Making a clean break – Written By Jamie Fessenden

Dear Friends and Fellow Authors

I read this blog post by Jamie Fessenden today. To the ones who don’t know him: Jamie Fessenden is a very talented LGBTQ author whose books I love! I’m sure we all can support him when he re-starts as an Indie author. Please, hop over to his blog and let him know when you’re prepared to help.

Thank you!


I’m sad to report I’ve had to break away from Dreamspinner Press. The publisher has been having financial difficulties for a while, and over the past year, authors haven’t been receiving their royalties—at least, not consistently. I still hold out hope that they’ll get things in order and return to being the reliable press they’ve been for most of the decade I’ve worked with them, but the hit they’ve taken to their reputation means it’s in my best interest to step away. The last book I had released through them (Small Town Sonata) sold very badly. It could be the book, of course, but there are a lot of factors to consider. Many readers are boycotting DSP books and a lot of review sites won’t review them.

Continue Reading Here

Public Libraries: How Authors Can Increase Both Discoverability and Earnings – Written By Jane Friedman

Jane Friedman provides us with an excellent informative article about public libraries. Thank you so much, Jane.


When you see headlines discussing the staying power of print and the decline of ebooks, it’s important to remember those headlines are describing only sales of traditionally published books. Such headlines aren’t factoring in other market trends, such as digital subscription services, self-publishing, and—perhaps the most overlooked sector—library lending.

In 2017, OverDrive (the largest digital content catalog supplying libraries and schools) recorded 225 million ebook and audiobook checkouts around the world. To put that in context, consider that—during the same year—US traditional publishers reported 162 million ebooks sold.

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How to Market Your Self-Published Book to Independent Bookstores – Written By Penny Sansevieri

Thank you for this very informative blog post, Penny Sansevieri. You gave me excellent advice, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s grateful.


Not everyone may say it, but it’s in everybody’s dreams to see their published books on a shelf in an independent bookstore.

This desire is justified: obviously, every one of us wants to go down in history as a person who wrote a bestseller or even a masterpiece that future generations will gladly read.

This seems like a wonderful dream that just comes true when you finish writing your book. Yet, in reality, not everything is as easy as it may seem. It’s likely that a publishing house will refuse to work with you or the editor won’t like your book. Besides, the added expense of working with a publishing house can strip you of the money that you can put into really smart book promotion strategies.

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Self-Publishing and Entrepreneurship – Written By Jami Gold

Jamie Gold tells us about Self-Publishing and Entrepreneurship. What are we – authors or entrepreneur? Thank you for your post, Jamie.


In many ways, a writing career has a lot in common with being an entrepreneur.

Even if we’re with a traditional publisher, we still have to manage our own branding, contracts, and acceptance of risk in ways that corporate employees usually don’t.

In the realm of self-publishing, the comparison to entrepreneurship is spot on.

Our writing and publishing endeavors create our own little company.

We’re responsible for assembling our team of editors, cover artists, and everything else—and we won’t succeed if we drop the ball.

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9 Pieces of Bad Publishing Advice New Writers Should Ignore – Written By Anne R Allen

Anne R. Allen provides us with bad publishing advice new writers should ignore. Thanks so much for your advice, Anne. We appreciate it very much.


Social Media is both a boon and a curse to new writers. Online writing groups and forums are an excellent source of insider information on the publishing industry—stuff we once could only find at expensive classes and writers’ conferences.

But social media is also a major source of misinformation and dangerously bad advice.

I belong to a lot of Facebook writers’ groups where I see newbies ask questions that get a bunch of conflicting responses. Sometimes when I see misinformation, I jump in to correct it, but often I can tell that resistance is futile. There’s such a wealth of bad advice that I don’t know where to begin.

I know some people can only learn that fire is hot by getting burned. Nothing a more experienced person says will change their minds.

But if you don’t feel the need to jump in the fire, here’s some popular bad advice you can ignore.

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Writing advice, because that’s what we writers like to do – written by Jamie Fessenden

I found a great blog post, written by successful author Jamie Fessenden. (Around Christmas time last year I read his novel ‘Tomte’ and loved it.) Thank you very much for your writing advice, Jamie! I don’t doubt I’m the only one who appreciates your post.


So my latest novel, Small Town Sonata, was contracted for publication by Dreamspinner Press, and I’m very happy. Hopefully, it signals the revving up of my writing career again.

So, in the spirit of that, and because someone asked about it in a Facebook group, I’ve decided to offer some Writing Advice (capitalized, to show how pompous… I mean “important” it is). Seriously, this is just some stuff I learned over the years. Take it or leave it, as you like. It’s less about writing than about some practical concerns.

 

To read the entire post, go to:

Writing advice, because that’s what we writers like to do


P.S. To check out Jamie Fessenden’s ‘Tomte’ click HERE

Operation F.E.C.A.L: New Publishing & The High Cost of FREE – Written By Kristen Lamb

 

FREE! For the love of all that is chocolate, free us from FREE! *takes soothing breath* I’ve been blogging for over ten years, a witness to the terrifying and extraordinary changes in publishing.

Initially, I was NO fan of self-publishing because entropy is alive and well…even with books. I knew once we opened Pandora’s Publishing, there would be no turning back.

Sometimes I really hate being right.

Amazon (and others) weaponized on-line shopping and launched us into an age of FREE, EASY, CHEAP, ACCESSIBLE and LEGAL.

Or, as I like to call it—Operation F.E.C.A.L.

Amazon wanted to implode traditional publishing. Their goal was to dominate on-line retail and raze the big-box model in order to make room for new brick-and-mortar Amazon stores (smaller and smart-stocked using algorithms). What better way to obliterate publishing than by handing out author participation trophies?

Yet, there have been plenty of consequences. Namely, LOTS of F.E.C.A.L. material out there.

A lot. *swats flies away*

It began innocently enough…

To continue reading the entire article click here:

https://authorkristenlamb.com/2018/06/free-publishing-bad-books/

Want to Stand Apart from Countless Other Books? Write a Better Story – Written By Kristen Lamb

Read the advice Kristen Lamb has on writing a better story. Thank you very much for all your efforts, Kristen!


Last time, I brought up a subject I never believed would warrant discussing—cockygate. I wish this was the first time a writer did something epically misguided to gain advantage. Some drama to sell their ‘story.’ But, I’ve been around too long. Seen too much.

Yes, I was there for the BIG BANG (dot.com implosion). I also witnessed Web 2.0 shoot out of the dying Web 1.0’s ribcage then skitter up into the vents.

Where did it GO? What is it up to? What does it WANT?

Good Question

As early as 2004, I projected the digital tsunami that was going to obliterate the world as we knew it.

Why is ‘Age of Aquarius’ suddenly stuck in my head?

Anyway, it began with Napster and Tower Records, then Kodak, blah blah and starting in 2006 I began blogging and predicting the next industry to fall…and the next…and even how and roughly when it would happen. All along I insisted publishing and writers needed to be prepared because we were also in its path.

Over the course my first years as a ‘social media/branding expert’ (an occupation widely regarded as a made-up job like ‘unicorn groomer’) I noted a trend.

Pretty much every year, new and evolved ‘bright idea fairies’ (BIFs) hatched with frightening regularity. This trend continues because shortcuts are tempting. Um…cockygate.

Enough said.

To read the entire blog post, go to:

https://authorkristenlamb.com/2018/05/write-better-story/