How much does it cost to self-publish? That depends – Written By Roz Morris

I’ve had an interesting question from Tom. A lot of authors that are self-published avoid the question of cost. How much does it cost you to self publish? I would think that a lot of writers that aren’t financially well off want to know this info.

What a good question. To answer, I’d like to reframe it.

A lot of the basic aspects of self-publishing are low cost, or even free. Publishing on Amazon, Smashwords and Kobo, three of the major platforms, is free. Making Word documents and PDFs is free. Formatting ebooks and print books can be free if you’re careful and meticulous, and there are low-cost options to make it easier. Covers can be made free – or for very little money – in applications like Canva and Bookbrush.

So why do authors pay a lot more for publishing services?

The answer is: they’re paying for a professional edge. In editing, book production, cover design, copywriting. Marketing knowhow. Advertising. Access to curated audiences.

And how much does that cost? It’s honestly a difficult question to answer.

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When A Self-Published Author Dies What Happens To Their Books? – Written By Derek Haines

on Just Publishing Advice:

It’s not a question you ask every day, but what happens when a self-published author dies?

For the family of an author, you may want to keep the books available for sale.

In some cases, it’s relatively easy if there is a publishing contract and the publisher is still in business.

But it is not so simple if the author was self-published.

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Is Self-Publishing Looked Down Upon? – Written By Keri-Rae Barnum

on New Shelves:

Self-publishing does sometimes get a poor name, but if you do it right, people can’t tell the difference between self and traditionally published books.

If you have a beautiful book that has been:

  • Professionally designed inside and out
  • Professionally edited and proofread
  • Appropriately set-up for online and wholesale distribution

Most people do not even think to question if your book was self-published and many bookstores do carry these books.

However, if you bring in a book with a cover that looks like your granddaughter’s artwork, with no clue of wholesale or trade terms it’s going to be highly unlikely that the bookstore owner will want to carry your book.

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Top 15 Free Self-Publishing Companies For New Authors – Written By Derek Haines

on Just Publishing Advice:

If you are a new author, you have plenty of choices of free self-publishing companies to publish your book.

It is very easy to publish an ebook today and make it available to the world.

You can also publish a paperback book using print-on-demand services.

There’s nothing to stop you from publishing your new book, and yes, you can do it for free.

In This Article15 Free self-publishing companies, you can choose
.

The best choices for ebooks

.1. Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP)

2. Apple Books

3. Barnes & Noble Press

4. Kobo Writing Life

5. StreetLib

6. Xinxii

7. PublishDrive.


Ebook aggregators.

8. Draft2Digital

9. Smashwords.


Free paperback self-publishing

10. Amazon KDP

11. Blurb

12. IngramSpark

13. BookBaby

14. Lulu

15. Barnes & Noble Press.

Conclusion

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“I wish I had known that before I self-published.” 25 authors share what they’ve learned – Written By Sandra Beckwith

Sandra Beckwith provides us with the wisdom of 25 authors who share what they learned about self-publishing. Thank you so much, Sandra.


on Build Book Buzz:

It’s a common author lament. Maybe you’ve said it, too.

Nearly everybody has a story about something they learned after they started the self-publishing process. For many, the discovery came too late to save them time, money, or trouble.

That doesn’t mean you have to make the same mistakes, though.

Lessons learned

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Making a clean break – Written By Jamie Fessenden

Dear Friends and Fellow Authors

I read this blog post by Jamie Fessenden today. To the ones who don’t know him: Jamie Fessenden is a very talented LGBTQ author whose books I love! I’m sure we all can support him when he re-starts as an Indie author. Please, hop over to his blog and let him know when you’re prepared to help.

Thank you!


I’m sad to report I’ve had to break away from Dreamspinner Press. The publisher has been having financial difficulties for a while, and over the past year, authors haven’t been receiving their royalties—at least, not consistently. I still hold out hope that they’ll get things in order and return to being the reliable press they’ve been for most of the decade I’ve worked with them, but the hit they’ve taken to their reputation means it’s in my best interest to step away. The last book I had released through them (Small Town Sonata) sold very badly. It could be the book, of course, but there are a lot of factors to consider. Many readers are boycotting DSP books and a lot of review sites won’t review them.

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Public Libraries: How Authors Can Increase Both Discoverability and Earnings – Written By Jane Friedman

Jane Friedman provides us with an excellent informative article about public libraries. Thank you so much, Jane.


When you see headlines discussing the staying power of print and the decline of ebooks, it’s important to remember those headlines are describing only sales of traditionally published books. Such headlines aren’t factoring in other market trends, such as digital subscription services, self-publishing, and—perhaps the most overlooked sector—library lending.

In 2017, OverDrive (the largest digital content catalog supplying libraries and schools) recorded 225 million ebook and audiobook checkouts around the world. To put that in context, consider that—during the same year—US traditional publishers reported 162 million ebooks sold.

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How to Market Your Self-Published Book to Independent Bookstores – Written By Penny Sansevieri

Thank you for this very informative blog post, Penny Sansevieri. You gave me excellent advice, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s grateful.


Not everyone may say it, but it’s in everybody’s dreams to see their published books on a shelf in an independent bookstore.

This desire is justified: obviously, every one of us wants to go down in history as a person who wrote a bestseller or even a masterpiece that future generations will gladly read.

This seems like a wonderful dream that just comes true when you finish writing your book. Yet, in reality, not everything is as easy as it may seem. It’s likely that a publishing house will refuse to work with you or the editor won’t like your book. Besides, the added expense of working with a publishing house can strip you of the money that you can put into really smart book promotion strategies.

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Self-Publishing and Entrepreneurship – Written By Jami Gold

Jamie Gold tells us about Self-Publishing and Entrepreneurship. What are we – authors or entrepreneur? Thank you for your post, Jamie.


In many ways, a writing career has a lot in common with being an entrepreneur.

Even if we’re with a traditional publisher, we still have to manage our own branding, contracts, and acceptance of risk in ways that corporate employees usually don’t.

In the realm of self-publishing, the comparison to entrepreneurship is spot on.

Our writing and publishing endeavors create our own little company.

We’re responsible for assembling our team of editors, cover artists, and everything else—and we won’t succeed if we drop the ball.

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9 Pieces of Bad Publishing Advice New Writers Should Ignore – Written By Anne R Allen

Anne R. Allen provides us with bad publishing advice new writers should ignore. Thanks so much for your advice, Anne. We appreciate it very much.


Social Media is both a boon and a curse to new writers. Online writing groups and forums are an excellent source of insider information on the publishing industry—stuff we once could only find at expensive classes and writers’ conferences.

But social media is also a major source of misinformation and dangerously bad advice.

I belong to a lot of Facebook writers’ groups where I see newbies ask questions that get a bunch of conflicting responses. Sometimes when I see misinformation, I jump in to correct it, but often I can tell that resistance is futile. There’s such a wealth of bad advice that I don’t know where to begin.

I know some people can only learn that fire is hot by getting burned. Nothing a more experienced person says will change their minds.

But if you don’t feel the need to jump in the fire, here’s some popular bad advice you can ignore.

Continue reading HERE