected her to ask if I read her book. I would have been ashamed to say no. I read the first five pages – and was caught in a story that was more adventurous, unique – and unexpected than I thought it possible. Susan Kay starts with Erik’s birth and childhood. The reader grows up with him, is constantly at Erik’s side and starts to understand his development, his character and his mannerisms… We become the guardians of Erik’s secrets and their fiercest defendants. We know him, we know why he is the way he is – and we still love him… And that is why this is one of my favorite books.


Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen

Blurb

Pride and Prejudice is a novel of manners by Jane Austen, first published in 1813. The story follows the main character, Elizabeth Bennet, as she deals with issues of manners, upbringing, morality, education, and marriage in the society of the landed gentry of the British Regency. Elizabeth is the second of five daughters of a country gentleman living near the fictional town of Meryton in Hertfordshire, near London.Page 2 of a letter from Jane Austen to her sister Cassandra (11 June 1799) in which she first mentions Pride and Prejudice, using its working title First Impressions. Set in England in the early 19th century, Pride and Prejudice tells the story of Mr. and Mrs. Bennet’s five unmarried daughters after the rich and eligible Mr. Bingley and his status-conscious friend, Mr. Darcy, have moved into their neighborhood. While Bingley takes an immediate liking to the eldest Bennet daughter, Jane, Darcy has difficulty adapting to local society and repeatedly clashes with the second-eldest Bennet daughter, Elizabeth. Though Austen set the story at the turn of the 19th century, it retains a fascination for modern readers, continuing near the top of lists of “most loved books.” It has become one of the most popular novels in English literature, selling over 20 million copies, and receives considerable attention from literary scholars. Modern interest in the book has resulted in a number of dramatic adaptations and an abundance of novels and stories imitating Austen’s memorable characters or themes.

My opinion

Of course, like so many others, I love Pride and Prejudice, written by Jane Austen, who does, indeed, have experience in the mannerism of the times she writes about. Also, she paints with words, sceneries of cheerful liveliness impress her readers and I’m not surprised to hear, I wasn’t the only female reader falling in love with Mr. Bingley – at least a little bit, until finding out what a fine specimen Mr. Darcy actually is – and that he’s far not as arrogant and contempt as Elizabeth thinks… We know Bingley is wonderful – and badly influenced and we know he’ll be fine with Jane. She is a well mannered educated and smart lady, after all – but Mr. Darcy… “sigh”

 

My Favorite 10 Books Of All Times I

Picture courtesy of unsplash.com

I once owned many, many books – shelves full of books. But lately, things have changed for me. I moved – and if I had taken everything with me, only my loads and loads of books would probably have filled an entire shipping container. I, therefore, decided on a handful of my favorites and I donated the rest of them. (that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re lost, after all, I have most of them electronically on my e-reader).

But a few books had to travel with me – books that are antiques – books that would have been lost if I hadn’t taken them… favorite books – MY favorite books, to be precise. Let me tell you what books I’m talking about – and why…


Shogun – James Clavell

Blurb

After Englishman John Blackthorne is lost at sea, he awakens in a place few Europeans know of and even fewer have seen–Nippon. Thrust into the closed society that is seventeenth-century Japan, a land where the line between life and death is razor-thin, Blackthorne must negotiate not only a foreign people, with unknown customs and language, but also his own definitions of morality, truth, and freedom. As internal political strife and a clash of cultures lead to seemingly inevitable conflict, Blackthorne’s loyalty and strength of character are tested by both passion and loss, and he is torn between two worlds that will each be forever changed.

My opinion

Shogun is considered one of the best books ever written and I agree. John Blackthorne is a strong and still sensitive character, adjustable and interesting, fascinating and still steady… each of the characters within this book are thrilling… they all have a dangerous and deadly side – no matter how fragile they seem to be. The book descriptions are detailed, the character development is impressive and the adventures, ‘The Anjin-san’ has to go through are changing him and the ones who meet him. Life and death, joy and sadness, plans, counter-plans, and the deepest secrets are that close together, they are tangled in a web of silk and makeup… It’s easy to read why I love that book so much, isn’t it?


Winnetou – Karl May

Blurb

Complete Winnetou Trilogy – 3-volume edition. The adventures of Old Shatterhand, the young German adventurer, and Winnetou, the young Apache chief. During his first journey into the Wild West, a young greenhorn—Karl May, the adventurer—meets a young Apache, called Winnetou, while performing his job as a railroad surveyor in the Wild West. The first encounter is not at all amicable and during a violent Indian attack, the young German is near-fatally wounded. He is taken to the Apache pueblo to be nursed back to health, destined to die by torture at the stake…

My opinion

I particularly picked the entire Winnetou Trilogy, which means Winnetou I, II and III. I grew up with these books. (Actually, I grew up with the movies, but I’ll get to them later).  The Winnetou adventures were written by German author Karl May. I loved the Winnetou and Old Shatterhand adventures when I was a kid. They were very fantastic and still, these two heroes, weren’t they just made to dream? They probably were. Winnetou, a young Apache chief meets his German friend in the first book. Not that they were friends from the beginning, they fought, before their friendship. Once they are ‘brothers’ they have to go through many adventures.

I only found out many years later that the movies I grew up with, were ‘loosely’ based on the Karl-May-books. I, very carefully, say loosely, because looking back, the books are quite good, even though they are not ‘only’ fiction – they are simply fantasy… the movies are simply craptastic!

I read the books and loved it – later on, I did some research about Karl May’s life and learned that my ‘far-traveled’ author-hero had never seen the United States when he started writing the Winnetou-books. This trilogy, by the way, doesn’t hold the only Winnetou-adventures. He wrote 18 Winnetou and Old Shatterhand adventures. Now: not only did Karl May never see the Wild West but he also had the outrageous impudence to write the books in the first person – as the ‘German Adventurer’ and makes himself ‘Sharlih’ – Winnetous brother and hero of the books. This, and parts of his inglorious life turned my high opinion about this author into a slight contempt… but I admit, my reluctance towards the author did not make me love the book characters less.


The Long Masquerade – Madeleine Brent

Blurb

It is 1897, and a small ship sails the Caribbean, trading between the islands. This is the only home of a man and a girl who are runaways bearing false names, living constantly in fear of arrest for murder.
It was in a very different life that the girl, Casey, formerly known as Emma Delaney, married Oliver Foy and so became mistress of Diabolo Hall, one of the great houses of Jamaica. She found it a house well named, for indeed a devil dwelt there, a devil who meant to break her to his will.
Her beloved servant and retainer, Daniel Choong, put an end to that sinister marriage on the night of a great storm, and throughout the long sea-gypsy wanderings that followed, Casey has learnt the skills on which survival depends.
But this life is also to end in disaster, and Casey is brought penniless to England, there to meet again the man who is her friend’s enemy, the man who gambles, the man who possesses what voodoo believers fear as the ‘evil eye’. How love comes to Casey, and with it new danger and agonising decisions, is told in this latest Madeleine Brent story of mystery, romance and high adventure.

My opinion

I picked this one book of the existing Madeleine Brent books for no particular reason. I love them all. Madeleine Brent, which was long one of the best-guarded secrets in the literary world, is the pseudonym of British author Peter O’Donnell.

His Madeleine Brent books were ‘Historical’ English Romance books, the heroines are young English ladies in unusual life situations who have to go through all kinds of adventures – until at the end a huge surprise turns everything into a Happy End. Oh – and there is quite a nice romance involved as well. The perfect cute books to read… unfortunately they don’t exist as e-books but only as mass paperbacks, paperbacks and hardcovers. But I love them because they’re entertaining, smart, tangled and romantic and cute to read. When I read about the author’s secret I could hardly believe the books were really written by a man.

Madeleine Brent books:

The Capricorn Stone

Tregaron’s Daughter

The Long Masquerade

A Heritage Of Shadows

Kirkby’s Changeling  (Stranger at Wildings)

Stormswift

Moonraker’s Bride

Golden Urchin

Moonraker’s Bride


Deceptions – Judith Michael

Book Blurb

In a glittering world of lazy luxury, Sabrina reigns supreme. Invited to the most elegant parties, pursued by the most desirable men, she yearned for something more. . . . Her twin, Stephanie, is safely married with two adorable children and has everything in life that Sabrina lacks. But Stephanie longs to live like her rich and carefree sister. Changing places was to be their little secret. The game was never meant to get out of control. Neither of them dreamed how easy it would be to get lost in a maze of deceptions. . . .

My opinion

Deceptions is an excellently written book about twin sisters switching their lives for a ‘fleeting moment’ and then get caught in their own game. When I read the book I was very surprised how detailed not only the fun part of the adventure was described, but also the guilt, the inner conflicts and the motivations within the twin sisters. Of course, they didn’t want to hurt anyone. But this is a secret; a secret only the sisters know about… it is a given that others get hurt in the process… The story is perfect the way it is and I love it. By the way: There’s also a movie about this story – with Stephanie Powers as Stephanie and Sabrina. Let me say it this way: Read the book and save yourself the time and nerves it needs to watch that movie. Stephanie Powers is wonderful! – But the rest of the movie is a waste of time.

Even Jane Austen Suffered From Self-Doubt

Picture courtesy of quotefancy.com

Like many other writers, occasionally I suffer from self-doubt. I tried to think positive thoughts, tried to find encouragement, and did some research on the subject. And then I came across a quote about self-doubt:

“I think I may boast myself to be, with all possible vanity, the most unlearned and uninformed female who ever dared to be an authoress.”

I was surprised that this was said by Jane Austen, one of the most famous and most wonderful writers in English history – even globally.

I learned a lot from that quote: not only suffered Jane Austen from self-doubt – female authors are called ‘authoresses.’ *chuckle* I might be a little old-fashioned, but I somehow like it. Maybe I’m some relic from the 19th century.

But humor aside, like many other artists, I’m occasionally tortured by self-doubt. Am I good enough as a writer? Are my stories readable, are my characters likable? Am. I. Good. Enough.?

Of course, I would like to be a good author. I would love to have readers who fall in love with my characters and love my stories. But will that ever happen? I know, my book was read, I got reviews, and I know they liked ‘Soul Taker.’ But, what does ‘everybody’ else say?

Am I desperate to become famous? To be honest: no. I’d rather have my books and characters to be liked. I’d love people to say that ‘The Council Of Twelve’ series is a wonderful read.

I’m a person who, unfortunately, suffers too often from depression. I keep trying to consciously be aware of these weak times and pull myself out of them, as my Dad taught me, all these years ago. Self-doubt isn’t helpful in my case, but I refuse to drown in melancholy.

To read that even a fantastic writer like Jane Austen suffered from self-doubt in a way makes me feel sad for her, but it’s also a relief to find out I’m not the only one.

Do you suffer from self-doubts at times? If yes, how do you cope with them? Can you teach me a tip or trick to find my way out of them?


Picture courtesy of: http://www.biography.com

Jane Austen
(1775–1817)

Jane Austen was a Georgian era author, best known for her social commentary in novels including ‘Sense and Sensibility,’ ‘Pride and Prejudice,’ and ‘Emma.’

Who Was Jane Austen?
Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, England. While not widely known in her own time, Austen’s comic novels of love among the landed gentry gained popularity after 1869, and her reputation skyrocketed in the 20th century. Her novels, including Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility, are considered literary classics, bridging the gap between romance and realism.

Early Life
The seventh child and second daughter of Cassandra and George Austen, Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, England. Jane’s parents were well-respected community members. Her father served as the Oxford-educated rector for a nearby Anglican parish. The family was close and the children grew up in an environment that stressed learning and creative thinking. When Jane was young, she and her siblings were encouraged to read from their father’s extensive library. The children also authored and put on plays and charades.
Over the span of her life, Jane would become especially close to her father and older sister, Cassandra. Indeed, she and Cassandra would one day collaborate on a published work.

In order to acquire a more formal education, Jane and Cassandra were sent to boarding schools during Jane’s pre-adolescence. During this time, Jane and her sister caught typhus, with Jane nearly succumbing to the illness. After a short period of formal education cut short by financial constraints, they returned home and lived with the family from that time forward.

Literary Works
Ever fascinated by the world of stories, Jane began to write in bound notebooks. In the 1790s, during her adolescence, she started to craft her own novels and wrote Love and Friendship [sic], a parody of romantic fiction organized as a series of love letters. Using that framework, she unveiled her wit and dislike of sensibility, or romantic hysteria, a distinct perspective that would eventually characterize much of her later writing. The next year she wrote The History of England…, a 34-page parody of historical writing that included illustrations drawn by Cassandra. These notebooks, encompassing the novels as well as short stories, poems and plays, are now referred to as Jane’s Juvenilia.

Jane spent much of her early adulthood helping run the family home, playing piano, attending church, and socializing with neighbors. Her nights and weekends often involved cotillions, and as a result, she became an accomplished dancer. On other evenings, she would choose a novel from the shelf and read it aloud to her family, occasionally one she had written herself. She continued to write, developing her style in more ambitious works such as Lady Susan, another epistolary story about a manipulative woman who uses her sexuality, intelligence and charm to have her way with others. Jane also started to write some of her future major works, the first called Elinor and Marianne, another story told as a series of letters, which would eventually be published as Sense and Sensibility. She began drafts of First Impressions, which would later be published as Pride and Prejudice, and Susan, later published as Northanger Abbey by Jane’s brother, Henry, following Jane’s death.

In 1801, Jane moved to Bath with her father, mother and Cassandra. Then, in 1805, her father died after a short illness. As a result, the family was thrust into financial straits; the three women moved from place to place, skipping between the homes of various family members to rented flats. It was not until 1809 that they were able to settle into a stable living situation at Jane’s brother Edward’s cottage in Chawton.

Now in her 30s, Jane started to anonymously publish her works. In the period spanning 1811-16, she pseudonymously published Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice (a work she referred to as her “darling child,” which also received critical acclaim), Mansfield Park and Emma.

Death and Legacy
In 1816, at the age of 41, Jane started to become ill with what some say might have been Addison’s disease. She made impressive efforts to continue working at a normal pace, editing older works as well as starting a new novel called The Brothers, which would be published after her death as Sanditon. Another novel, Persuasion, would also be published posthumously. At some point, Jane’s condition deteriorated to such a degree that she ceased writing. She died on July 18, 1817, in Winchester, Hampshire, England.

While Austen received some accolades for her works while still alive, with her first three novels garnering critical attention and increasing financial reward, it was not until after her death that her brother Henry revealed to the public that she was an author.

Today, Austen is considered one of the greatest writers in English history, both by academics and the general public. In 2002, as part of a BBC poll, the British public voted her No. 70 on a list of “100 Most Famous Britons of All Time.” Austen’s transformation from little-known to internationally renowned author began in the 1920s, when scholars began to recognize her works as masterpieces, thus increasing her general popularity.

(Source: https://www.biography.com/writer/jane-austen)

Book Quote Challenge – Day one

Many thanks to Patricia Ann Schaack Garcia for inviting me to participate in the Book Quote Challenge.

 

It is a great honor for me to follow in her foot steps. And that won’t be an easy task. But I’ll do my best.

 

I have to present three quotes per day by an author  of my choice for three consecutive days.  My quotes for today have been picked from Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”.

**

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”  

**

“Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.”  

**

“I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”  

**

I’m sure, I don’t need to explain why they impressed me so much or who said what… These quotes are legendary – and they’re kind of burned into my memory.

 

Thank you Jane Austen for this wonderful story!


Picture courtesy of: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/9821363/Pride-and-Prejudice-universally-acknowledged-guide-to-the-human-heart.html
Picture courtesy of: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/9821363/Pride-and-Prejudice-universally-acknowledged-guide-to-the-human-heart.html