A Famous Advice Not Only For Writing

Image courtesy of Google.com

When I read that quote, I smiled. Walt Disney was famous – for creating a few of the most famous characters worldwide: Micky Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Pluto, Donald Duck, Daisy, Scrooge McDuck, Huey, Dewey, and Louie, and so many more that we love today.

I’m absolutely convinced, that if Walt Disney hadn’t lived his own philosophy, we probably still would wait for the famous mice and ducks! In other words, if Walt Disney had continued talking about his idea and not taken action and turned them from an idea into true cartoons to be shown to people, we had no chance of loving them for all these decades. Cartoons don’t come alive just by thinking about them…

And here we go: Our stories are not going to turn into books just by thinking about our idea for a story. Of course, first, there is the idea! But from there it has to go somewhere! No story writes itself!

Take a pen and a piece of paper, start planning – or writing, whichever comes easier! Or do everything on the computer, laptop, tablet, or even phone – whatever works for you and makes you happy – but start working physically!

  • If Umberto Eco hadn’t started writing, his famous ‘The Name of The Rose’ would never have turned into a book.
  • If Tolkien had not been looking for some paper, we couldn’t be reading about the ‘Lord of The Rings’.
  • If J.K. Rowling had hesitated to pick up her pen, Harry Potter’s Hogwarts would still be in ‘the dark’.

There are so many more examples, but I think, you get my thought. – Stop ‘considering’ if the story is good enough, stop hesitating, start writing… word by word by word. It is your story! If it wants to be written, write it! Don’t talk to half the world about your idea… you know, it might be good – and someone else could pick it up and turn it into the book you never had the courage to write! Wouldn’t that be disappointing?

So, write! Stop talking – start doing!

**********************************************************************************************************************

Walt Disney (1946) ((Wikipedia))

Walt Disney was born on December 5, 1901. Disney became one of the best-known motion picture producers in the world. He is particularly noted for being a film producer and a popular showman, as well as an innovator in animation and theme park design.

Disney is famous for his contributions in the field of entertainment during the 20th century. His first success was through the series, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit which was created by the Disney studio for Charles Mintz of Universal Studios. When Disney asked for a larger budget for his popular Oswald series, Mintz refused and Disney had to quit. Later, Disney and his brother Roy O. Disney started from scratch and co-founded Walt Disney Productions, now known as The Walt Disney Company. Today, this company has annual revenues of approximately U.S. $35 billion. This success is largely due to a number of the world’s most famous fictional characters he and his staff created including Mickey Mouse, a character for which Disney himself was the original voice.

Disney won 26 Academy Awards out of 59 nominations, including a record four in one year, giving him more awards and nominations than any other individual. He is also the namesake for Disneyland and Walt Disney World Resort theme parks in the United States, as well as the international resorts in Japan, France, and China.

Disney died of lung cancer in Burbank, California, on December 15, 1966.

(Source: MyEnglishPage.com)

Life And Weather

Picture courtesy of Google.com

When I read that quote it didn’t go out of my head for quite some time. The quote made me realize that currently I am forced to dance in the rain. I could imagine to many people this quote means many things. To me, currently, it means to live one of my strengths: resilience. I have to adjust to the difficulties that life challenges us with at times.

What, if we were spoiled at all times, never challenged, nothing ever changes? Besides being bored, wouldn’t we forget how to be grateful for what we have; for the comfortability in our life? I think, sometimes we need a ‘rainy day’, or overcast, otherwise we couldn’t appreciate the sunshine anymore.

Going through rough times doesn’t mean ‘giving up’, or being forced to give up. It means, fighting for what we had, what we want, what we desire to have, or have back. Sure, I could have sat there and hoped the ‘storm would pass’. But I didn’t know what would be after the storm: would the sunshine be back? Or would there be a flood, and I’d be forced to swim, after having lost everything?

After everything that floated into my direction, I found it made more sense to learn how to dance in the rain. And that’s when I decided to read the ‘signs’ life showed me… the bad weather forecast, so to speak, and start swimming into a new direction… I am going to dance in the rain for a while, and then I will see, where the sunshine is going to lead me, and what miracles and wonders it will show me in the future.

I look forward to meeting you by the one or other puddle, or, maybe, somewhere soon, when I will see the sunbeams.


Picture courtesy of Google.com

Vivian Greene is a visionary, artist, author and entrepreneur who spreads her messages of greater love and awareness to everyone on the planet.

Her intrinsic values are recognized by business moguls who seek her advice and major corporations who are encouraged to balance the highest good with the bottom line.

Vivian also enables artists, authors, photographers, speakers and visionaries to serve others and prosper by turning their works into inspiring products. This is your chance to dance in the rain with her and see this world be the best it can be: http://www.viviangreene.com

The Occasional Bad Day – And Taking It With Humor


I knew today wouldn’t be my best day ever. I had to face a few quite hard facts. I was behind everything, but in particular, I was delayed on a few things I had to do – and should have done quite a while ago.

After waking up with a hammering headache, the prospect of getting something done that I had secretly postponed day-by-day-by-week wasn’t compelling. However, I knew it was time to get it done and over with. I was still within ‘the deadline’, but I was definitely on the ‘late’ side, which I don’t like. But so far, everything else has seemed to be more intriguing than sitting down and getting that stuff done.

But a deadline is a deadline is a deadline. And yes, Douglas Adams has something to say about deadlines:

“I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.” ~Douglas Adams

I knew I couldn’t wait until that deadline flew by and moved over to my office. On the way, I stumbled over Charlet, my black tabby cat, who decided to cross my path just as I surrounded the corner from the living room to the office.

Thank God I could catch myself and didn’t fall, but in my haste to see myself, I hit two fingers on my desk, and one of my fingernails folded over – backward. Now, if you have nails as hard as mine, that hurts! I howled like a hungry wolf on a full moon. But that was no reason to delay. However, it was a reason to go back to the kitchen, get me a glass of buttermilk and wait until the pain had lessened a bit. Unfortunately, from yesterday to today, the buttermilk in question has gone sour.

Well, I got myself apple juice and shuffled back to the office.

Then I sat down and worked intensely for five hours to get my task done. That worked fine… until I found out that this wasn’t the only task I had. I promised to record something and send it out – which I did too. Two jobs are done. And I had to write a blog post for tomorrow, which I am doing right now, three tasks done.

I had to go to the bathroom in between, which I didn’t bother to slip into my house shoes, and stepped with my bare feet into a cat hairball… what a mess!

When I returned, I found out I had not finished the September Newsletter yet, which means, instead of getting ready for bed, I’ll get ready to get that done as well.

After all, it wasn’t a perfect day for me today. When I surfed through some quotes for this post, I found that quote from English author Douglas Adams and laughed loudly.

I know precisely, my day could have been much worse! There are people with horrible problems! (Even though I do have a few things that cause me stress and anxiety…)  But this quote made me laugh, and only the laughter made me feel better!

And I remember that very often, laughter can help. Look for something to giggle, for something to laugh about, look for a movie, a quote, a memory, or a couple of kitties, that tickly your humor center – and you will survive!

And with that, I’ll let you read a few more giggles from Douglas Adams. Giggle – and feel good about it!


Douglas Noel Adams was born on the 11th of March 1952 in Cambridge. He was an English writer and dramatist. Adams went to Brentwood School in Essex from 1959 to 1970. Until then his interest lied more towards Science rather than Arts. It was not until the age of ten when after achieving a full score in an essay, his teacher Frank Halford, encouraged him to follow a career in writing. While Adams was studying in Cambridge he hitchhiked from Europe to Istanbul, working various jobs to generate funds for it. After he left school in 1970 to follow his career as a writer, Adams was certain that success was eminent. However, the truth was far from this. After being discovered by Graham Chapman and John Lloyd he also made brief experiences in the series ‘Monty Pythons Flying Circus’. But Adams writings were not aligned with the style of radio or television of that time which proved to be a great hindrance in his success.

To make a living Adams tried several jobs including hospital porter, barn builder, bodyguard and chicken shed cleaner. Nevertheless Adams continued his efforts, though few of his works were accepted. In 1976, however, his career escalated a little when he wrote and performed ‘Unpleasantness at Brodie’s Close’ in a festival. But by the end of the year, he was in strife again. This left Adams with great depression and low self esteem. Slowly he learned to cope with his situation and decided to keep working hard for success.

His early works include ‘The Burkiss Way’ (1977) and ‘The News Huddlines’. In the same year later he worked once again with Graham Chappal to write an episode of ‘Doctor on the Go’. Adams most notable work is ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ which reached immense heights of success with the book being the number one seller in UK. He also became the youngest author to have received the Golden Pen Award for his book. ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ moved on to become a television series, a record album, a computer game and also theatrical plays. In 1980 he wrote another successful book ‘The Restaurant at the End of the Universe’ followed by ‘The Universe and Everything’ in 1982 and ‘So Long and Thanks for All the Fish’ in 1984 and ‘Mostly Harmless’ in 2002. Douglas Adams sold more than fifteen million books in United Kingdom, The United States and Australia and was a best seller in many languages including German and Swedish.

His works received many awards some of which are the ‘Imperial Tobacco Award’ (1978), Sony Award (1979) and ‘Best Program for Young People’ Society of Authors/Pye Awards for Radio (1980). In 1982, three of Adams books made it to the New York Times bestseller list and the Publishers’ Weekly bestseller list making him the first British author to achieve this target after Ian Fleming. His phenomenal book ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy’ was at the 24th number in the Waterstone’s Books and Channel list of the 100 greatest books of the century.

Douglas Adams died in Santa Barbara, California in May 2001.


All pictures in this post are courtesy of Google.com

Unique Advice To Aspiring Writers

Picture courtesy of Goodreads.com

.

When I discovered this quote, I was laughing out loudly. Of course, the name ‘Dorothy Parker’ was anchored somewhere in the back of my head. I remember I got different information about her. Some say she’s been known more for her impertinence than her writing. Others admire her for her wit, guts, strength and personality, and sense of style, writing, and adventure. I belong to the second group.

As a quick side note, The Elements of Style is a book written by William Strunk jr. and E. B. White and is described as THE classic style manual. I read the book several times and still consult it occasionally. I love the tone it’s written in, and it has helped me many times. I’m convinced it had helped many other writers too.

(Can be ordered @Amazon)


There are many recommendations for new writers.

  • No matter how hard it will be, never give up
  • Start writing; a book doesn’t write itself.
  • If you don’t start, you won’t get it done
  • The writing itself is only a tiny part of what being a writer means

Of course, there are so many more examples, but those are the ones I heard most, with minor variations, of course.

Encouraging new writers is a good thing. Being honest about the writing is another one. Writing in Dorothy Parker’s time was quite different from now, with our possibility of self-publishing. One can say it’s far easier today to see your own story published. In many ways, that’s true. But also, the entire process of self-publishing is often very much underestimated!

  • Writing
  • Editing
  • Formatting
  • Copyright
  • Book Cover
  • Release
  • Trailer
  • Marketing

Every single step of the way is a process in itself. Self-publishing does not mean you can sit down, write whatever you feel like, set it online, and become famous and wealthy. Don’t forget. There are millions of writers with the same idea – and enormous talent!

Self-publishing means you will have to deliver a nothing-less-than-impeccable final product! And part of that ‘writing process’ is quite costly. A self-drawn cover and Momma’s retired English Teacher’s editing won’t be sufficient. Formatting, copyright, cover, editing, trailer, marketing, it all needs funds. Throwing your book out there and expecting the money flowing into the bank account by the thousands is a utopia.

Even nowadays, self-published authors are still the step-children of the craft. The traditionally published authors with the agents are the ‘real’ authors. An author needs a thick skin and guts to deliver name and work out there.

Self-doubt and thoughts of giving up are a daily strain. Depression is widespread among writers, and only other writers can often understand what we are going through. Networking and supporting each other are essential and cannot start early enough in the process.

We want to read our fellow author’s work. We want to give them the famous pat on the back and want to tell them: “Well done!” We want to help and encourage, and many of us are fellow writers and lifelong friends! But we also need to face reality. We need to believe in ourselves. But also need to accept if the one or other story doesn’t work, isn’t as intriguing as we thought, or could be better if we’d take advice and the one or other suggestion.

That means, of course, the four initial recommendations above are still very accurate! And I’m convinced many more writers than just little old me are going to hear those. But it also means, as sassy as Dorothy Parker’s statement is, the one or other experienced writer can very much relate.


Dorothy Parker (née Rothschild; August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American poet, writer, critic, and satirist based in New York; she was best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th-century urban foibles.

From a conflicted and unhappy childhood, Parker rose to acclaim, both for her literary works published in such magazines as The New Yorker and as a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. Following the breakup of the circle, Parker traveled to Hollywood to pursue screenwriting. Her successes there, including two Academy Award nominations, were curtailed when her involvement in left-wing politics resulted in her being placed on the Hollywood blacklist.

One of her most famous screens was the one for the 1937 film ‘A Star Is Born’, which she wrote in cooperation with director William A. Wellman, Robert Carson and Alan Campbell, her husband. As we all know, the film has been remade three times: in 1954 (directed by George Cukor and starring Judy Garland and James Mason), in 1976 (directed by Frank Pierson and starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson) and in 2018 (starring Bradley Cooper, who also directed, and Lady Gaga).

Dismissive of her own talents, she deplored her reputation as a “wisecracker.” Nevertheless, both her literary output and reputation for sharp wit have endured. Some of her works have been set to music; adaptations notably include the operatic song cycle Hate Songs by composer Marcus Paus.

Parker died on June 7, 1967, the age of 73 of a heart attack, presumably caused by the alcohol addiction she suffered from for over a decade.

(Source: Wikipedia)


However, I don’t want to end this blog post on such a ‘severe’ and almost ‘sad’ note. Leave here with a big smile on your face, please! Let Dorothy Parker make you laugh before you leave:


Martini Quotes. QuotesGram


Writing Is Magic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When I was looking for inspirational quotes for writers,  I did not start searching for ‘Stephen King’ quotes in the first place. Of course, he is an amazing writer. I love some of his books. Later on in my life, I quit reading horror books. I loved each book of him that I read. But I admit, looking for a calm, inspirational ‘soft’ quote, and finding one that is almost ‘romantic’ from Stephen King, made me realize I ‘horribly’ underestimated him, pun intended.

And here it was, ‘speaking’ to me! You can, You should, and if You’re brave enough to start, You will. Writing is Magic.

I know I’m a wimp, but these three words almost made me cry. Yes, writing is magic! Or at least it is for me! I’m not necessarily talking about the fact that I write fantasy. I’m talking about the process of writing. When I take my pen and set it on the paper to watch the words flowing out of it, watch the ink forming the words that become a story, then I feel like I’m in a magical land, where I can hide. And yes, there is a lot to hide from. The current times, the situation, certain problems… whatever is happening… when I write, it is forgotten, for a certain time. When I write, I drink the water of life, as King describes it… and I’m happy.

Writing is art, writing is creative, writing is a place I can go where the magic happens. And the result is characters, places, stories, and books. That’s the place I want to be.

Thank you, Stephen King, for this wonderful emotional inspiration!


 

I don’t think Stephen King needs much of an introduction on a writer’s blog. He is, who he is, an inspiration to many of us! I, therefore, just picked a short description of who he is. Please click the ‘source’ link below if you would like to read more about him.

Picture courtesy of Google.com

Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of horrorsupernatural fiction, suspense, crime, science-fiction, and fantasy novels. His books have sold more than 350 million copies,[2] and many have been adapted into films, television series, miniseries, and comic books. King has published 61 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman, and five non-fiction books.[3] He has also written approximately 200 short stories, most of which have been published in book collections.[4][5]

King has received Bram Stoker AwardsWorld Fantasy Awards, and British Fantasy Society Awards. In 2003, the National Book Foundation awarded him the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.[6] He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his entire bibliography, such as the 2004 World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement and the 2007 Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America.[7] In 2015, he was awarded with a National Medal of Arts from the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts for his contributions to literature.[8] He has been described as the “King of Horror”, a play on his surname and a reference to his high standing in pop culture.[9]

(Source: Stephen King – Wikipedia)

Memorial Day 2020

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words but to live by them.”

                                                                                           – John F. Kennedy –



50,000 names (George Jones)

There are teddy bears and high school rings
And old photographs that mamas bring
That daddies with their young boys, playing ball.
There’s combat boots that he used to wear,
When he was sent over there.
There’s 50, 000 names carved in the wall

There’s cigarettes, and theres cans of beer
And notes that say I miss you dear
And children who don’t say anything at all.
There’s purple hearts and packs of gum
Fatherless daughters and fatherless sons
And there’s 50, 000 names carved in the wall

They come from all across this land
In pickup trucks and mini vans
Searching for a boy from long ago
They scan the wall and find his name
The teardrops fall like pouring rain
And silently they leave a gift and go

There’s stars of David and rosary beads
And crucifixion figurines
And flowers of all colors large and small
There’s a Boy Scout badge and a merit pin
Little American flags waving in the wind
And there’s 50, 000 names carved in the wall.

 

Martin Luther King jr. Day 2019

 

Honoring an extraordinary man

Each year, the Nashville Symphony hosts a special concert in honor of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Known as ” Let Freedom Sing,” this annual concert is free to attend and features the Nashville Symphony accompanied by adult and youth choruses drawn from the local community.
During the concert, the orchestra will perform an arrangement of classic pieces while photographs of the triumphs of the civil rights movement, provided by the Nashville Public Library, are projected on a large screen above the stage.

The concert will start at 7 p.m. on Sunday, January 20, 2019, at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Although the event is free to attend, you will need to reserve your seats at the box office in advance; you can pick up your tickets starting at 4 p.m.

Martin Luther King jr. has left us many of his intelligent, spiritual, thoughtful and important quotes, worth memorizing. I picked the ones I thought are still valid now and fit into Martin Luther King’s time and again now.

I uploaded his famous ‘Dream Speech’ for you to read, if you find time. And see how many elements of that speech, held 1963, have still a huge meaning in 2019.

mlk-dream-speech